GSW Martial Arts Academy      

Curriculum

*For Information on the use of the listed Curriculum please contact Mr. Shannon. Use of this Curriculum without prior written consent is prohibited.*

 

GSW MARTIAL ARTS ACADEMY
Tae Kwon Do
And More!

STUDENT HANDBOOK

 

What is Tae Kwon Do?

 

Tae Kwon Do is a form of unarmed combat, or martial art, which has been developed over the past 20 centuries in Korea. For a Tae Kwon Do practitioner, the entire body is a weapon, and one is easily able to counter-attack an aggressor with hands, fists, elbows, knees, or feet. Tae Kwon Do is a method of self-defense, and should never be used except to defend oneself or someone who is unable to defend themselves. Only after an opponent launches an attack does the practitioner defend with a counter-attack. This is why every Tae Kwon Do form begins with a block.

 

Translated from Korean, “Tae” means, literally, to jump, smash or kick with the foot. “Kwon” denotes a fist, chiefly meaning to punch or destroy with hand or fist. “Do” means an art, way, or method. Thus, Tae Kwon Do indicates the technique or unarmed combat for self-defense, or the “art of foot and hand”.

 

More generally, Tae Kwon Do is a philosophy or way of life, which compliments the physical grace and power of the fighting skills. This philosophy can best be described as seriously trying to observe the five tenets, in all areas of life and not just while inside the do-jang. GSW Martial Arts Academy has added 2 additional tenets to the original 5. All 7 consist of Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect.

 

Tae Kwon Do uses more leg techniques than hand techniques. There are three reasons for this. Leg techniques, (1) have more reach, (2) are more powerful, and (3) have the element of surprise.

 

Tremendous skill and control are required in Tae Kwon Do. While blocking, kicking and punching techniques all contribute to making Tae Kwon Do one of the most exciting and competitive sports; its challenge lies in the adept use of techniques without having any actual body contact. Complete control over punching and kicking movements is paramount in stopping just centimeters short of the opponent.

 

Through the coordination of control, balance, and technique in the performance of hyungs (patterns), Tae Kwon Do is regarded as a beautiful and highly skilled Martial Art. It is also one of the most all-around methods of physical fitness. It utilizes every single muscle of the body and is considered the ultimate in unarmed self-defense. In Korea, the Presidential Protective Forces are all trained in Tae Kwon Do and several other countries have adopted it into the training programs of their protective forces as well.

 

The style of Tae Kwon Do we study at GSW Martial Arts Academy is called Chang Hun. Chang Hun is the penname under which General Choi Hong Hi, the founder of modern – day Tae Kwon Do used to write his papers.

 

Tae Kwon Do is more than an art of action.

 

Tae Kwon Do is a physical expression of the human will for survival and an activity to fulfill the spiritual desires of man. Basically, all the actions in Tae Kwon Do are developed from the human instinct for self-defense reinforced with positive elements as needs arise, and ultimately reach the absolute state to overcome the ego and arrive at the moment of perfection, thus giving the sport a philosophical dimension.

 

Sports Value of Tae Kwon Do - The Ostensible Meaning – Tae Kwon Do is a Comprehensive Physical Sport.

 

Tae Kwon Do is an overall physical sport. In it, one has to move all the muscles and joints of the human body. People become devoted to sports from various necessities, to adapt to their environment and preservation of life, and because they revere life. The necessities include those for physical survival in the human habitat and also those to harmonize with the inner demands for preservation of balance. Tae Kwon Do is a sport that responds rationally to survival needs and also maintains an orderly system uniformly related to the inner or outer environments of the human being.

 

Tae Kwon Do is a complex series of movements comprised of highly related postures of systematic, scientific acts to move all parts of the body. Therefore, Tae Kwon Do has become an essential element to preserve and maintain the order of human functions.

 

“Karate” is a Japanese word that means “empty hands” and should not be mistaken for the art of Tae Kwon Do.

 

Origin and Formation of Tae Kwon Do

 

All animals, as well as human beings have strong instincts to protect themselves. For instance, when someone tries to harm another person, he dodges or crouches to protect the vital parts of the body instinctively. The basis of Tae Kwon Do is considered to have derived from variations of such passive postures for self-defense.

 

The origin of Tae Kwon Do goes back to the early days that the human race existed on earth. As a means of life, Tae Kwon Do had been streamlined and gradually formalized, then developed into a positive and perfect level due to the necessity for social life, as simple human life became complex and diversified.

 

Diversification of life reflects the degree of civilization, pre-conditioned by satisfaction of demand and needs. At first physical strength to survive in the difficulty of the environment was required. Preventive measures to protect oneself from outer assaults and expansion of living conditions became a necessity. The reason that Tae Kwon Do was transformed from a defense to an aggressive art derives from such social transitions.

 

Tae Kwon Do has matured into the present martial art through a process of developments based on experience, wisdom and imagination.

 

Training Hall (Do-Jang)

 

A Do-Jang is an area where young and old, men and women, regardless of race or creed, come to learn Tae Kwon Do for the promotion of their mental, moral, physical, and cultural education. It should be a place where a certain “esprit de corps” between members can be established with a common goal of promoting and cultivating a noble character. Certainly to fill the prerequisites necessary to attain these ideas, a well-trained black belt instructor is needed. This is a primary consideration. The hall itself must also have the facilities, equipment, and strict regulations to help discipline the student’s mind and body. The size of the do-jang and equipment to be used can be flexible according to the circumstances and individual choice. Again, the only thing that cannot be compromised is the quality of the instructor.

 

Practice Suit (Do-Bok)

 

The do-bok is considered a primary necessity in training for the following six reasons.

 

1. The wearing of the do-bok should instill pride in the wearer as a practitioner of Tae Kwon Do.

2. It identifies individual capacity and degree of Tae Kwon Do cultural education attained.

3. The style of the do-bok is symbolic of Tae Kwon Do heritage and tradition.

4. Grade and degree changes, which are noted with belt color, create incentive while at the same time preserving humility.

5. It is extremely practical and healthy.

6. It is a tool to be used. Listening to the material snap can help indicate proper use of power.

 

The do-bok consists of a shirt, pants, and belt. It is very important for the wearer to keep it clean at all times, wear it correctly, and treat it with the respect owned to its art.

 

Student Belt

The Students belt is to remain tied properly at all times. If the belt should come untied during class, the student is to bow and turn around and face away from the instructor and re-tie it properly. The Knott is to be tied properly and should ALWAYS face to the left. ‘Traditional Karate” ties the belt facing to the right to symbolize power. This can easily be misunderstood as aggression. The Knott being tied to the left symbolizes Defense. Since we study the art of self defense it would go against the nature of our art form for the belt to be tied facing to the right.

 

It is NOT acceptable to wash the belt. Tradition indicates that if you wash the belt, you wash away the experience earned while wearing the belt. The belt should not be permitted to drag the floor. The belt should be held and worn as a badge of honor for all of the achievements the student has earned. Each Color has its meaning. By disrespecting the belt, it is an indication that the student does not respect the meaning of the belt.

DISCIPLINARY ACTION WILL BE TAKEN FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE DO-JANG’S RULES AND REGULATIONS
.

 

PENALTIES WILL VARY AT THE DISCRETION OF THE INSTRUCTOR, SUCH AS: DEMOTION OF RANK, SUSPENSION, OR EVEN TERMINATION OF TRAINING.

Students Attitude

 

1. Student should never tire of learning. A good student can learn anywhere, anytime. This is the secret of knowledge.

2. A good student must be willing to sacrifice for his art and instructor. Many students feel that their training is a commodity bought with monthly dues and are unwilling to take part in demonstrations, teaching, and working around the do-jang. An instructor can afford to lose this type of student.

3. Always set a good example for lower ranking belt students. It is only natural they will attempt to emulate senior students.

4. Always be loyal and never criticize the instructor, Tae Kwon Do, or the teaching methods.

5. If an instructor teaches a technique, practice it and attempt to utilize it.

6. Remember that a student’s conduct outside the do-jang reflects on the art, the instructor, and our school..

7. If a student adopts a technique from another do-jang and instructor disapproves of it, the student must discard it immediately or train at the gym where the technique was learned.

8. Never be disrespectful to the instructor. Though a student is allowed to disagree with the instructor, the student must first follow the instruction and discuss the matter with the instructor at a later time. Disputes during class are a disruption and will not be tolerated.

9. Any complaints should be taken directly to the instructor, not into a side conversation with other students or during class time.

10. A student must always be eager to learn and ask questions. A student should never be afraid to ask questions. Questions are a wonderful tool for learning.


The Tenets of Tae Kwon Do

 

The tenets of Tae Kwon Do should serve as a guide for all serious students of the art. At GSW Martial Arts Academy, We use the original 5 tenants of Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, and Indomitable Spirit. We have also added Modesty, and Respect to further enhance our students. We believe that the use of all 7 tenets equal Humility and that Humility is required to be a proper Black Belt.

 

MODESTY - Tae Kwon-Do students are expected to be humble about their accomplishments. Those who flaunt their achievements may have physical power, but their achievements are hollow, for they lack the spirit of Tae Kwon-Do. The Yin cannot exist without the Yang, so Tae Kwon-Do cannot exist without the Spirit. This means being free of vanity and conceit. A student should not boast about merits or achievements.

COURTESY - It can be said that courtesy is an unwritten regulation prescribed by ancient teacher of philosophy as a means to enlighten human beings while maintaining a harmonious society. It can further be, as an ultimate criterion, required of a mortal.

 

Tae Kwon Do students should attempt to practice the following elements of courtesy to build up noble character and to conduct the training in an orderly manner, as well.

 

1. To promote the spirit of mutual concessions

2. To be ashamed of one’s vices, contempting those of other’s

3. To be polite to one another

4. To encourage the sense of justice and humanity

5. To distinguish the instructor from the student, senior from junior, and elder from younger

 

INTEGRITY - In Tae Kwon Do, the word integrity assumes a looser definition than the one usually presented in Webster’s dictionary.

 

One must be able to define right and wrong and have the conscience, if wrong, to feel guilt. Listed are some examples, where integrity is lacking:

 

1. The instructor who misrepresents himself and his art by presenting improper techniques to his students because lack of knowledge or apathy.

2. The student who misrepresents himself by “fixing” breaking materials before demonstrations.

3. The instructor who camouflages bad techniques with luxurious training halls and false flattery to his students.

4. The student who requests rank from an instructor, or attempts to purchase it.

5. The student who gains rank for ego purposes or the feeling of power.

6. The instructor that teaches and promotes his art for materialistic gains.

7. The student who feels ashamed to seek opinions from his juniors.

 

PERSEVERANCE - There is an old Oriental saying, “Patience leads to virtue or merit.” “One can make a peaceful home by being patient for 100 times.” Certainly, happiness and prosperity are most likely brought to the patient person. To achieve something, whether it is a higher degree or the perfection of a technique, one must set his goal, and then constantly persevere. Robert Bruce learned his lesson of perseverance from the persistent efforts of a lowly spider. It was this perseverance and tenacity that finally enabled him to free Scotland in the fourteenth century. One of the most important secrets in becoming a leader of Tae Kwon Do is to overcome every difficulty by perseverance.

 

Confucius said; “one who is impatient in trivial matters can seldom achieve success in matters of great importance.”

 

SELF - CONTROL - This tenet is extremely important inside and outside the do-jang, whether conducting oneself in free sparring or in one’s personal affairs. A loss of self-control in free sparring can prove disastrous to both student and/or an opponent. An inability to live and work within one’s capability or sphere is also a lack of self-control. According to Lao-Tzu “the term of stronger is the person who wins over oneself rather than someone else.”

 

INDOMITABLE SPIRIT - “Here lie 300, who did their duty,” a simple epitaph for one of the greatest acts of courage known to mankind. Although facing the superior forces of Xerxes, Leonidas and his 300 Spartans at Thermopylae showed the world the meaning of indomitable spirit. It is shown when a courageous person and his principles are pitted against overwhelming odds.

 

A serious student of Tae Kwon Do will at all times be modest and honest. If confronted with injustice, he will deal with the belligerent without any fear or hesitation at all, with indomitable spirit, regardless of whomsoever, and however, many the number, may be.

 

Confucius declared; “it is an act of cowardice to fail to speak out against injustice.” As history has proven, those who have pursued their dreams earnestly and strenuously with indomitable spirit have never failed to achieve their goals.

 

RESPECT - In the Do-Jang, we show respect to the black belts, instructors, parents, and guardians by answering, “Yes Sir”, or “Yes Ma’am”.    It is also proper to end all responses with “Sir” or “Ma’am”. We bow to our instructors before class and after class not for religious purposes but out of respect for their hard work and dedication to the art and the students. Respect is imbued throughout our Student Rules and Etiquette to help teach our students to honor their place of learning, build pride in their school and in their self. Respect is a key ingredient in their learning and we strive to make it a part of their personality inside the school and out.


The United States Flag

 

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

 

George Washington explained the American Flag thusly: The stars taken from heaven, the red from England and white stripes were added to indicate a separation from a Mother country. Stars have long been used to denote dominion and sovereignty and are ancient symbols of Egypt, India, and Persia.

 

The blue stands for vigilance, perseverance, and justice. The red is hardness and valor and the white means purity and innocence.

 

There are thirteen stripes, red and white, which stand for the original thirteen states that fought and won our freedom and gave birth to our nation. There are fifty white stars lying on a field of blue, each representing the states in our country today.

 

The South Korean Flag

 

The Korean flag symbolizes much of the thought, philosophy, and mysticism of the Orient. The symbol, and sometimes the flag itself, is called the “Tae Geug”.

 

Depicted on the flag is a circle, divided equally, and blocked in perfect valance. The upper section (red) represents the Yang, and the lower (blue) represents the Um, an ancient symbol of the Universe. The two opposites express the Dualism of the cosmos: fire and water, day and night, dark and light, construction and destruction, masculine and feminine, active and passive, heat and cold, plus and minus, and son on.

 

The central thought in Tae Geug indicates that while there is a constant movement within the sphere of infinity, there are also balance and harmony. As a simple example, kindness and cruelty may be taken into consideration, if parents are kind to a child, it is good, but they may spoil and weaken him, thus, leading him to become a vicious man and a source of disgrace to his ancestors.

 

Three bars at each corner also carry the ideas of opposition and balance. The three unbroken lines stand for heaven; the opposite three broken lines represent the earth. At the lower left hand of the flag are two lines with a broken line between. This symbolizes fire. The opposite is the symbol of water.

 

Student Pledge – Spoken at the beginning of class.

I will observe the tenets of Tae Kwon Do.

I will respect my instructor and all Student ranks.

I will never misuse Tae Kwon Do.

I will be a champion of freedom and justice.

I will help build a more peaceful world (and use the appropriate finish of “Sir” or “Ma’am”)!

 

Ending Creed

 

As a dedicated student of the Martial Arts, I will live my life by the principals of Black Belt: Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect.

 

Rank Testing

The following are proper procedures for testing day that the student will want to follow:

 

1. You should be on time for your testing. You should be here early so that you can warm up ahead of time.

2. Be accountable to the five tenets. They are the true basis for all rules. Students should memorize the tenets and be able to explain in their own words what each part of he tenets mean.

3. Promotions will be based on class attendance, testing performance, and general attitude in Tae Kwon Do. Physical ability is in second place to mental conditioning and attitude.

4. Know the Korean terminology.

5. Students must know the meanings of their forms and the number of movements as well as the meaning of the belt colors.

6. Registration and testing fees should be taken care of the week before testing.

7. No jewelry is to be worn.

8. Proper respect should be given to the higher belt ranks and Black Belt judges and should always be shown.

9. Remember you are being graded from the time you walk in the door until the time you leave. This includes proper warm up, attitude, and respect.

10. Attitude is important. Showing excitement and a good positive attitude will yield positive results.

11. Judges will offer any help or suggestions that they may. However, it the student’s performance and attitude that is being graded. Proper preparation is vital to a good testing!

12. Any and all Book Reports, Written Tests, or other assignments given by the instructor are to be turned in before the student will be allowed to test.

Meanings of Belt Colors -10 Belt system

Here at GSW Martial Arts Academy, we use a 10 belt color system to signify rank.

White-Innocence or no prior knowledge of Taekwon-Do

Yellow-Earth-from which a plant sprouts and takes root as the Taekwon-Do foundation is being laid.

Orange-Sun-as the seed needs the nurturing of the sun to grow, so does the skill that has sprouted.

Green-Growth-the plants growth as the Taekwon-Do skill begins to develop

Purple-Mountains-The path of the student becomes steep like a mountain path as the tree is in mid growth.

Blue-Heaven-signifies the heaven towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in Taekwon Do progresses.

Brown- Roots- The tree is firmly rooted in the earth just as the student now has deep roots in the skill of Tae Kwon Do.

Red- Danger- cautioning the student to exercise control, and warning the opponent to stay away.

Black- the Opposite of white, therefore, signifying the maturity and proficiency in Taekwon Do. Also indicates the wearer’s imperviousness to darkness and fear.

 

Type of belt Rank for 10 Belt System used at GSW Martial Arts Academy

 

Black belt -Deputy (or probationary) to Ninth Degree (Dan) –Opposite of White

Black Stripe (on the length of the red belt) 1st Gup a.k.a. Conditional Black Belt (conditions must be met to test for Black Belt)

Red Belt 2nd Gup- Danger

Brown Belt 3rd Gup- Roots

Blue belt 4th Gup–Sky/Heaven

Purple Belt 5th Gup-Mountains

Green belt 6th Gup-Growth

Orange Belt 7th Gup-Sun

Yellow belt 8th Gup-Earth

White belt 10th Gup-Innocence

 

Meanings of Traditional Belt Colors -6 Belt system (For reference only)

White – Signifies innocence, as that of a beginning student who has no previous knowledge of Tae Kwon Do.

Yellow – Signifies Earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as the Tae Kwon Do foundation is being laid.

Green – Signifies the plant’s growth, as the Tae Kwon Do skill begins to develop.

Blue - Signifies the heaven towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in Tae Kwon Do progresses.

Red - Signifies danger, cautioning the student to exercise control, and warning the opponent to stay away.

Black – Opposite of white, therefore, signifying the maturity and proficiency in Tae Kwon Do. Also indicates the wearer’s imperviousness to darkness and fear.

 

Type of belt Rank for 6 Belt System (For reference only)

 

Black belt -Deputy (or probationary) to Ninth Degree (Dan)

Black Stripe 1st Grade (Gup)

Red Belt 2nd Gup

Red Stripe 3rd Gup

Blue belt 4th Gup

Blue Stripe 5th Gup

Green belt 6th Gup

Green Stripe 7th Gup

Yellow belt 8th Gup

White belt 10th Gup

 

One Step Sparring (Recommended Self-Defense)

 

One step sparring is designed to help you coordinate your techniques into a block and counter attack pattern. This is actually a simulated fight, as are the forms, but in this case there are two persons involved, attacker and defender. Opponents begin by facing each other in the ready position. The attacker steps backward with the right foot into a fighting stance, and sharply says “kiah”! Upon signal (“kiah”!) from the defender, the attacker then steps forward, with the right foot, into a right front stance while punching with the right hand directed at the defender’s solar plexus. The defender then blocks and counter attacks the attacker’s punch with the correct technique. Both then return to ready positions and resume the pattern, this time changing roles of attacker and defender. No actual physical contact is necessary during the performance of one-step sparring except for the actual blocking of the attacker’s forward punch, and even here only light contact is necessary and that only to keep an over anxious defender from walking into the opponent’s fist! The purpose is to help you determine distance and accuracy. You should start by maintaining enough distance that you are certain not to strike your opponent, then gradually work closer as you become more accurate. Timing and speed, used with proper control, are the factors that will show the student’s ability’s as they progress.

 

Free Sparring

 

Once a student reaches the rank of yellow belt, they begin to learn how to free spar. Free sparring is a controlled exchange of technique between two students. It is less rigid than one step sparring in that the student himself decides what combination of techniques should be used. The emphasis of free sparring is control and distance. Students should exercise control as to the amount of contact made during sparring. Dependant on the rank of student, no contact, light controlled body contact (point-sparring rules with no head contact) and only under the instructor’s supervision will be the enforced rule. We at GSW Martial Arts Academy believe that safety comes first. You must wear complete sparring equipment before sparring. Headgear, mouth guard, rib protection (under 18 yrs old), hand gear, shin pads, and footgear comprise the complete set. Males will also wear groin protection. Any gear purchased outside the Do-jang must be inspected by an instructor to verify and approve of its effectiveness and use inside the Do-jang. It is recommended that all gear to be used be purchased through the School to ensure proper quality. Any gear not passing inspection will not be allowed to be used during classes and should remain at home.

 

Components of Power

Speed – Concentration – Equilibrium - Reaction of force –Breath control

 

Some Questions that may be asked during your test!

 

1. What does Tae Kwon Do mean? Foot – Hand – Way.

2. Who is the modern day founder of Tae Kwon Do? General Choi Hong Hi.

3. What year was Tae Kwon Do nationalized? 1952 by General Choi Hong Hi.

4. What type of Tae Kwon Do are you studying? Chang Hun.

5. Why was this style created? To unify all the kingdoms and Kwons of Korea.

6. What year was Tae Kwon Do officially recorded as the national martial art of Korea? 1955

7. How many hyungs are there in Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do and why? 24; representing 24 hours, one day, or all my life.

8. When executing a technique, should you relax or tense your muscles? The muscles should be relaxed.

9. What is a front stance? Feet spread shoulder width apart, two shoulder widths long, 50% weight is on both feet, front knee bent and toes forward, back knee straight. Shoulders and hips squared to front.

10. What is a back stance? Heels in line or slightly apart, 1 ½ shoulder widths or 2 ½ foot lengths apart, 60% weight on rear leg with knee bent, and toes pointed to side. Front knee bent slightly with toes pointed to front.

11. What is a horse riding (middle) stance? Feet two-shoulder widths apart and pointing forward, equal weight distribution, with both knees bent.

12. Why are the feet used more than the hands? Longer reach, stronger muscles, and element of surprise.

13. Why do we “Ki-ah”?  To startle the opponent, get our adrenaline flowing, empty air from our stomach.

14. Why should both ends of the belt hang evenly? To represent equal mental and physical ability, that your left and right sides have equal technique, and for neatness.

15. Should you ever wash your belt? Why or why not? No, you should never wash your belt, it contains all the sweat and dirt (knowledge) of your training, doing so would wash away your knowledge.

16. What are the 2 different ways for holding your foot when executing a round kick? Toes pulled back, using the ball of the foot (as in a front kick), or bent so as to use the instep (top of the foot).

17. When executing a sidekick, should your base leg be bent or straight? Straight.

18. When you are in a front stance executing a technique, do you push off your rear leg or pull with your front leg? You emphasize pulling with your front leg.

19. What do you like best in Tae Kwon Do?

20. What has Tae Kwon Do given you?

What IS a black belt?

 

There is, of course, the obvious answer. It’s black, about two inches wide, and in good or poor condition, depending on how long it’s been worn. In our School we affirm that being a black belt is in the course of serving others, being humble, and above all caring. Physical skill is only a small portion of being a Black Belt. The majority of being a Black Belt is having the correct mental attitude, which involves highly the things previously stated. It is NOT however about “kicking butt and taking names”.

 

There are, however, other topics NOT worth discussing. For example, who is better, a boxer or a karate fighter? You’ve probably heard that more than a few times.

 

Could Chuck Norris beat Bruce Lee?

 

What talents do black belts actually possess and what talents are fictional?

 

BLACK BELT SHOULD’S

 

* A black belt should possess undying courage.

* A black belt should have great strength, because he or she has learned a way to generate power. In fact, there should be more power now, than before training was started.

* A black belt should have kindness in his heart for the underdog, the elderly, the sick, and should be willing to use the art to defend these people without fear for oneself.

* A black belt should always be humble, because, through knowledge, he or she should realize how much there is to learn and how much they don’t know.

* A black belt should realize that there is always more to accomplish in this art.

* A black belt should know that he or she must earn respect from students and others in the martial arts community, that it can’t be demanded.

* A black belt should seek an overall perspective of the martial arts.

* A black belt should know that, except in extremely rare instances, the martial arts aren’t a platform for stardom. Rather, the art is a platform for character perfection.

 

BLACK BELT SHOULD NOT’S

 

* A black belt should not be the tough guy on the block who wants to show off.

* A black belt should not think he or she is invincible – no matter how good you are, there is someone better!

* A black belt should not believe he could beat anyone he wants, just because they’re trained to be a black belt.

* A black belt should not believe he would stay in shape for the rest of his life, without continually working at it.

* A black belt should not criticize other styles or other’s traditions. There is no one right way in the martial arts.

* A black belt should not be uncaring about others. He should not forget empathy, sensitivity and understanding.

* A black belt should not feel that others owe him something because he is a black belt.

 

Forms (Hyungs)

 

Forms are attacking and defensive movements which follow a predetermined sequence. Each Hyung is in actuality a simulated fight, designed to enable a person to “practice fight” multiple opponents without breaking the technique and balance necessary to deliver effective blows. Although all the forms are different, and increasingly more complicated as you advance in rank level, there are certain basic elements common to all:

 

1. Most forms should begin and end at exactly the same spot. This will indicate the performer’s accuracy.

2. Correct posture and timing must be maintained at all times.

3. Muscles of the body should be either tensed or relaxed at proper critical moments in the exercise.

4. The exercise should be performed in a rhythmic movement without stiffness.

5. Movement should be accelerated or decelerated according to instructions.

6. Each pattern should be perfected before moving to the next.

7. Students should know the purpose of each movement.

8. Students should perform each movement with realism.

9. Attack and defense techniques should mostly be equally distributed among right and left hands and feet.

 

The ancient law in the Orient was similar to the law of Hammurabi, “an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth”, and rigorously enforced even if death was caused accidentally. (It cannot be unsaid about the three books in The Bible where the laws of that day are stated. (Exodus 21:23, Leviticus 24:19, and Deuteronomy 19:21.) Living in this type of environment, and since the present system of free sparring had not yet been developed, it was impossible for a student of the martial arts to practice or test his individual skill of attack and defense against actual moving opponents.

 

Individual advancement was certainly hindered until an imaginative practitioner created the first forms.

 

Hyungs are various fundamental movements, most of which represent either attack or defense techniques, set to a fixed and logical sequence.

 

The student systematically deals with several imaginary opponents under various assumptions using every available attacking and blocking tool from different directions. Thus Hyung practice enables the student to go through many fundamental movements in series, to develop sparring techniques, improve flexibility of movements, master body shifting, build muscles and breath control, develop fluid and smooth motions, and gain rhythmical movements.

 

It also enables a student to acquire certain special techniques, which cannot be obtained from either fundamental exercises, or sparring. In short, a pattern can be compared with a unit tactic or a word, if fundamental movement is an individual soldier’s training or alphabet. Accordingly, in the pattern, the ledger of every movement is a series of sparring, power, feats, and holds a characteristic beauty.

 

Though sparring may merely indicate that an opponent is more or less advanced, forms are a more critical barometer in evaluating an individual’s technique.

 

Most martial arts styles use forms as their basic method of training. The types of form taught vary from style to style. Chinese forms, for example, emphasize circular movements. Korean and Japanese forms are more angular and linear in movement.

 

Forms are not exercises in the calisthenics sense. These forms may be more accurately described as choreographed movements. Depending upon the style of martial arts, the student may be required to learn from one to as many as 30 or more hyungs.

 

The first martial artists learned their art on an intellectual level. They devoted themselves to meditative and intellectual pursuits before learning physical discipline. But this was merely a matter of practicality as well as culture.

 

In the western world most martial arts students learn the martial arts first on the physical level. Another way to describe this learning process is to say that the student learns the martial arts from the outside in, but this is in no way inferior to its oriental counterparts.

 

The students begin by first becoming aware of their bodies. Martial arts teach us to develop and discipline our bodies and make them able to respond to our commands.

 

The beginning student may believe he or she will not have much difficulty learning forms, at least superficially. At first, the student probably will have difficulty believing how something that appears so simple can be so profound. It has been said that learning forms is like learning the letters of the alphabet. Eventually, you will be using these letters to read and to write. As time passes, the student will be learning the lessons of the forms in every aspect of his or her life. This will become clear as you practice the forms over and over again, mastering them on several different levels.

 

In the beginning, we learn to execute the shortest, least complicated forms, and we learn to perform them slowly.

 

The emphasis is on precision. What you are attempting to do is to educate your body through forms, teaching it is to educate your body through forms, teaching it to do exactly what you tell it. Later we learn the longer, more complex forms. We continue to practice increasing our speed without losing our precision. We also learn to vary the intensity with which we perform the forms. As beginners, we practice these forms alone, without a partner. But as we become somewhat accomplished, we can then advance to sparring with a partner and engage in actual physical contact.

 

From those first moments we begin learning forms, we are putting into practice with our physical being the principles of the martial arts. And as time passes, the forms we have learned take on new meaning, as do the principles themselves. As we acquire discipline and begin to work with a partner, we immediately start to learn the true meaning of adaptability. You quickly learn how to relate your own movements to those of another individual. You begin to comprehend the nature of change, redirection of force, the feeling of dynamic balance, and the difference between hard and soft. By enacting various situations of confrontation through the forms, we begin to comprehend the nature of conflict, and we begin to learn how and when we can avoid it and what to do when we cannot.

 

As you master the forms they will become smooth and automatic, and you can see how you are expressing the basic martial arts principles and philosophy spontaneously through your body movements. You will notice that your mind and body will function as one. You begin to feel more “together”. The initial body awareness you acquire through the forms will soon begin to generalize throughout your entire being.

 

A student demonstration of a form – how precisely, definitively, and how completely he or she can do it - becomes an objective measurement of his ability. The student soon learns how well he or she is doing and so does his instructor. It is as if they are trying to mast a ballet step or a piano sonata. First must come technical perfection. After technical perfection, however, there is another step – using the forms in combination with another student or possibly at the highest levels, interpreting them for oneself.

 

Through the forms, martial arts students develop physical and mental discipline. They, in effect, become more physically and mentally fit. They develop balance, control, coordination, speed and agility. The student also develops strength and endurance, and learns about their own physical self. The student comes to understand the nature of motion and change. He or she also learns how to concentrate and empty their mind of conscious thought so that the body can move more spontaneously. Through the forms the martial arts student moves toward a greater unity of mind and body. They then are able to direct this energy towards other goals in life, whatever they may be.

 

As the martial arts student masters the forms he or she will come to realize that this learning process has touched them not only physically but also intellectually. Forms make use of your internal muscles as well as your external ones. This process not only gets the outside of your body into shape. It also exercises the muscles inside your abdomen and back, which support your internal organs.

 

Proper breathing is critical in the martial arts. You cannot do a form properly if you do not breathe properly. It is as much a part of the form as how you move your arms and legs. If you are only going through the external motions, you will not receive all of the benefits that the martial arts have to offer.

 

Through the forms we learn to increase or decrease our respiration rate, and control the amount of air we inhale and the manner in which we exhale. These breathing patterns create pressure against our internal organs and cause our musculature to move or to be exercised.

 

There is no other activity, which develops your body more completely than the martial arts. This is because forms make you move your body in every possible direction it can go. This means that you must move or exercise every single muscle group in each and every part of your body, inside and out.

 

The forms teach you to summon and direct your energy toward mental as well as physical tasks. You will be better able to clear your mind of extraneous thoughts, to concentrate, and you will also be better able to react more quickly to situations.

 

The goal of most Western physical activities is simple: to perfect the execution of that activity. But the purpose of the martial arts is very different. Initially you must acquire the necessary skill, and must perfect the activity – in effect, master the forms. But that is only the beginning. Look for the true meaning of the forms and you will see what is meant. They have a twofold goal. First; to teach you (through body movements) a practical philosophy of life, and second; to unify your body and your mind thereby incorporating the principles of that philosophy into your total being. More than any other physical activity the martial arts significantly affect your mental processes and influence the way you live your life. Who does not know any person who has truly committed himself or herself to the martial arts who has not experienced deep, lasting mental change!

 

Tae Kwon Do hyungs have been developed and perfected throughout the centuries by the outstanding teachers of the art. Each Hyung consists of the most logical movements of blocking, punching, striking or kicking possible within that sequence of movements. A student should not attempt to take on a new Hyung until he or she has perfected the hyungs he or she is required to learn at their new level of achievement. Before advancing to another Hyung it is customary for a student to perform the one he or she is presently learning at least 300 times.

 

Our GSW Martial Arts Academy “system” has a step in between red belt black stripe and 1st degree. We call this the “deputy” or probationary black belt. This fits well as we do not have a 9th Gup.

 

The “sanctioned” style we study is I.T.F. (International Tae Kwon Do Federation). The I.T.F. and W.T.F. are different in many ways. The W.T.F. style of sparring is used as the choice for the Olympics. Politics were the main influence of the two separate styles.

 

THE INTERPRETATIONS OF PATTERNS

 

The name of the pattern, the number of movements, and the diagrammatic symbol of each pattern symbolizes either heroic figures in Korean history or instances relating to historical events.

White Belt – 10th Gup

Hyung: CHON-JI

Meaning: “Heaven and Earth”. In the Orient, it is interpreted as the creation of the world or the beginning of human history. Therefore, it is the initial pattern learned by the beginner. This pattern consists of two similar parts – one to represent the Heaven and the other Earth.

19 Movements (“yell” at 17)

Yellow Belt – 8th Gup

Hyung: DAN-GUN

Meaning: was named after Dan-Gun, the legendary founder of Korea in the year 2333 B.C.

21 movements (“yell” at 8 and 17)

Orange Belt – 7th Gup

Hyung: DO-SAN

Meaning: was the pseudonym of the patriot Ahn Ch’ang-Ho (1876-1938) who devoted his entire life to furthering the education of Korea and its independence movement.

24 Movements (“yell” at 6 and 22)

 

Green Belt – 6th Gup

Hyung: WON-HYO

Meaning: was the noted monk who introduced Buddhism to the Silla Dynasty in the year of 686 A.D.

28 Movements (“yell” at 12 and 26)

 

Purple Belt – 5th Gup

Hyung: YUL -GOK

Meaning: was the pseudonym of a great philosopher and scholar Yi Il (1536-1584), nicknamed the “Confucius of Korea”. The 38 movements of this pattern refer to his birthplace on 38 degrees latitude and the diagram represents “scholar”.

38 Movements (“yell” at 21 and 36)

 

Blue Belt – 4th Gup

Hyung: JOON–GUN

Meaning: was named after the patriot Ahn Joong – Gun, who assassinated Hiro-Bumi Ito, the first Japanese governor-general of Korea, known as the man who played the leading part of the Korea-Japan merger. The 32 movements in the pattern represent Mr. Ahn’s age when he was executed at Lui-Shung prison (1910).

32 Movements (“yell” at 12 and 30)

 

Brown Belt – 3rd Gup

Hyung: TOI-GYE

Meaning: was the penname of the scholar Yi Hwang (16 A.D.), an authority on neo-Confucianism. The 37 movements of the pattern refer to his birthplace on 37 degrees latitude, the diagram represents “scholar”.

37 Movements (“yell” at 21 and 37)

Red Belt – 2nd Gup

Hyung: HWA-RANG

Meaning: was named after the Hwa-Rang youth group which originated in the Silla Dynasty about 1350 years ago. This group eventually became the actual driving force for the unification of the three kingdoms of Korea. The 29 movements refer to the 29th Infantry Division, where Tae Kwon Do developed into maturity.

29 Movements (“yell” at 1, 14, and 25)

 

Red Belt with Black Stripe – 1st Gup

Hyung: CHOONG-MOO

Meaning: was the given name to the great Admiral Yi Sun-Sin of the Yi Dynasty. He was reputed to have invented the first armored battleship (Kobukson), which was the precursor of the present day submarine in 1592 A.D. The reason why this pattern ends up with the left hand attack is to symbolize his regrettable death having no chance to show his unrestrained potentiality checked by the forced reservation of his loyalty to the king.

30 movements (“yell” at 9 and 30)

 

Black Belt Forms: (not in order)

 

KORYO: (World Tae Kwon Do Federation Black Belt Poomse meaning form. The English word Korea comes from the ancient dynasty called Koryo.)

The people of Koryo were known for great fortitude and they persistently defeated the Mongolian hordes that swept over most of the known world of that time. Koryo embodies the spirit of strong conviction.

48 Movements

 

KWANG-GAE: is named after the famous Kwang-Gae-Toh-Wang the 19th King of the Koguryo Dynasty who regained all the lost territories including the greater part of Manchuria. The diagram (+) represents the expansion and recovery of lost territory. The 39 movements refer to the first two figures of 391 AD, the year he came to the throne.

39 movements

 

PO-EUN: is the pseudonym of a loyal subject Chong Mong-Chu (1400) who was a famous poet and whose poem “I would not serve a second master though I might be crucified a hundred times” is known to every Korean. He was also a pioneer in the field of physics. The diagram (-) represents his unerring loyalty to the king and country towards the end of the Koryo Dynasty.

36 movements

 

GE-BAEK: is named after Ge-Baek, a great general in the Baek Je Dynasty (660 AD). The diagram (l) represents his severe and strict military discipline.

44 movements

 

EUI-AM: is the pseudonym of Son Byong Hi, leader of the Korean independence movement on March 1, 1919. The 45 movements refer to his age when he changed the name of Dong Hakko (Oriental Culture) to Chondo Kyo (Heavenly Way Religion) in 1905. The diagram (l) represents his indomitable spirit, displayed while dedicating himself to the prosperity of his nation.

45 movements

 

CHOONG-JANG: is the pseudonym given to General Kim Duk Ryang who lived during the Lee Dynasty, 14th century. This pattern ends with a left-hand attack to symbolize the tragedy of his death at 27 in prison before he was able to reach full maturity.

52 movements

 

JUCHE: is a philosophical idea that man is the master of everything and decides everything, in other words, the idea that man is the master of the world and his own destiny. It is said that this idea was rooted in Baekdu Mountain which symbolizes the spirit of the Korean people. The diagram (1) represents Baekdu Mountain.

45 movements

 

SAM-IL: Denotes the historical date of the independence movement of Korea which began throughout the country on March 1, 1919. The 33 movements in the pattern stand for the 33 patriots who planned the movement.

33 movements

YOO-SIN: is named after General Kim Yoo Sin, a commanding general during the Silla Dynasty. The 68 movements refer to the last two figures of 668 AD, the year Korea was united. The ready posture signifies a sword drawn on the right rather than left side, symbolizing Yoo Sin’s mistake of following his king’s orders to fight with foreign forces against his own nation.

68 movements

 

CHOI-YONG: is named after General Choi Yong, Premier and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed forces during the 14th century Koryo Dynasty. Choi Yong was greatly respected for his loyalty, patriotism, and humility. He was executed by his subordinate commanders headed by General Yi Sung Gae, who later become the first king of the Lee Dynasty.

46 movements

 

YON-GAE:

is named after a famous general during the Koguryo Dynasty, Yon Gae Somoon. The 49

movements refer to the last two figures of 649 AD, the year he forced the Tang Dynasty to quit attacking Korea after destroying nearly 300,000 of their troops at Ansi Sung.

49 movements

 

UL-JI:

is named after general Ul-Ji Moon Dok who successfully defended Korea against Tang’s invasion force of nearly one million soldiers led by Yang Je in 612 AD, Ul-Ji employing hit and run guerilla tactics, was able to decimate a large percentage of the force. The diagram (1) represents his surname. The 42 movements represents the author’s age when he designed the pattern.

42 movements

 

MOON-MOO:

Honors the 30th king of the Silla Dynasty. His body was buried near Dae Wang Am (Great King’s Rock). According to his will, the body was placed in the sea “Where my soul shall forever defend my land against the Japanese.” It is said that the Sok Gul Am (Stone Cave) was built to guard his tomb. The Sok Gul Am is a fine example of the culture of the Silla Dynasty. The 61 movements in this pattern symbolize the last two figures 661 AD when Moon Moo came to the throne.

61 movements

 

SO-SAN: is the pseudonym of the great monk Choi Hyong Ung (1520-1604) during the Lee Dynasty. The 72 movements refer to his age when he organized a corps of monk soldiers with the assistance of his pupil Sa Myung Dan. The monk soldiers helped repulse the Japanese pirates who overran most of the Korean peninsula in 1592.

72 movements

 

SE-JONG: is named after the greatest Korean king, Se Jong, who invented the Korean alphabet in 1443, and was also a noted meteorologist. The diagram ( ) represents the king, while the 24 movements refer to the 24 letters of the Korean alphabet.

24 movements

 

TONG-IL: denotes the resolution of the unification of Korea, which has been divided since 1945. The diagram ( l ) symbolizes the homogenous race.

56 movements

 

School Library

At GSW Martial Arts Academy, we firmly believe that exercising the mind is just as important as exercising the body. Because of this we have a Library of reference and information books. The topics of these books relate to aspects from all over the Martial Arts. These books can be checked out and used by the students for a proscribed period of time. The student that checked out the material will be responsible for replacing the material if the books are returned damaged or not returned at all. If, the book is not returned on time, the student will not be allowed to check any more books out until the late book is returned. Other students will need to benefit from the material so please be courteous.

 

Affiliation- Northland Karate

At GSW Martial Arts Academy, we take great pride in our affiliation with Northland Karate. We strive to uphold their traditions and standards. It is through Northland Karate that we are able to bring this curriculum to our students. For more information on Northland Karate, please visit www.northlandkarate.com.

 

*Disclaimer* We at GSW Martial Arts Academy strongly recommend that prospective students consult a physician BEFORE beginning any physical strenuous regiment. We ask that any limitations, ailments, or illnesses be disclosed before attending any regular class so that our instructors can accommodate special needs. It is also the student’s responsibility to ensure they properly warm up due to limited class time and space.

 

Korean Terminology (This is not an all inclusive list but Students are expected to know these terms and others as the instructor sees fit)

Counting

Hanah – One

Dool – Two

Set – Three

Net – Four

Dasot – Five

Yasot – Six

Ilgop – Seven

Yadol – Eight

Ahop – Nine

Yool - Ten

Yool-Hanah – Eleven

Yool-Dool – Twelve

Yool-Set – Thirteen

Yool-Net – Fourteen

Yool-Dasot – Fifteen

Yool-Yasot – Sixteen

Yool-Ilgop – Seventeen

Yool-Yadol – Eighteen

Yool-Ahop – Nineteen

Sumo – Twenty

Cha Ryut -----Attention

Kyung Nae---Bow

Choon-Bi – Ready Stance

Bahro- Return

Shio – At Ease

Shejak – Start

Goman – Stop/End

Hee-Cho-----Class dismissed

Sugo ---------It’s been a fine practice

Kamsahamnida----Thank You

Kihap- Shout/Yell

Assistant Instructor – Jokyo

Instructor – Gyosa (kyo-sa)

Master – Sabeomnim (Sabum-nim)

Grand Master- Kwanjangnim

 Do-Jang – Martial Arts School


 

Belt Requirements

 

GSW Martial Arts Academy

How to properly tie your belt.

 

When finished, Knott should face left. Rank stripes should be on your left. Black stripe awards should be on your left and color stripes should be on your right. Belt should look like one single belt all the way around the waist with no crisscross in the back.

   

WHITE BELT

Knowledge Base Cheat Sheet for GSW Martial Arts Academy

 

Class Pledge

1)       I will observe the tenets of Tae Kwon Do.



2)      
I will respect my instructor and all student ranks.



3)      
I will never misuse Tae Kwon Do.



4)      
I will be a champion for Freedom and Justice.



5)      
I will help to build a more peaceful world.

*end in “Sir” or “Ma’am” depending on the gender of the lead instructor.*

 

Ending Creed:

As a dedicated student of the martial arts, I will live my life by the Principals of Black Belt: Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect.

 

What does Tae Kwon Do mean? “The art of foot and hand”

What IS Tae Kwon Do? “The art of Self-Defense

What Style of Tae Kwon Do are we learning? Chang Hun

What are the Tenets of Tae Kwon Do? Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect

What does the color of your white belt mean? Innocence or no prior knowledge of Tae Kwon Do.

Is it ok to wash your belt? NO. Why? Because it symbolically washes away the experience we gain and we would have to start over.

 

Form Knowledge:

Chon-Ji Hyung: Heaven and Earth. 19 moves. Yell (or Kiah) on 17.

 

One Steps:

1)       Step out to the left into a horse stance facing opponent and execute a left hand push block above the elbow at the same time. Low punch right hand to the ribs. Low Punch left hand to the ribs. High punch right hand to the temple.

2)       Step out to the left at a 45 degree angle into a front stance and grab punch with right hand at the same time. Step up to closed stance with right foot and execute a right sidekick to the ribs while holding the punch. Step down with the right foot and step around inside with the left foot while continuing to hold the punch hand. Reach over the top of the held arm with the left hand bringing their arm in close and bending their elbow sliding your left hand under your armpit. Pull their right wrist over the top of their elbow while still maintaining your grip on the wrist and pull their wrist down and toward you into a gooseneck.

3)       Step straight forward into a right foot forward front stance. Left hand knife-hand block the punch while executing a right elbow strike to the jaw just below the ear at the same time. Grab the punch hand with the left hand. Take your right arm and wrap over the top of their punch arm and lock your right hand onto the top of your left wrist while continuing to hold their punch wrist. Swing right leg back out around behind you brining your opponent face down to the ground in a Kamura and step over them with your left foot while maintaining your grip on their punch arm.

 
 WHITE BELT

 

10th Gup

White Belt Color Meaning: Signifies innocence, as that of a beginning student who has no previous knowledge of Tae Kwon Do.

 

Hyung: CHON-JI

Meaning: “Heaven and Earth”. In the Orient, it is interpreted as the creation of the world or the beginning of human history. Therefore, it is the initial pattern learned by the beginner. This pattern consists of two similar parts – one to represent the Heaven and the other Earth.

19 Movements (“yell” at 17)

Hand Technique

1. Down block front stance.

2. Rising block front stance.

3. Outer forearm block front stance.

4. Solar plexus punch front stance.

5. Inner forearm block back stance.

 

Foot Technique

1. Front kick.

2. Roundhouse kick.

3. Side kick.

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1. Step out w/L leg, L hand push block, double punch ribs, R punch face, horse riding stance.
 

2. Step out w/L leg, R leg side kick, slide into joint lock (Goose Neck/come-along) with R Arm in standing position.

 

3.  Step Forward R leg front stance, R Elbow, Arm Bar R Arm, transition to Kimura in standing position.

Breaking Technique - Stepping side kick.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Rising kick

2. Crescent kicks (inside & outside)

3. Stepping side kick.

4. Flying side kick.

 

TIGERS (4 and 5 year olds) and DRAGONS (6 and 7 year olds)

 

Tigers (Learn 50% of White Belt curriculum)

Tiger Gold (White Belt with Gold Stripe)

Front kick.  Ready stance.  Front punch.

 

Tiger Orange (White Belt with Orange Stripe)

Down block in a front stance.  Back punch.

 

Tiger Green (White Belt with Green Stripe)

Combo “Tic Tac Toe” – Front punch, back punch, back leg front kick.

 

Dragon promotion:  1st 8 moves of Chon-Ji, recite pledge, creed, and belt knowledge.

 

Dragons (Learn 100% of White Belt curriculum)

Dragon Purple (White Belt with Purple Stripe)

Side kick.  Inner forearm block in a back stance.

 

Dragon Blue (White Belt with Blue Stripe)

Round kick.  Rising block front stance. 

 

Dragon Red (White Belt with Red Stripe)

Horse stance.   Outer forearm block front stance.

 

Dragon Brown (White Belt with Brown Stripe)

Combo “Kick Touch Punch” – Front leg front kick, front hand touch, back punch.

 

High White (White Belt with Black Stripe)

 

Dragons that have demonstrated 100% knowledge of White Belt curriculum will be promoted to high white belt and are encouraged to start attending regular Base Belt classes.  This is a transition period, so they’re able to attend a mixture of Tiger/Dragon and Base Belt classes until fully ready to move to Base Belt class.

 

YELLOW BELT

 

8th Gup

Yellow Belt Color Meaning: Signifies Earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as Tae Kwon Do’s foundation is being laid.

 

Hyung: DAN-GUN

Meaning: was named after Dan-Gun, the legendary founder of Korea in the year 2333 B.C.

21 movements (“yell” at 8 and 17)

Hand Technique

1. Down block, reverse punch.

2. Rising block, reverse punch.

3. Knife hand guarding block back stance.

4. Twin forearm guarding block back stance.

5. Knife hand strike (back stance).

 

Foot Technique

1. Jab, reverse punch, back leg roundhouse kick.

2. Step into side kick.

3. Back leg roundhouse kick, spin side kick.

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1.  Step out w/L leg (behind punch), L hand push block, reverse punch, R leg round kick to midsection.

2.  Standing Triangle Choke with Take Down Variation: Slide head under punch with left leg forward, R arm wrap around neck, R hand to left bicep, L arm to 90 degrees (answer phone), finish Triangle choke in standing position. Show same choke with take down variation.  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes19.htm

 3. Arm Bar from Mount: http://www.submissions101.com/armlocks12.htm
 

Breaking Technique - Spinning sidekick.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Spinning sidekick.

2. Jumping front kick.

 

ORANGE BELT

 

7th Gup

Orange Belt Color Meaning-Sun-as the seed needs the nurturing of the sun to grow, so does the skill that has sprouted.

Hyung: DO-SAN

Meaning: was the pseudonym of the patriot Ahn Ch’ang-Ho (1876-1938) who devoted his entire life to furthering the education of Korea and its independence movement.

24 Movements (“yell” at 6 and 22)

Hand Technique

1. Down block, reverse punch.

2. Rising block, reverse punch.

3. Outer forearm block, reverse punch.

4. Spear finger.

5. Knife hand strike (back stance).

 

Foot Technique

1. Back leg double round kick.

2. Step into hook kick, reverse punch.

3. Back leg roundhouse kick, spin sidekick, reverse punch.

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1.  Inside out crescent kick, other leg double round kick.

2. Standing Guillotine: Step out L leg, L arm outer block, R hand behind neck, R knee strike, finish to standing Guillotine Choke

 

3. Kimura from Guard: Duck under punch, shoot to takedown (45 deg) with both arms on ground in full guard, person with back on ground kips and performs Kimura on both arms.
 

Breaking Technique - Any hand or elbow technique.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Double roundhouse kick.

2. Stepping hook kick.

3. Step jump front kick.

 

GREEN BELT

 

6th Gup

Green Belt Color Meaning: signifies the plant’s growth as the Tae Kwon Do skill begins to develop.

 

Hyung: WON-HYO

Meaning: was the noted monk who introduced Buddhism to the Silla Dynasty in the year of 686 A.D.

28 Movements (“yell” at 12 and 26)

Hand Technique

1. Down block, double punch.

2. Rising block, double punch.

3. Knife hand guarding block back stance, switch to front stance, reverse punch.

4. Twin fore arm block, reverse knife hand slap chest, punch in back stance.

5. Outer forearm block, down block, reverse punch (front stance).

 

Foot Technique

1. Double front kick, reverse punch.

2. Switch feet back leg round kick, spin hook kick all the way around, reverse punch.

3. Switch feet back leg front kick, spin crescent kick all the way around, reverse punch.

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1.  Outside in crescent kick, other leg spin hook kick all the way around.

2.  Rear-naked Choke (fist to fist):  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes5.htm

3. Anaconda Choke:  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes4.htm
 

Breaking Technique Spin hook or heel kick.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Spin crescent kick

2. Spin hook kick

3. Spin heel kick.

 

PURPLE BELT

 

5th Gup

Purple Belt Color Meaning-Majestic Mountains-The path of the student becomes steep like a mountain path as the tree is in mid growth.

Hyung: YUL -GOK

Meaning: was the pseudonym of a great philosopher and scholar Yi Il (1536-1584), nicknamed the “Confucius of Korea”. The 38 movements of this pattern refer to his birthplace on 38 degrees latitude and the diagram represents “scholar”.

38 Movements (“yell” at 21 and 36)

Hand Technique

1. Down block rising block back stance, switch to front stance reverse punch.

2. Open hand circle down, reverse ridge hand (front stance).

3. Searching block twice-punch (front stance).

4. Knife hand guarding block, outer forearm block back stance, switch to front stance reverse punch.

5. Knife hand strike horse riding stance, square punch, front punch (alternate hands).

 

Foot Technique

1. Rear leg front kick waist, round kick head, reverse punch.

2. Step in hook kick round kick, reverse punch.

3. Switch feet axe kick, jump spin side kick, reverse punch.

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1.  Grab wrist w/L hand, step in w/L foot lift arm up and knuckle uppercut to ribs, sweep leg w/L foot R leg axe kick to solar plexus.

2. Knuckle Choke from Mount: http://www.submissions101.com/chokes38.htm

 

3. Knee Bar from Guard:  http://www.submissions101.com/leglocks10.htm
  

Breaking Technique - Step in hook kick (one hand hold for “extra credit”).

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Front kick, round kick (same leg).

2. Switch feet axe kick.

3. Step in hook kick, round kick.

4. Jump spin sidekick.

 

BLUE BELT

 

4th Gup

Blue Belt Color Meaning: Signifies the Heaven towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in Tae Kwon Do progresses.

 

Hyung: JOON–GUN

Meaning: was named after the patriot Ahn Joong – Gun, who assassinated Hiro-Bumi Ito, the first Japanese governor-general of Korea, known as the man who played the leading part of the Korea-Japan merger. The 32 movements in the pattern represent Mr. Ahn’s age when he was executed at Lui-Shung prison (1910).

32 Movements (“yell” at 12 and 30)

Hand Technique

1. Down block, palm heel, punch low, punch high (alternate hands w/ea. technique) all done in front stance.

2. Down block back stance, switch to front stance reverse knife hand, punch low, punch high.

3. Reverse ridge hand back stance, front leg front kick, then step forward with circular upper pressing block in cat stance.

4. Lower cross block, twin vertical punch, rear elbow strike (front stance).

5. Rear leg side kick, knife hand strike horse riding stance, square punch, then front punch.

 

Foot Technique

1. Step into jump round kick.

2. Step into jump inside out crescent kick.

3. Back leg double round kick, spin sidekick, jump spin crescent kick (alternate legs each kick).

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1.  L hand push block, L foot double round kick, other leg jump spin crescent kick

2.  Americana Key Lock:  http://www.submissions101.com/armlocks19.htm

3. Three Points of Death Triangle Drill:  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes36.htm (Leg Triangle at Minimum)

 

Breaking Technique -Jump into round kick.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Jump spin crescent kick.2. Step into jump round kick.

3. Step into jump inside out crescent kick.

 

 BROWN BELT

3rd Gup

Brown Belt Color Meaning: Roots- The tree is firmly rooted in the earth just as the student now has deep roots in the skill of Tae kwon Do.

Hyung: TOI-GYE

Meaning: was the penname of the scholar Yi Hwang (16th Century A.D or 1501 to 1570AD.), an authority on neo-Confucianism. The 37 movements of the pattern refer to his birthplace on 37 degrees latitude, the diagram represents “scholar”.

37 Movements (“yell” at 21 and 37)

Hand Technique

1. Double augmented block back stance, switch to front stance front hand inner forearm block, other arm down block.

2. Down block back stance, switch to front stance reverse arm down block, switch to back stance reverse arm outer block, then knife hand strike with front hand.

3. Low knife hand guarding block back stance, switch to front stance circle block.

4. Down block low front stance, twin vertical punch, back leg front kick, reverse punch, front punch.

5. Double punch front stance, spin knife hand strike back stance.

 

Foot Technique

1. Step into side kick round kick, reverse punch.

2. Round kick high side kick low, reverse punch.

3. Tornado kick, spin hook kick all the way around, reverse punch.

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1.  Step back push block, tornado kick, spin hook kick.

 2.  Heel Hook from Guard:  http://www.submissions101.com/leglocks5.htm

3. Crucifix from Side Control:  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes10.htm

Breaking Technique - Jump spin sidekick. (2 boards)

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Step into round kick.

2. Tornado kick.

3. Round kick sidekick.

4. Side kick round kick.

 

RED BELT

 

2nd Gup

Red Belt Color Meaning- Danger- cautioning the student to exercise control, and warning the opponent to stay away.

Hyung: HWA-RANG

Meaning: was named after the Hwa-Rang youth group which originated in the Silla Dynasty about 1350 years ago. This group eventually became the actual driving force for the unification of the three kingdoms of Korea. The 29 movements refer to the 29th Infantry Division, where Tae Kwon Do developed into maturity.

29 Movements (“yell” at 1, 14, and 25)

Hand Technique

1. Jab in a fighting stance, move forward circling knife hand strike down in a back stance.

2. From fighting stance, move forward jab, front hook, reverse uppercut, reverse hook punch.

3. Double palm heel strikes to the face, double knife hand strikes to the sides looking to the front side then reverse arm side, then looking forward twin reverse knife hand strikes to the neck.

4. Jump spin knife hand strike, reverse punch (twist hips into punch).

 

Foot Technique

1. Spin round kick, put the leg down forward, front leg round kick high, round kick mid, then reverse punch.

2. Spin side kick low, round kick high, put leg down forward, reverse uppercut, front hand hook punch.

3. Switch feet rear leg hook kick, put leg down forward, jump spin hook kick all the way around, reverse cross elbow.

4. Switch feet front kick using the power of the hips, spin hook kick round kick, put the leg down forward, front hand open to the face, reverse punch same time (blast forward).

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1.  Outside in crescent kick, spin hook kick, round kick.

2. The Toe Hold from the Guard:  http://www.submissions101.com/leglocks6.htm

 

3. Gogoplata (Shin Choke) from the Guard: http://www.submissions101.com/chokes7.htm
 

Breaking Technique: Any two techniques combining minimum of 3 boards or one technique with 4 boards.

 

Kicks to Learn: 1. Spin double sidekick. 2. Spin side kick round kick. 3. Spin hook kick round kick. 4. Spin round kick 5. Tornado round kick. 6. Jump spin hook kick.

 

RED BELT / BLACK STRIPE (Conditional)

 

1st Gup

Hyung: CHOONG-MOO

Meaning: was the given name to the great Admiral Yi Sun-Sin of the Yi Dynasty. He was reputed to have invented the first armored battleship (kobukson), which was the precursor of the present day submarine in 1592 A.D. The reason why this pattern ends up with the left hand attack is to symbolize his regrettable death having no chance to show his unrestrained potentiality checked by the forced reservation of his loyalty to the king.

30 movements (“yell” at 9 and 30)

Hand Technique

1. Reverse arm push down block front stance, step up behind front foot with rear leg to ball of foot, reverse punch across body, then step forward with front foot, hook punch reverse punch.

2. Double down block, double inner forearm block, reverse arm palm heel strike to face (front stance), reverse punch midsection, then front punch to face.

3. Front hand reverse knife hand strike to collar bone, pull back eye attack, jump spin hook kick, drop spin leg sweep, reverse punch.

4. Front stance reverse ridge hand with front hand, reverse hand knife hand down block, then switch hands, drop spin side kick, reverse punch, then up to fighting stance.

 

Foot Technique

1. 360° sidekick.

2. Front leg jump hook, front leg side kick round kick hook kick, blasting forward reverse punch.

3. Tornado round kick, front hand jab and hook punch, reverse uppercut and hook punch.

4. Jump spin round kick, dropping the kicking leg forward spin hook kick round kick head level, side kick belt level.

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

1.  Step back low knife hand guarding block, 360° side kick.

2.  Hip Push Sweep from Stacking Open Guard:  http://www.submissions101.com/sweeps50.htm

3. Full Nelson Escape into Arm Bar:  http://www.submissions101.com/selfdefense15.htm
 

Breaking Technique - 1. Jump spin hook kick (1 board, single hand hold).

2. 360° side kick (2 boards). 3. Palm heel strike (brick or boards as determined by instructors)

 

Kicks to Learn

1. 360°-side kick. 2. Jump spin round kick.

3. Spin hook kick, round kick, sidekick

  

BLACK BELT REPORT AND SPARRING

 

The Tae Kwon Do report will consist of 5-8 pages. Single sided, double-spaced. The subject should be something about their “journey through the Martial Arts” and should have some research ideas and a bit of History of their “Art” included. What they thought of before they started, why they started. Was it different than your expectations? What was happening during the transformation of a beginner student, to intermediate, to a black belt? What does black belt mean to you? What did Tae Kwon Do do for you? What do you see happening with you and Tae Kwon Do in the future? The report needs a title page, bibliography, and a plastic sheet protector binder. The rough draft needs to be handed in a minimum of one month before student intends to test, so the instructor can proof read it, approve it, and give it back for corrections if needed. The final Copy will be kept by the Academy for record. Any student testing for any level of black belt needs to give their intentions of testing to their instructor a minimum of 2 months of projected test date.

 

A black belt should have the best control of any student. SELF CONTROL IS OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE! Our GSW Martial Arts Academy rule will be minimal to no head contact whatsoever with any student that is a blue belt or lower in rank even if the student has head gear on. Self-control is always needed and especially when the sparring partner is of lesser ability. The discipline of oneself to perform pushups immediately after accidental contact after an apology and insurance of the other being all right will be our necessary action if we are a sparring student. Someone that likes to “hit”, will also be able to “take a hit”.

 

Always remember to take pride in self-control, that it takes extremely more skill to come close to the target with a quick technique, than actually hitting that target.

DEPUTY BLACK BELT OR PROBATIONARY BLACK BELT

 

NOTE: This belt can be taken away from the student by the promotion board if determined necessary.

 

KORYO

World Tae Kwon Do Federation Black Belt Poomse (word for form).

 

The English word Korea comes from the ancient dynasty called Koryo.

 

The people of Koryo were known for great fortitude and they persistently defeated the Mongolian hordes that swept over most of the known world of that time. Koryo embodies the spirit of strong conviction.

48 Movements

 

Recommended Self-Defense Techniques

Tae Kwon Do students make up their own one-steps and three steps. Two that are submission, two take downs, and two free style. It is recommended that the student study the other self-defense techniques from all belt levels.

 

Kicks

360 Crescent kick

360 Hook kick

Flying double side kick

Jumping front kick

 

Breaking

Flying double side kick on heavy bag

Jumping front kick

One Brick

Other breaks as determined by examining board.

 

Other Requirements

Minimum six months training time and teaching is required to reach 1st degree.

 

 Black belts should be teaching beginner students.

 

 

Reading of the book, “A Book of Five Rings”.

 

Black Belt Curriculum

The purpose of this document is to define the black belt curriculum of GSW Martial Arts Academy. Like all ranks, black belts are expected to know all of the material for all lower ranks. The reason that the black belt curriculum is considered separately is because of the flexible nature of advanced training. Before getting into details, several assumptions must be explained.

 

1) Black belts must be both students and teachers. Just as it is unacceptable for a black belt never to teach class, it is unacceptable for a black belt never to take class. The classes that black belts take may not be the same classes that lower ranks take, and they may not take them as the same frequency, but black belts are expected to take class regularly.

 

2) What is “required” of one student will be required of all students. There will be no exceptions. Having universal requirements precludes there being higher value placed on one student’s rank compared to another’s. This is not to say that some students won’t be pushed harder in some areas than others, and other students pushed differently. This will be according to the student’s aptitude and interest.

 

Promotions for black belts are more a function of experience (e.g. “time at rank”) and maturity than merely meeting the written requirements. For example, even if the requirement for a student’s next rank is to learn three forms and teach 50 classes (for example), this doesn’t mean that the student can reach the requirement in a month by learning the forms quickly and teaching several classes per day for several weeks.

 

In general, the amount of time it takes from one black belt rank to the next is the next degree, in years. For example, two years from first to second, three years from second to third, and so on. There are exceptions, of course, but this rule of thumb will be followed in all but extreme circumstances.

 

Forms

Please refer to the general curriculum requirements for details on which forms are required for each rank. It is expected that black belts will continue to practice the forms from their previous ranks with the goal of continuous improvement. At each belt level, a student should learn not only the new form for their next rank, but also learn more about the forms from previous ranks. This is especially true for black belts who are expected to teach as part of their training.

 

Self-Defense

Black belts are expected to be competent at as many of the techniques that make up the school’s self-defense body of knowledge (SD BoK) as practical. Clearly, as new techniques are introduced to the SD BOK, it will take time for them to proliferate around to all students. However, the main expectation of black belts is to demonstrate in-depth knowledge and extreme proficiency at a sub-set of the SD BoK. The higher the rank, the larger the sub-set required.

 

Sparring

Sparring is, first and foremost, an exercise in control and black belts are expected to have

exemplary control. Students should understand that control is the ability to strike only as hard as intended regardless of what their partner does. “He walked into it” does excuse having hit someone too hard! Safety is always first. Please refer to the student handbook for sparring equipment requirements.

 

Teaching

Black belts are expected to pass along what they learn by teaching lower belts. This does not necessarily mean leading class as the “head instructor.” Helping the head instructor by working with a sub-set of the class is fine. It is understood that there is a finite number of classes and we do not want to define a requirement that is untenable. The goal is for the black belt to have experience working with lower belts to ensure that he/she stays connected with the school and its primary constituents: the students. This will also ensure that the black belt stays current with any changes to the lower belt curriculum, though these changes won’t occur very often.

 

Research Paper

All students testing for first degree black belt are expected to write a paper on their own journey in the martial arts. For ranks beyond first degree, students are expected to do research into other areas. Suffice it to say that the paper must be more than a book report or a personal story and should help the reader not only to better understand another area of the martial arts, but also to better understand the author. The length required and whether a topic is acceptable are up to the school’s senior black belts and should be discussed with them in advance.

 

Beyond TKD

GSW Martial Arts Academy is, at the end of the day, a martial arts school. Our curriculum may be based on traditional Taekwondo, but our training is not exclusive to it. The integration of Brazilian Ju-Jitsu into the SD BoK and the availability of Okinawan Kenpo Kobudo classes are evidence of that. Black belts are expected to seek out knowledge in other arts and use that knowledge to enhance the school. This may be as simple as taking a one-day seminar and adding to the SD BoK, or as complex as earning rank in another style then comparing and contrasting its philosophy with that of TKD.

 

The Research Writing and Beyond TKD requirements may be combined. For example, the students takes a seminar in Capoeira, writes about a paper that combines the history of that art with the student’s experience, and adapts a Capoeira technique that contributes to the SD BoK.

 

Interview

A face-to-face interview with senior black belts will be part of the black belt promotion process. This interview will cover a discussion of the candidate’s training, teaching philosophy, research paper, and future goals. It may include actual demonstrations of forms and techniques, but will NOT be in front of an audience. The goal is for the senior black belts to fully evaluate the candidate’s readiness for promotion, not be a spectacle for others to witness.

 

Curriculum

The purpose of this document is to define the regular (non-Dragons) curriculum of GSW Martial Arts Academy. The curriculum can be divided into three general categories: forms, self-defense, and sparring. (Note that the weapons class may be optional and its curriculum and ranking system are independent.) The remainder of this document will describe each of those categories and define the curriculum requirements at each rank. Assume that what is given at each rank is required to test for next higher rank, along with the curriculum for all previous ranks.

 

In addition to learning the curriculum, students are also expected to attend class regularly and gain a certain level of experience at each rank prior to testing for their next rank. For higher ranks, this may also include teaching experience. Specific requirements in these regards will not be stated, but suffice it to say that proper knowledge of the curriculum below is a necessary, but not a sufficient, requirement for testing. Of course, a proper attitude is also required for any promotion, so students are reminded to adhere to the tenets of Taekwondo as stated in the student handbook.

 

Forms

The forms, or hyung, of traditional Taekwondo are its identity. Each form has aspects of it that have meaning beyond kicking and punching, as described in the student handbook. The form(s) required at each belt level is/are as follows:

 

 

White: Chon-Ji

Yellow: Dan-Gun

Orange: Do-San

Green: Won-Hyo

Purple: Yul-Gok

Blue: Joon-Gun

Brown: Toi-Gye

Red: Hwa-Rang

Red/black stripe: Choong-Moo

 

Probationary Black Belt – Koryo and special requirements as stated above.

 

 

1st Degree Black: Kwang-Gae,

2nd Degree Black: Po-Eun, Ge-Baek

3rd Degree Black: Choong-Jang, Eui-Am, 1- Self Created Musical Form

4th Degree Black through 9th Degree Black TBD by Grandmaster

 

 

Learning a form is done in stages. The first stage is to be able to follow along in class and

properly execute each technique, with the instructor describing each count. The second stage is to be able to do the same without the instructor describing each count, but still counting. The third is to be able to do the same without the instructor counting. The fourth stage is to be able to confidently execute each technique with appropriate timing on one’s own, that is, without anyone else doing the same form and without any input from the instructor. It is this fourth stage that is required to successfully test for the next rank.

 

Each student will have his or her own way of doing each form. There are some absolutes with regard to correctness, but, in general, students are encouraged to ensure that their way is their way and not just a mimic of someone else’s. For example, the first two moves in Chon-Ji are to turn ninety degrees to the left into a left-foot-forward front stance and do a left-hand down block, then aim with the left hand, step forward into a right-foot-forward front stance, and do a right-hand mid-section straight punch. Doing an outer block or a back stance would be wrong, but foregoing the aim or punching slightly higher or lower is not. The former is a matter of executing the right kind of technique; the latter is a personal preference as to how that technique is executed.

 

In addition to knowing the techniques of each form, students are also expected to know the definition for each form, the number of movements in each form, and the movement numbers on which a yell is expected. This information can be found in the student handbook. Students are also expected to understand the application of the techniques in each form. It is how each technique can be applied to a self-defense situation that differentiates martial arts forms practice from dance. It is expected that students will continue to practice the forms from their previous ranks with the goal of continuous improvement. At each belt level, a student should learn not only the new form for their next rank, but also learn more about the forms from previous ranks.

 

Self-Defense

Self-defense is, and should be, a significant component to any martial arts curriculum. GSW Martial Arts Academy is no different in this regard. What is required for students to be promoted from rank to rank is not a prescribed set of self-defense techniques, but rather a prescribed number of techniques. This will allow students to focus on techniques that are meaningful to them and give instructors flexibility to teach to each student such techniques.

 

Each student, starting at white belt, is expected to learn three new self-defense techniques prior to testing for their next rank. This means that white belts are expected to know three, yellow belts are expected to know six, orange belts are expected to know nine, and so forth. In this case, “know” means the ability to instruct a fellow student (or instructor) what they are to do as an “attacker” and then properly, and safely, execute the technique as a “defender.”

 

Over time, the school will expand its body of knowledge of self-defense techniques, which will give the students more choices. Any technique that can be properly, and safely, executed in the school will be acceptable. Students are encouraged to help the school expand its body of knowledge by working with instructors to introduce new techniques.

 

Sparring

Sparring is, first and foremost, an exercise in control. Students are expected to exhibit control of their techniques in any and all line sparring and free sparring situations. Line sparring is when partners are given pre-defined technique to use in an attack/defend/counter-attack situation, then practice by alternating roles. Free sparring is when students are free to choose their own techniques for attack and must defend against their partner’s.

 

There are no technique requirements for sparring, only participation and demonstration of control. A student may be denied promotion for refusal to participate in sparring. There are, of course, medical exceptions to this. Any student with a medical reason for non-participation should make it clear to their instructor prior to testing. A student may also be denied promotion for lack of proper control during sparring. Students should understand that control is the ability to strike only as hard as intended regardless of what their partner does. “He walked into it” does excuse having hit someone too hard! Safety is always first. Please refer to the student handbook for sparring equipment requirements.

 

 

 

GSW MARTIAL ARTS ACADEMY
MMA
STUDENT HANDBOOK



What is MMA? 


What is MMA?  MMA is a form of unarmed combat, or Mixed Martial Arts, which has been developed over the past several decades. For an MMA Fighter, the entire body is a weapon, and one is easily able to attack, counter-attack and submit an opponent with hands, fists, elbows, knees, or feet. These attacks can be done from a stand up position, in close fighting, and from a ground position using various proven methods and techniques. MMA is meant to be a method of competition in a ring or cage, and should never be used outside of a ring or cage except to defend oneself or someone who is unable to defend their self and only if “reasonable force” is used. Only after an opponent launches an attack does the practitioner defend with a counter-attack. Inside the ring or cage it’s a completely different story. The ultimate goal is to win.

 

However, MMA has become a worldwide trend and even those that are not intending to ever get into the ring are jumping on the bandwagon. There are many schools, like GSW Martial Arts Academy, that offer an MMA program for Fitness Training and Self Defense as well as for Amateur Fighting and Professional Fighting. People around the world are converging on Gyms and Training Facilities to begin their training to become Fit, Strong, and Healthy using the same programs the professional fighters use.

 

For most, MMA training becomes a philosophy or way of life, which compliments the physical grace and power of their fighting skills. With GSW Martial Arts Academy we implement a philosophy that can best be described as seriously trying to observe seven tenets, in all areas of life and not just while inside the training center. GSW Martial Arts Academy uses all seven of these Tenets to enhance our training environment and help keep our MMA Students well grounded inside and outside the training hall. The Tenets we follow are Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect.

 

MMA uses many different techniques or styles mixed into one fighting format. There are three reasons for this. We have to be able to attack or defend from a distance. This is done through the use of Tae Kwon Do and Muay Thai. We have to be able to defend and attack in close proximities which are accomplished through the use of Boxing, Aikido, Muay Thai, and Judo techniques. We also have to be able to defend and attack while on the ground which is done through the use of Freestyle Brazilian and Japanese Ju-Jitsu. Here at GSW Martial Arts Academy, all of these aspects are developed into our program.

 

Tremendous skill and control are required in MMA. While blocking, kicking, grappling and punching techniques all contribute to making MMA one of the most exciting and competitive sports; its challenge lies in the adept use of techniques without seriously harming an opponent. Complete control over the body and stopping just short of injuring someone become paramount in the ability for the student and their opponent to be able to enter the ring again to compete at another time and venue. For Fitness Training this is even more paramount to ensure the students can all leave in the same condition that they were in when they arrived. No one wants to miss work or family life due to an injury sustained inside the training hall and all students are to use utmost control to ensure that injuries do not happen.

 

Through the coordination of control, balance, and technique in the performance of competitions), MMA is quickly becoming known as a highly skilled Martial Art in itself even though it is comprised of many types of arts. It is also one of the most all-around methods of physical fitness. It utilizes every single muscle of the body and is considered the ultimate in unarmed self-defense. It is quickly becoming one of the most practiced sports in the world.

 

The style of Tae Kwon Do we incorporate into our MMA program at GSW Martial Arts Academy is called Chang Hun. Chang Hun is the penname under which General Choi Hong Hi, the founder of modern – day Tae Kwon Do used to write his papers.

 

In our MMA program we strive to follow the philosophy and teaching of Tae Kwon Do. Some of this is outlined here in this handbook.

 

Tae Kwon Do is more than an art of action.

 

Tae Kwon Do is a physical expression of the human will for survival and an activity to fulfill the spiritual desires of man. Basically, all the actions in Tae Kwon Do are developed from the human instinct for self-defense reinforced with positive elements as needs arise, and ultimately reach the absolute state to overcome the ego and arrive at the moment of perfection, thus giving the sport a philosophical dimension.

 

 

Sports Value of MMA - The Ostensible Meaning – MMA is a Comprehensive Physical Sport.

 

MMA is an overall physical sport. In it, one has to move all the muscles and joints of the human body. People become devoted to sports from various necessities, to adapt to their environment and preservation of life, and because they revere life. The necessities include those for physical survival in the human habitat and also those to harmonize with the inner demands for preservation of balance. MMA is a sport that responds and adapts rationally to survival needs inside and outside of the ring and also maintains an orderly system uniformly related to the inner or outer environments of the human being.

 

MMA is both a simple and a complex series of movements comprised of highly related postures of systematic, scientific acts to move all parts of the body in various ways as necessities arise comprised of many different art styles. Therefore, MMA has become an essential element to preserve and maintain the order of human functions.

 

“Karate” is a Japanese word that means “empty hands” and should not be mistaken for the art of Tae Kwon Do and both of these are mere aspects of what comprises Modern Day MMA.

 

Origin and Formation of MMA

 

All animals, as well as human beings have strong instincts to protect themselves. For instance, when someone tries to harm another person, he dodges or crouches to protect the vital parts of the body instinctively. The basis of MMA is considered to have derived from variations of such passive postures for self-defense and body preservation.

 

The origin of MMA goes back to the early days that the human race existed on earth. As a means of life, MMA has grown and developed from many different traditions and postures and gradually formalized into the sport we know today. One of the earliest examples of Modern Day MMA in Cinema was in the movie “Enter the Dragon” starring Bruce Lee. At the beginning of the movie he is shown exhibiting different styles of martial arts mixed together in a healthy training format and competition.

 

Diversification of life reflects the degree of civilization, pre-conditioned by satisfaction of demand and needs. At first physical strength to survive in the difficulty of the environment was required. Preventive measures to protect oneself from outer assaults and expansion of living conditions became a necessity. The reason that MMA was developed from various types of martial arts into an aggressive art or sport derives from such social transitions.

 

MMA has matured into the present format through a process of developments based on experience, wisdom and imagination and the desire to be the best all around fighter.

 

Training Hall

 

A training hall throughout time has been called by many different names. Examples of some of these are Do-Jo, Do-Jang, and Gym. Traditionally it has been an area where young and old, men and women, regardless of race or creed, come to learn Martial Arts for the promotion of their mental, moral, physical, and cultural education. It should be a place where a certain “esprit de corps” between members can be established with a common goal of promoting and cultivating a noble character. Certainly to fill the prerequisites necessary to attain these ideas, a well-trained instructor (preferably a Black Belt in one style or another) is needed. This is a primary consideration. The hall itself must also have the facilities, equipment, and strict regulations to help discipline the student’s mind and body. The size of the training hall and equipment to be used can be flexible according to the circumstances and individual choice. Again, the only thing that cannot be compromised is the quality of the instructor.

 

Practice Suit

 

Practice suits can come in many different styles and colors. Traditional Martial Arts use a formalized uniform to practice in. Karate uses a “Gi”. Tae Kwon Do uses a Pull over type Do-Bok. Ju-Jitsu uses a thicker special weave “Gi” for grappling. Muay Thai uses Shorts only. Here at GSW Martial Arts we will primarily use “fight shorts” and a “rash guard” for training MMA. While most MMA competitions have fighters wear shorts only, GSW Martial Arts understands the need for Modesty and asks that t-shirts or “rash guards” be worn during training.

 

Our program will also issue belt rankings as an incentive program to show progress in our students but the belts will not be required to be worn during practices. They will however be required to be worn on testing days.

 

Grade and degree changes, which are noted with belt color, create incentive while at the same time preserving humility and structure in the training hall.

 

It is extremely practical and healthy to keep your training gear clean.

 

Student Belt

The Students belt is to remain tied properly at all times. If the belt should come untied during class, the student is to bow and turn around and face away from the instructor and re-tie it properly. The Knott is to be tied properly and should ALWAYS face to the left. ‘Traditional Karate” ties the belt facing to the right to symbolize power. This can easily be misunderstood as aggression. The Knott being tied to the left symbolizes Defense. Since our MMA program is based on Defense and Fitness, it would go against the nature of how we train for the belt to be tied facing to the right.

 

It is NOT acceptable to wash the belt. Tradition indicates that if you wash the belt, you wash away the experience earned while wearing the belt. The belt should not be permitted to drag the floor. The belt should be held and worn as a badge of honor for all of the achievements and the experiences the student has earned. Each Color has a meaning behind it and part of the progression for each student is to understand what those meanings are. By disrespecting the belt, it is an indication that the student does not respect the meaning of the belt or the training that they are receiving.

PERSONAL PROTECTION

During classes all males will be required to wear groin protection. All Students will be required to wear a mouth guard. As we train, a mouth guard restricts air flow in and out of the body.  By wearing the mouth guard at all times will ensure that we as students adapt to the restriction easier to help prepare us as if we were actually getting into the ring.

 

As always the endeavor to stay safe is important.

 

No students should wear jewelry or piercings while training. While we at GSW Martial Arts understand the need for individuality, we feel the need for safety out-weighs the need for fashion and asks that all jewelry and piercings be removed before training.

 

DISCIPLINARY ACTION WILL BE TAKEN FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE TRAINING HALL RULES AND REGULATIONS.

 

PENALTIES WILL VARY AT THE DISCRETION OF THE INSTRUCTOR, SUCH AS: DEMOTION OF RANK, SUSPENSION, OR EVEN TERMINATION OF TRAINING.

Students Attitude

 

1. Student should never tire of learning. A good student can learn anywhere, anytime. This is the secret of knowledge.

2. A good student must be willing to sacrifice for his art and instructor. Many students feel that their training is a commodity bought with monthly dues and are unwilling to take part in demonstrations, teaching, and working around the training hall. An instructor can afford to lose this type of student.

3. Always set a good example for lower ranking belt students. It is only natural they will attempt to emulate senior students.

4. Always be loyal and never criticize the instructor, training hall, equipment, or the teaching methods.

5. If an instructor teaches a technique, practice it and attempt to utilize it.

6. Remember that a student’s conduct outside the training hall reflects on the art, the instructor, and our school...

7. If a student adopts a technique from another training hall it is always encouraged to share and adapt it into their training program. If the instructor disapproves of it, however, the student must discard it immediately or adapt it into a technique that the instructor will approve of.

8. Never be disrespectful to the instructor. Though a student is allowed to disagree with the instructor, the student must first follow the instruction and discuss the matter with the instructor at a later time. Disputes during class are a disruption and will not be tolerated.

9. Any complaints should be taken directly to the instructor, not into a side conversation with other students or during class time.

10. A student must always be eager to learn and ask questions. A student should never be afraid to ask questions. Questions are a wonderful tool for learning.

 

The Tenets

Here at GSW Martial Arts we incorporate a philosophy that promotes good sportsmanship and morality into our training. In our schools tradition, these tenets should be used inside the training hall as well as outside the hall.

 

The tenets should serve as a guide for all serious students of Martial Arts. At GSW Martial Arts Academy, We use 7 tenants which consist of Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect. We believe that the use of all 7 tenets equal Humility and that Humility is required to become a proper Black Belt and also keep us in the proper training frame of mind.

 

MODESTY - MMA students are expected to be humble about their accomplishments. Those who flaunt their achievements may have physical power, but their achievements are hollow, for they lack the spirit of MMA. The Yin cannot exist without the Yang, so MMA cannot exist without the Spirit. This means being free of vanity and conceit. A student should not boast about merits or achievements.

COURTESY - It can be said that courtesy is an unwritten regulation prescribed by ancient teacher of philosophy as a means to enlighten human beings while maintaining a harmonious society. It can further be, as an ultimate criterion, required of a mortal.

 

MMA students should attempt to practice the following elements of courtesy to build up noble character and to conduct the training in an orderly manner, as well.

 

1. To promote the spirit of mutual concessions

2. To be ashamed of one’s vices, contempting those of other’s

3. To be polite to one another

4. To encourage the sense of justice and humanity

5. To distinguish the instructor from the student, senior from junior, and elder from younger

 

INTEGRITY - In MMA, the word integrity assumes a looser definition than the one usually presented in Webster’s dictionary.

 

One must be able to define right and wrong and have the conscience, if wrong, to feel guilt. Listed are some examples, where integrity is lacking:

 

1. The instructor who misrepresents himself and his art by presenting improper techniques to his students because lack of knowledge or apathy.

2. The student who misrepresents himself by “fixing” breaking materials before demonstrations.

3. The instructor who camouflages bad techniques with luxurious training halls and false flattery to his students.

4. The student who requests rank from an instructor, or attempts to purchase it.

5. The student who gains rank for ego purposes or the feeling of power.

6. The instructor that teaches and promotes his art for materialistic gains.

7. The student who feels ashamed to seek opinions from his juniors.

 

PERSEVERANCE - There is an old Oriental saying, “Patience leads to virtue or merit.” “One can make a peaceful home by being patient for 100 times.” Certainly, happiness and prosperity are most likely brought to the patient person. To achieve something, whether it is a higher degree or the perfection of a technique, one must set his goal, and then constantly persevere. Robert Bruce learned his lesson of perseverance from the persistent efforts of a lowly spider. It was this perseverance and tenacity that finally enabled him to free Scotland in the fourteenth century. One of the most important secrets in becoming a leader in our MMA program is to overcome every difficulty by perseverance.

 

Confucius said; “one who is impatient in trivial matters can seldom achieve success in matters of great importance.”

 

SELF - CONTROL - This tenet is extremely important inside and outside the training hall, whether conducting oneself in free sparring or in one’s personal affairs. A loss of self-control in free sparring can prove disastrous to both student and/or an opponent. An inability to live and work within one’s capability or sphere is also a lack of self-control. According to Lao-Tzu “the term of stronger is the person who wins over oneself rather than someone else.”

 

INDOMITABLE SPIRIT - “Here lie 300, who did their duty,” a simple epitaph for one of the greatest acts of courage known to mankind. Although facing the superior forces of Xerxes, Leonidas and his 300 Spartans at Thermopylae showed the world the meaning of indomitable spirit. It is shown when a courageous person and his principles are pitted against overwhelming odds.

 

A serious student of MMA will at all times be modest and honest. If confronted with injustice, he will deal with the belligerent without any fear or hesitation at all, with indomitable spirit, regardless of whomsoever, and however, many the number, may be.

 

Confucius declared; “it is an act of cowardice to fail to speak out against injustice.” As history has proven, those who have pursued their dreams earnestly and strenuously with indomitable spirit have never failed to achieve their goals.

 

RESPECT - In the Training Hall, we show respect to the Black Belts, Instructors, Parents, and Guardians by answering, “Yes Sir”, or “Yes Ma’am”.    It is also proper to end all responses with “Sir” or “Ma’am”. We bow to our Instructors before class and after class not for religious purposes but out of respect for their hard work and dedication to the art and the students. Respect is imbued throughout our Student Rules and Etiquette to help teach our students to honor their place of learning, build pride in their school and in their self. Respect is a key ingredient in their learning and we strive to make it a part of their personality inside the school and out.

 

 

The United States Flag

 

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

 

George Washington explained the American Flag thusly: The stars taken from heaven, the red from England and white stripes were added to indicate a separation from a Mother country. Stars have long been used to denote dominion and sovereignty and are ancient symbols of Egypt, India, and Persia.

 

The blue stands for vigilance, perseverance, and justice. The red is hardness and valor and the white means purity and innocence.

 

There are thirteen stripes, red and white, which stand for the original thirteen states that fought and won our freedom and gave birth to our nation. There are fifty white stars lying on a field of blue, each representing the states in our country today.

 

Other Flags

 

At GSW Martial Arts we may represent the origin of other styles of martial arts incorporated into our MMA program out of respect for those countries. Such flags may include but are not limited to: Korean Flag, Japanese Flag, and the Brazilian Flag. The display of these flags is in no way meant to diminish the representation of the Unites States Flag which will hold a higher representation at all times.

 

 Student Pledge – Spoken at the beginning of class.

I will observe the tenets of Martial Arts.

I will respect my instructor and all Student ranks.

I will never misuse Martial Arts.

I will be a champion of freedom and justice.

I will help build a more peaceful world (and use the appropriate finish of “Sir” or “Ma’am”)!

 

Ending Creed

 

As a dedicated student of the Martial Arts, I will live my life by the principals of Black Belt: Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect.

 

Rank Testing

The following are proper procedures for testing day that the student will want to follow:

 

1. You should be on time for your testing. You should be at the training hall early so that you can warm up ahead of time.

2. You should be accountable to the seven tenets. They are the true basis for all rules. Students should memorize the tenets and be able to explain in their own words what each part of he tenets mean.

3. Promotions will be based on class attendance, testing performance, and general attitude in Martial Arts. Physical ability is in second place to mental conditioning and attitude.

4. Know the proper terminology.

5. Students must know the basics of their techniques as well as the meaning of their belt colors.

6. Registration and testing fees should be taken care of the week before testing.

7. No jewelry is to be worn.

8. Proper respect should be given to the higher belt ranks and Black Belt judges and should always be shown.

9. Remember you are being graded from the time you walk in the door until the time you leave. This includes proper warm up, attitude, and respect.

10. Attitude is important. Showing excitement and a good positive attitude will yield positive results.

11. Judges will offer any help or suggestions that they may. However, it is the student’s performance and attitude that is being graded. Proper preparation is vital to a good testing!

12. Any and all Book Reports, Written Tests, or other assignments given by the instructor are to be turned in before the student will be allowed to test.

Meanings of Belt Colors -10 Belt system

Here at GSW Martial Arts Academy, we use a 10 belt color system to signify rank.

White-Innocence or no prior knowledge of Martial Arts

Yellow-Earth-from which a plant sprouts and takes root as the Martial Arts foundation is being laid.

Orange-Sun-as the seed needs the nurturing of the sun to grow, so does the skill that has sprouted.

Green-Growth-the plants growth as the Martial Arts skill begins to develop

Purple-Mountains-The path of the student becomes steep like a mountain path as the tree is in mid growth.

Blue-Heaven-signifies the heaven towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in Martial Arts progresses.

Brown- Roots- The tree is firmly rooted in the earth just as the student now has deep roots in the skill of Martial Arts.

Red- Danger- cautioning the student to exercise control, and warning the opponent to stay away.

Black- the Opposite of white, therefore, signifying the maturity and proficiency in Martial Arts. Also indicates the wearer’s imperviousness to darkness and fear.

  

Type of belt Rank for 10 Belt System used at GSW Martial Arts Academy

 

Black belt -Deputy (or probationary) to Ninth Degree (Dan) –Opposite of White

Black Stripe (on the length of the red belt) 1st Gup a.k.a. Conditional Black Belt (conditions must be met to test for Black Belt)

Red Belt 2nd Gup- Danger

Brown Belt 3rd Gup- Roots

Blue belt 4th Gup–Sky/Heaven

Purple Belt 5th Gup-Mountains

Green belt 6th Gup-Growth

Orange Belt 7th Gup-Sun

Yellow belt 8th Gup-Earth

White belt 10th Gup-Innocence

Meanings of Traditional Belt Colors -6 Belt system (For reference only)

White – Signifies innocence, as that of a beginning student who has no previous knowledge of Martial Arts.

Yellow – Signifies Earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as the Martial Arts foundation is being laid.

Green – Signifies the plant’s growth, as the Martial Arts skill begins to develop.

Blue - Signifies the heaven towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in Martial Arts progresses.

Red - Signifies danger, cautioning the student to exercise control, and warning the opponent to stay away.

Black – Opposite of white, therefore, signifying the maturity and proficiency in Martial Arts. Also indicates the wearer’s imperviousness to darkness and fear.

 

Type of belt Rank for 6 Belt System (For reference only)

 

Black belt -Deputy (or probationary) to Ninth Degree (Dan)

Black Stripe 1st Grade (Gup)

Red Belt 2nd Gup

Red Stripe 3rd Gup

Blue belt 4th Gup

Blue Stripe 5th Gup

Green belt 6th Gup

Green Stripe 7th Gup

Yellow belt 8th Gup

White belt 10th Gup

 

 One Step Sparring (Recommended Self-Defense)

 

One step sparring is designed to help you coordinate your techniques into a block and counter attack pattern. This is actually a simulated fight, as are the forms, but in this case there are two persons involved, attacker and defender. Opponents begin by facing each other in the ready position. The attacker steps backward with the right foot into a fighting stance, and sharply says “kiah”! Upon signal (“kiah”!) from the defender, the attacker then steps forward, with the right foot, into a right front stance while punching with the right hand directed at the defender’s solar plexus. The defender then blocks and counter attacks the attacker’s punch with the correct technique. Both then return to ready positions and resume the pattern, this time changing roles of attacker and defender. No actual physical contact is necessary during the performance of one-step sparring except for the actual blocking of the attacker’s forward punch, and even here only light contact is necessary and that only to keep an over anxious defender from walking into the opponent’s fist! The purpose is to help you determine distance and accuracy. You should start by maintaining enough distance that you are certain not to strike your opponent, then you should gradually work closer as you become more accurate. Timing and speed, used with proper control, are the factors that will show the student’s ability’s as they progress.

 

 Free Sparring

 

Once a student reaches the rank of yellow belt, they begin to learn how to free spar. Free sparring is a controlled exchange of technique between two students. It is less rigid than one step sparring in that the student himself decides what combination of techniques should be used. The emphasis of free sparring is control and distance. Students should exercise control as to the amount of contact made during sparring. Dependant on the rank of student, no contact, light controlled body contact (point-sparring rules with no head contact) and only under the instructor’s supervision will be the enforced rule. We at GSW Martial Arts Academy believe that safety comes first. You must wear complete sparring equipment before sparring. Headgear, mouth guard, rib protection (under 18 yrs old), hand gear, shin pads, and footgear comprise the complete set. Males will also wear groin protection. Any gear purchased outside the training hall must be inspected by an instructor to verify and approve of its effectiveness and use inside the training hall. It is recommended that all gear to be used be purchased through the School to ensure proper quality. Any gear not passing inspection will not be allowed to be used during classes and should remain at home.

 

Components of Power

Speed – Concentration – Equilibrium - Reaction of force –Breath control

  

Some Questions that may be asked during your test!

 

1. What does MMA mean? Mixed Martial Arts.

2. What style of grappling do we use? Freestyle Brazilian and Japanese Ju-Jitsu.

3. What inner defenses do we use? Aikido, Muay-Thai, and Judo.

4. What type of Tae Kwon Do is incorporated into our MMA? Chang Hun.

5. Why was this style created? For Health, Competition, and Fitness.

6. When executing a technique, should you relax or tense your muscles? The muscles should be relaxed.

7. What is a front stance? Feet spread shoulder width apart, two shoulder widths long, 50% weight is on both feet, front knee bent and toes forward, back knee straight. Shoulders and hips squared to front.

8. What is a back stance? Heels in line or slightly apart, 1 ½ shoulder widths or 2 ½ foot lengths apart, 60% weight on rear leg with knee bent, and toes pointed to side. Front knee bent slightly with toes pointed to front.

9. What is a horse riding (middle) stance? Feet two-shoulder widths apart and pointing forward, equal weight distribution, with both knees bent.

10. Why are the feet used more than the hands? Longer reach, stronger muscles, and element of surprise.

11. Why do we “Ki-ah”?  To startle the opponent, get our adrenaline flowing, empty air from our stomach.

12. Why should both ends of the belt hang evenly? To represent equal mental and physical ability, that your left and right sides have equal technique, and for neatness.

13. Should you ever wash your belt? Why or why not? No, you should never wash your belt, it contains all the sweat and dirt (knowledge) of your training, doing so would wash away your knowledge.

14. What are the 2 different ways for holding your foot when executing a round kick? Toes pulled back, using the ball of the foot (as in a front kick), or bent so as to use the instep (top of the foot).

15. When executing a sidekick, should your base leg be bent or straight? Straight.

16. When you are in a front stance executing a technique, do you push off your rear leg or pull with your front leg? You emphasize pulling with your front leg.

17. What do you like best in MMA?

18. What has MMA given you?

What IS a black belt?

 

There is, of course, the obvious answer. It’s black, about two inches wide, and in good or poor condition, depending on how long it’s been worn. In our School we affirm that being a black belt is in the course of serving others, being humble, and above all caring. Physical skill is only a small portion of being a Black Belt. The majority of being a Black Belt is having the correct mental attitude, which involves highly the things previously stated. It is NOT however about “kicking butt and taking names”.

 

There are, however, other topics NOT worth discussing during class. For example, who is better, a boxer or a karate fighter? You’ve probably heard that more than a few times.

 

Could Chuck Norris beat Bruce Lee?

 

What talents do black belts actually possess and what talents are fictional?

 

BLACK BELT SHOULD’S

 

* A black belt should possess undying courage.

* A black belt should have great strength, because he or she has learned a way to generate power. In fact, there should be more power now, than before training was started.

* A black belt should have kindness in his heart for the underdog, the elderly, the sick, and should be willing to use the art to defend these people without fear for oneself.

* A black belt should always be humble, because, through knowledge, he or she should realize how much there is to learn and how much they don’t know.

* A black belt should realize that there is always more to accomplish in this art.

* A black belt should know that he or she must earn respect from students and others in the martial arts community, that it can’t be demanded.

* A black belt should seek an overall perspective of the martial arts.

* A black belt should know that, except in extremely rare instances, the martial arts aren’t a platform for stardom. Rather, the art is a platform for character perfection.

  

BLACK BELT SHOULD NOT’S

 

* A black belt should not be the tough guy on the block who wants to show off.

* A black belt should not think he or she is invincible – no matter how good you are, there is someone better!

* A black belt should not believe he could beat anyone he wants, just because they’re trained to be a black belt.

* A black belt should not believe he would stay in shape for the rest of his life, without continually working at it.

* A black belt should not criticize other styles or other’s traditions. There is no one right way in the martial arts.

* A black belt should not be uncaring about others. He should not forget empathy, sensitivity and understanding.

* A black belt should not feel that others owe him something because he is a black belt.

 

 The History of Advancement

The ancient law in the Orient was similar to the law of Hammurabi, “an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth”, and rigorously enforced even if death was caused accidentally. (It cannot be unsaid about the three books in The Bible where the laws of that day are stated. (Exodus 21:23, Leviticus 24:19, and Deuteronomy 19:21.) Living in this type of environment, and since the present system of free sparring had not yet been developed, it was impossible for a student of the martial arts to practice or test his individual skill of attack and defense against actual moving opponents.

 

Individual advancement was certainly hindered until an imaginative practitioner created the first forms.

 

Forms are various fundamental movements, most of which represent either attack or defense techniques, set to a fixed and logical sequence.

 

The student systematically deals with several imaginary opponents under various assumptions using every available attacking and blocking tool from different directions. Thus forms practice enables the student to go through many fundamental movements in series, to develop sparring techniques, improve flexibility of movements, master body shifting, build muscles and breath control, develop fluid and smooth motions, and gain rhythmical movements.

 

It also enables a student to acquire certain special techniques, which cannot be obtained from either fundamental exercises, or sparring. In short, a pattern can be compared with a unit tactic or a word, if fundamental movement is an individual soldier’s training or alphabet. Accordingly, in the pattern, the ledger of every movement is a series of sparring, power, feats, and holds a characteristic beauty.

 

Though sparring may merely indicate that an opponent is more or less advanced, forms are a more critical barometer in evaluating an individual’s technique.

 

Most martial arts styles use forms as their basic method of training. The types of form taught vary from style to style. Chinese forms, for example, emphasize circular movements. Korean and Japanese forms are more angular and linear in movement.

 

Forms are not exercises in the calisthenics sense. These forms may be more accurately described as choreographed movements. Depending upon the style of martial arts, the student may be required to learn from one to as many as 30 or more forms. However, in our MMA program advancement is based on individual progression in techniques and evaluation on an individual physical basis rather than by forms.

 

The first martial artists learned their art on an intellectual level. They devoted themselves to meditative and intellectual pursuits before learning physical discipline. But this was merely a matter of practicality as well as culture.

 

In the western world most martial arts students learn the martial arts first on the physical level. Another way to describe this learning process is to say that the student learns the martial arts from the outside in, but this is in no way inferior to its oriental counterparts.

 

The students begin by first becoming aware of their bodies. Martial arts teach us to develop and discipline our bodies and make them able to respond to our commands.

 

The beginning student may believe he or she will not have much difficulty learning techniques, at least superficially. At first, the student probably will have difficulty believing how something that appears so simple can be so profound. It has been said that learning techniques is like learning the letters of the alphabet. Eventually, you will be using these letters to read and to write. As time passes, the student will be learning the lessons of the techniques in every aspect of his or her life. This will become clear as you practice the techniques over and over again, mastering them on several different levels.

 

In the beginning, we learn to execute the shortest, least complicated techniques, and we learn to perform them slowly.

 

The emphasis is on precision. What you are attempting to do is to educate your body through forms, teaching it is to educate your body through forms, teaching it to do exactly what you tell it. Later we learn the more complex techniques. We continue to practice increasing our speed without losing our precision. There is an old saying in performing techniques. “Slow is Smooth, Smooth is Fast.” This might not makes sense to you when you first begin but will become apparent as you progress. We also learn to vary the intensity with which we perform the techniques. As beginners, we practice these techniques alone, without a partner. But as we become somewhat accomplished, we can then advance to sparring with a partner and engage in actual light physical contact.

 

From those first moments we begin learning techniques, we are putting into practice with our physical being the principles of the martial arts. And as time passes, the techniques we have learned take on new meaning, as do the principles behind them As we acquire discipline and begin to work with a partner, we immediately start to learn the true meaning of adaptability. You quickly learn how to relate your own movements to those of another individual. You begin to comprehend the nature of change, redirection of force, the feeling of dynamic balance, and the difference between hard and soft. By enacting various situations of confrontation through the techniques, we begin to comprehend the nature of conflict, and we begin to learn how and when we can avoid it and what to do when we cannot.

 

As you master the techniques they will become smooth and automatic, and you can see how you are expressing the basic martial arts principles and philosophy spontaneously through your body movements. You will notice that your mind and body will function as one. You begin to feel more “together”. The initial body awareness you acquire through the techniques will soon begin to generalize throughout your entire being.

 

A student demonstration of a technique – how precisely, definitively, and how completely he or she can do it - becomes an objective measurement of his ability. The student soon learns how well he or she is doing and so does his instructor. It is as if they are trying to mast a ballet step or a piano sonata. Technical perfection must come first. After technical perfection, however, there is another step – using the techniques in combination with another student or possibly at the highest levels, interpreting them for oneself.

 

Through the techniques, martial arts students develop physical and mental discipline. They, in effect, become more physically and mentally fit. They develop balance, control, coordination, speed and agility. The student also develops strength and endurance, and learns about their own physical self. The student comes to understand the nature of motion and change. He or she also learns how to concentrate and empty their mind of conscious thought so that the body can move more spontaneously. Through the techniques the martial arts student moves toward a greater unity of mind and body. They then are able to direct this energy towards other goals in life, whatever they may be.

 

As the martial arts student masters the techniques he or she will come to realize that this learning process has touched them not only physically but also intellectually. Techniques make use of your internal muscles as well as your external ones. This process not only gets the outside of your body into shape. It also exercises the muscles inside your abdomen and back, which support your internal organs.

 

Proper breathing is critical in the martial arts. You cannot do a technique properly if you do not breathe properly. It is as much a part of the technique as how you move your arms and legs. If you are only going through the external motions, you will not receive all of the benefits that the martial arts have to offer.

 

Through the techniques we learn to increase or decrease our respiration rate, and control the amount of air we inhale and the manner in which we exhale. These breathing patterns create pressure against our internal organs and cause our musculature to move or to be exercised.

 

There is no other activity, which develops your body more completely than the martial arts. This is because techniques make you move your body in every possible direction it can go. This means that you must move or exercise every single muscle group in each and every part of your body, inside and out.

 

The techniques teach you to summon and direct your energy toward mental as well as physical tasks. You will be better able to clear your mind of extraneous thoughts, to concentrate, and you will also be better able to react more quickly to situations.

 

The goal of most Western physical activities is simple: to perfect the execution of that activity. But the purpose of the martial arts is very different. Initially you must acquire the necessary skill, and must perfect the activity – in effect, master the techniques. But that is only the beginning. Look for the true meaning of the techniques and you will see what is meant. They have a twofold goal. First, is to teach you (through body movements) a practical philosophy of life, and second, is to unify your body and your mind thereby incorporating the principles of that philosophy into your total being. More than any other physical activity the martial arts significantly affect your mental processes and influence the way you live your life. Who does not know any person who has truly committed himself or herself to the martial arts who has not experienced deep, lasting mental change!

 

MMA Techniques have been developed and perfected throughout the centuries by the outstanding teachers of many different arts. Each technique consists of the most logical movements of blocking, punching, striking or kicking possible within a sequence of movements. A student should not attempt to take on a new technique until he or she has perfected the techniques he or she is required to learn at their new level of achievement. Before advancing to another set of techniques it is customary for a student to perform the ones he or she is presently learning at least 300 times.

 

Our GSW Martial Arts Academy “system” has a step in between red belt black stripe and 1st degree. We call this the “deputy” or probationary black belt. This fits well as we do not have a 9th Gup.

 

School Library

At GSW Martial Arts Academy, we firmly believe that exercising the mind is just as important as exercising the body. Because of this we have a Library of reference and information books. The topics of these books relate to aspects from all over the Martial Arts. These books can be checked out and used by the students for a proscribed period of time. The student that checked out the material will be responsible for replacing the material if the books are returned damaged or not returned at all. If, the book is not returned on time, the student will not be allowed to check any more books out until the late book is returned. Other students will need to benefit from the material so please be courteous.

 

Affiliation- Worldwide Martial Arts Federation

At GSW Martial Arts, we take great pride in our affiliation with Worldwide Martial Arts Federation (WMAF). We strive to uphold their traditions and standards. It is through WMAF that we are able to bring this curriculum to our students.

 

*Disclaimer* We at GSW Martial Arts Academy strongly recommend that prospective students consult a physician BEFORE beginning any physical strenuous regiment. We ask that any limitations, ailments, or illnesses be disclosed before attending any regular class so that our instructors can accommodate special needs. It is also the student’s responsibility to ensure they properly warm up due to limited class time and space.

 

GSW MARTIAL ARTS

MMA

BELT REQUIREMENTS

 

 

 GSW Martial Arts Academy

How to properly tie your belt.

When finished, Knott should face left. All rank stripes should be on your left. Any and all Black stripe awards should be on your left and any color stripes should be on your right. Belt should look like one single belt all the way around the waist with no crisscross in the back.

 

WHITE BELT

Knowledge Base Cheat Sheet for GSW Martial Arts Academy

 

Class Pledge:

1)       I will observe the tenets of Tae Kwon Do.

2)       I will respect my instructor and all student ranks.

3)       I will never misuse Tae Kwon Do.

4)       I will be a champion for Freedom and Justice.

5)       I will help to build a more peaceful world.

*end in “Sir” or “Ma’am” depending on the gender of the lead instructor.*

 

Ending Creed:

As a dedicated student of the martial arts, I will live my life by the Principals of Black Belt: Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect.

 

What does MMA mean? Mixed Martial Arts

What is a TAPOUT? A submittal to avoid injury

What are we learning MMA? Self-Defense and Fitness

What Style of Tae Kwon Do is incorporated in our MMA Program?  Chang Hun

What are the Tenets of Martial Arts? Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect

What does the color of your white belt mean? Innocence or no prior knowledge of MMA.

Is it ok to wash your belt? NO. Why? Because it symbolically washes away the experience we gain and we would have to start over.

 

One Steps:

1)       Step out to the left into a horse stance facing opponent and execute a left hand push block above the elbow at the same time. Low punch right hand to the ribs. Low Punch left hand to the ribs. High punch right hand to the temple.

2)       Step out to the left at a 45 degree angle into a front stance and grab punch with right hand at the same time. Step up to closed stance with right foot and execute a right sidekick to the ribs while holding the punch. Step down with the right foot and step around inside with the left foot while continuing to hold the punch hand. Reach over the top of the held arm with the left hand bringing their arm in close and bending their elbow sliding your left hand under your armpit. Pull their right wrist over the top of their elbow while still maintaining your grip on the wrist and pull their wrist down and toward you into a gooseneck.

3)       Step straight forward into a right foot forward front stance. Left hand knife-hand block the punch while executing a right elbow strike to the jaw just below the ear at the same time. Grab the punch hand with the left hand. Take your right arm and wrap over the top of their punch arm and lock your right hand onto the top of your left wrist while continuing to hold their punch wrist. Swing right leg back out around behind you brining your opponent face down to the ground in a Kamura and step over them with your left foot while maintaining your grip on their punch arm.


WHITE BELT-
10th Gup

 

White Belt Color Meaning: Signifies innocence, as that of a beginning student who has no previous knowledge of Martial Arts.

 

TAPOUT: tapping on opponent or on the mat, or verbally saying “TAPOUT” to signify that you have had enough or that you submit to avoid injury. This means that the opponent is to show proper control and release immediately to prevent harm or serious bodily injury!

Cardio Conditioning

1. M30’s

2. 3 minutes continuous running

Bag Work

1. 2 One minute rounds punching bag

2. 2 One minute rounds kicking bag

 

Target Drills

1. Jab, Punch (tic, tac)

2. Front kick (toe)

 

Hand Technique

1. Down block front stance.

2. Rising block front stance.

3. Outer forearm block front stance.

4. Solar plexus punch front stance.

5. Inner forearm block back stance.

 

Foot Technique

1. Front kick.

2. Roundhouse kick.

3. Side kick.

4. Stepping Side kick.

 

Ground Techniques

1. Positions: Mount, Guard, Side Control

2. 2 Sweeps out of guard: scissor kick and push

3. Break fall techniques

 

Defense

1. against the wrist grab

2. against the choke hold

3. Headlock Defense

 

Take Downs

1. Judo Hip Throw

2. Arm Lock with clavicle forearm strike and cross body leg sweep.

 

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Step Forward R leg front stance, R Elbow, Arm Bar R Arm, transition to Kimura in standing position.

 

2. Step out w/L leg, R leg side kick, slide into joint lock (come-along) with R Arm in standing position.

 

3. Step out w/L leg, L hand push block, double punch ribs, R punch face, horse riding stance.

 

Breaking Technique – Stepping side kick.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Rising kick

2. Crescent kicks (inside & outside)

3. Stepping side kick.

4. Flying side kick.

 

YELLOW BELT – 8th Gup

 

Yellow Belt Color Meaning: Signifies Earth, from which a plant sprouts and takes root as you MMA foundation is being laid.

 

Cardio Conditioning

1. M40’s

2. 4 minutes continuous running

 

Bag Work

1. 2 One minute rounds elbow and knee bag

2. 2 One minute rounds punch and kick bag

 

Target Drills

1. Palm Strike

2. Round kick

 

Hand Technique

1. Down block, reverse punch.

2. Rising block, reverse punch.

3. Knife hand guarding block back stance.

4. Twin forearm guarding block back stance.

5. Knife hand strike (back stance).

 

Foot Technique

1. Jab, reverse punch, back leg roundhouse kick.

2. Step into side kick.

3. Back leg roundhouse kick, spin side kick.

Ground Techniques

1. Swim and post in mount

2. Waist deflect in mount

 

Defense

1.  T-Rex arms

2. Standing Arm Swim Technique

Take Downs

1. Diagonal Take Down with Slam

2. Elbow under Chin with Leg Sweep (modified wrestler shoot)

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Standing Triangle Choke with Take Down Variation: Slide head under punch with left leg forward, R arm wrap around neck, R hand to left bicep, L arm to 90 degrees (answer phone), finish Triangle choke in standing position. Show same choke with take down variation.  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes19.htm

 

2. Arm Bar from Mount: http://www.submissions101.com/armlocks12.htm

 

3. Step out w/L leg (behind punch), L hand push block, reverse punch, R leg round kick to midsection.

 

4. Arm bar from guard underneath.

 

5. Arm bar from side control

 

6. Clavicle Leg Sweep from white belt into Standing Arm Bar.

 

Breaking Technique – Spinning sidekick.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Spinning sidekick.

2. Jumping front kick.

3. Front kick step down other leg round kick reverse punch

4. Jab punch round kick

5. Back-Fist step in side kick

 

 ORANGE BELT -7th Gup

 

Orange Belt Color Meaning-Sun-as the seed needs the nurturing of the sun to grow, so does the skill that has sprouted in you.

 

Cardio Conditioning

1. M50’s

2. 5 minutes continuous running

Bag Work

1. 2 Two minute rounds Punching the bag

2. 2 Two minute rounds Kicking the bag

3. 2 Two minute rounds Knee and Elbow bag

 

Target Drills

1. Hook Punch

2. Step in Sidekick

Hand Technique

1. Down block, reverse punch.

2. Rising block, reverse punch.

3. Outer forearm block, reverse punch.

4. Spear finger.

5. Knife hand strike (back stance).

 

Foot Technique

1. Back leg double round kick.

2. Step into hook kick, reverse punch.

3. Back leg roundhouse kick, spin sidekick, and reverse punch.

 

Ground Techniques:

1. Combine Yellow Belt Ground Techniques

2. Key Lock from mount both sides

 

Defense

1. Dual Breakout with Front Kick

2. Sprawl

Take Downs

1. Guillotine throw

2. Guillotine roll into reverse guillotine

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Kimura from Guard: Duck under punch, shoot to takedown (45 deg) with both arms on ground in full guard, person with back on ground kips and performs Kimura on both arms.

 

2. Standing Guillotine: Step out L leg, L arm outer block, R hand behind neck, R knee strike, finish to standing Guillotine Choke

 

3. Inside out crescent kick, other leg double round kick.

 

4. Ring attack posture. Turn, jab, punch, kick, takedown.

 

5. Ground Arm Triangle. (top and bottom)

 

Breaking Technique – Any hand or elbow technique.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Double roundhouse kick.

2. Stepping hook kick.

3. Step jump front kick.

 

 GREEN BELT – 6th Gup

 

Green Belt Color Meaning: signifies the plant’s growth as the MMA skills begin to develop in you.

 

Cardio Conditioning

1. M60’s

2. 6 minutes of continuous running.

 

Bag Work

1. 2 Three minute rounds Punching Bag

2. 2 Three minute rounds Kicking Bag

3. 2 Three minute rounds Knee and Elbow Bag

 

Target Drills

1. Upper cut

2. Spin Hook Kick

 

Hand Technique

1. Down block, double punch.

2. Rising block, double punch.

3. Knife hand guarding block back stance, switch to front stance, reverse punch.

4. Twin fore arm block, reverse knife hand slap chest, punch in back stance.

5. Outer forearm block, down block, reverse punch (front stance).

 

Foot Technique

1. Double front kick, reverse punch.

2. Switch feet back leg round kick, spin hook kick all the way around, reverse punch.

3. Switch feet back leg front kick, spin crescent kick all the way around, reverse punch.

 

Ground Techniques

1. Combine Orange Belt techniques

2. Pass the guard into side Control

 

Defense

1. Hug from front arms free. Clap ears, or knuckles push below ear lobes, finger to throat.

2. Hug from front arms not free. Relax bend knees bring both arms up making knife hands then strike there rib cage.

Take Downs

1. Thai Clinch Throw

2. Shoulder Throw with neck clinch

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Rear-naked Choke (fist to fist):  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes5.htm

 

2. Anaconda Choke:  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes4.htm

 

3. Outside in crescent kick, other leg spin hook kick all the way around.

 

4. Standing Rear naked choke with takedown and leg lock.

 

5. Standing Anaconda Choke with roll takedown.

 

Breaking Technique Spin hook or heel kick.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Spin crescent kick

2. Spin hook kick

3. Spin heel kick.

 

PURPLE BELT - 5th Gup

 

Purple Belt Color Meaning-Majestic Mountains-The path of the student becomes steep like a mountain path as the tree is in mid growth.

 

Cardio Conditioning

1. M70’s

2. 7 minutes of continuous running.

 

Bag Work

1. 3 Two minute rounds Punching bag.

2. 3 Two minute rounds Kicking bag

3. 3 Two minute rounds Knee and Elbow bag

 

Target Drills

1. Jab, Hook, Uppercut punch

2. Spin Crescent kick

 

Hand Technique

1. Down block rising block back stance, switch to front stance reverse punch.

2. Open hand circle down, reverse ridge hand (front stance).

3. Searching block twice-punch (front stance).

4. Knife hand guarding block, outer forearm block back stance, switch to front stance reverse punch.

5. Knife hand strike horse riding stance, square punch, front punch (alternate hands).

 

Foot Technique

1. Rear leg front kick waist, round kick head, reverse punch.

2. Step in hook kick round kick, reverse punch.

3. Switch feet axe kick, jump spin side kick, reverse punch.

 

Ground Techniques

1. Combine Green belt Techniques

2. Straight arm bar from side control

 

Defense

1. Hug from front arms free. Thrust finger to throat or knife strike at an angle to shoulder.

2. Grab from behind arms free. Elbow strike to head then elbow strike other elbow to head.

 

Take Downs

1. Wrestlers Shoot

2. Scissor kick from ground into a roll

 

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Knee Bar from Guard:  http://www.submissions101.com/leglocks10.htm

 

2. Knuckle Choke from Mount: http://www.submissions101.com/chokes38.htm

 

3. Grab wrist w/L hand, step in w/L foot lift arm up and knuckle uppercut to ribs,

sweep leg w/L foot R leg axe kick to solar plexus.

 

4. Thai Clinch. Bring right knee up into solar plexus. Kick right leg up over opponent’s head and shoulder into a Scissor Leg Lock. Lock ankles and roll backward. Grab opponent’s right arm in mid roll and finish with arm bar or Kamura.

 

5. Von Flue Choke

 

Breaking Technique – Step in hook kick (one hand hold for “extra credit”).

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Front kick, round kick (same leg).

2. Switch feet axe kick.

3. Step in hook kick, round kick.

4. Jump spin sidekick.

 

BLUE BELT - 4th Gup

 

Blue Belt Color Meaning: Signifies the Heaven towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in MMA progresses.

 

Cardio Conditioning

1. M80’s

2. 8 Minutes of continuous running.

 

Bag Work

1. 3 Three minute rounds Punching bag

2. 3 Three minute rounds Kicking bag

3. 3 Three minute rounds Knee and Elbow bag

 

Target Drills

1. Rising block, jab, hook punch, round kick.

2. Double round kick.

 

Hand Technique

1. Down block, palm heel, punch low, punch high (alternate hands w/ea. technique) all done in front stance.

2. Down block back stance, switch to front stance reverse knife hand, punch low, punch high.

3. Reverse ridge hand back stance, front leg front kick, then step forward with circular upper pressing block in cat stance.

4. Lower cross block, twin vertical punch, rear elbow strike (front stance).

5. Rear leg side kick, knife hand strike horse riding stance, square punch, then front punch.

 

Foot Technique

1. Step into jump round kick.

2. Step into jump inside out crescent kick.

3. Back leg double round kick, spin sidekick, jump spin crescent kick (alternate legs each kick).

Ground Techniques

1. Combine Purple Belt techniques

2. Kip hook leg and roll from guard underneath to break mount.

Defense

1. Grab from behind arms not free. Stomp foot and back head strike.

2. Grab from behind fingers locked together. Grab finger and pull back.

 

Take Downs

1. Modified Key Lock with Leg sweep

2. Thai clinch push forward with Leg sweep

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Americana Key Lock:  http://www.submissions101.com/armlocks19.htm

 

2. Three Points of Death Triangle Drill:  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes36.htm

 

3. L hand push block, L foot double round kick, other leg jump spin crescent kick

 

4. Modified Key Lock with elbow choke from mount.

 

5. Modified Americana Key Lock with neck tweak. (arm behind head)

 

Breaking Technique -Jump into round kick.

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Jump spin crescent kick.

2. Step into jump round kick.

3. Step into jump inside out crescent kick.

 

BROWN BELT

3rd Gup

Brown Belt Color Meaning: Roots- The tree is firmly rooted in the earth just as the student now has deep roots in the skills of MMA.

 

Cardio Conditioning

1. M90’s

2. 9 minutes of continuous running

 

Bag Work

1. 3 Four minute rounds Punching bag

2. 3 Four minute rounds Kicking bag

3. 3 Four minute rounds Knee and Elbow bag.

 

Target Drills

1. Back fist knife strike

2. Back fist, spinning Back fist

3. Front kick, Round kick

 

Hand Technique

1. Double augmented block back stance, switch to front stance front hand inner forearm block, other arm down block.

2. Down block back stance, switch to front stance reverse arm down block, switch to back stance reverse arm outer block, then knife hand strike with front hand.

3. Low knife hand guarding block back stance, switch to front stance circle block.

4. Down block low front stance, twin vertical punch, back leg front kick, reverse punch, front punch.

5. Double punch front stance, spin knife hand strike back stance.

 

Foot Technique

1. Step into side kick round kick, reverse punch.

2. Round kick high side kick low, reverse punch.

3. Tornado kick, spin hook kick all the way around, reverse punch.

 

Ground Techniques

1. Pound, Pound, elbow, elbow

2. Defender push back bring both legs up and wrap around and smash attackers head on the ground.

Defense

1. Full nelson from back. Defender step behind open arms and twist the direction whatever foot you stepped behind with.

2. One arm choke from behind. Defender elbow strike grab arm and flip over shoulder.

Take Downs

1. Down on left knee, hands on floor, turning back, right foot leg sweep to heel.

2. Left hand push block. Right hand ridge hand across chest with right foot leg sweep.

 

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Heel Hook from Guard:  http://www.submissions101.com/leglocks5.htm

 

2. Crucifix from Side Control:  http://www.submissions101.com/chokes10.htm

 

3. Step back push block, tornado kick, spin hook kick.

 

4. Double arm bar from side control

 

Breaking Technique - Jump spin sidekick. (2 boards)

 

Kicks to Learn

1. Step into round kick.

2. Tornado kick.

3. Round kick sidekick.

4. Side kick round kick.

 
RED BELT - 2nd Gup

 

Red Belt Color Meaning- Danger- cautioning the student to exercise control, and warning the opponent to stay away.

 

Cardio Conditioning

1. M100’s

2. 10 minutes of continuous running.

 

Bag Work

1. 3 Five minute rounds Punching bag

2. 3 Five minute rounds Kicking bag

3. 3 Five minute rounds Knee and Elbow bag

 

Target Drills

1. Punch, Palm strike same hand

2. Spin side kick, round kick

 

Hand Technique

1. Jab in a fighting stance, move forward circling knife hand strike down in a back stance.

2. From fighting stance, move forward jab, front hook, reverse uppercut, reverse hook punch.

3. Double palm heel strikes to the face, double knife hand strikes to the sides looking to the front side then reverse arm side, then looking forward twin reverse knife hand strikes to the neck.

4. Jump spin knife hand strike, reverse punch (twist hips into punch).

 

Foot Technique

1. Spin round kick, put the leg down forward, front leg round kick high, round kick mid, then reverse punch.

2. Spin side kick low, round kick high, put leg down forward, reverse uppercut, front hand hook punch.

3. Switch feet rear leg hook kick, put leg down forward, jump spin hook kick all the way around, reverse cross elbow.

4. Switch feet front kick using the power of the hips, spin hook kick round kick, put the leg down forward, front hand open to the face, reverse punch same time (blast forward).

 

Ground Techniques

1. Darce Choke

2. Dome Choke

 

Defense

1. Arm bar defense

2. Leg Triangle defense.

Take Downs

1. Kick grab with Leg sweep

2. Darce choke with a sitting roll into mount.

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Gogoplata (Shin Choke) from the Guard: http://www.submissions101.com/chokes7.htm

 

2. The Toe Hold from the Guard:  http://www.submissions101.com/leglocks6.htm

 

3. Outside in crescent kick, spin hook kick round kick.

 

4. Blackout

 

Breaking Technique: Any two techniques combining minimum of 3 boards or one technique with 4 boards.

 

Kicks to Learn:

1. Spin double sidekick.

2. Spin side kick round kick.

3. Spin hook kick round kick.

4. Spin round kick

5. Tornado round kick.

6. Jump spin hook kick.

 

RED BELT / BLACK STRIPE (Conditional) - 1st Gup

 

Black Stripe Meaning- All conditions must be met during this rank in order to be eligible for Black Belt Testing.

 

Cardio Conditioning

1. M100’s

2. Reverse M50’s

3. 15 minutes of continuous running.

 

Bag Work

1. 5 Five minute rounds Punching bag

2. 5 Five minute rounds Kicking bag

3. 5 Five minute rounds Knee and Elbow bag

 

Target Drills

1. Outer block, spin hook Kick

2. Step in Hook Kick, round kick

 

Hand Technique

1. Reverse arm push down block front stance, step up behind front foot with rear leg to ball of foot, reverse punch across body, then step forward with front foot, hook punch reverse punch.

2. Double down block, double inner forearm block, reverse arm palm heel strike to face (front stance), reverse punch midsection, then front punch to face.

3. Front hand reverse knife hand strike to collar bone, pull back eye attack, jump spin hook kick, drop spin leg sweep, reverse punch.

4. Front stance reverse ridge hand with front hand, reverse hand knife hand down block, then switch hands, drop spin side kick, reverse punch, then up to fighting stance.

 

Foot Technique

1. 360° sidekick.

2. Front leg jump hook, front leg side kick round kick hook kick, blasting forward reverse punch.

3. Tornado round kick, front hand jab and hook punch, reverse uppercut and hook punch.

4. Jump spin round kick, dropping the kicking leg forward spin hook kick round kick head level, side kick belt level.

 

Ground Techniques

1. One arm choke with opponents own arm.

2. Omoplata

 

Defense

1. Chicken wing defense

2. Two hand choke defense to a dual standing arm bar.

 

Take Downs

1. Grab arm, with left hand, step to side right hand underneath up behind neck and force down to roll opponent.

2. Grab one hand with both hands twisting arm to make opponent face away. Kick to back of the knee dropping opponent to the ground.

 

Self-Defense Techniques

1. Hip Push Sweep from Stacking Open Guard:  http://www.submissions101.com/sweeps50.htm

 

2. Full Nelson Escape into Arm Bar:  http://www.submissions101.com/selfdefense15.htm

 

3. Step back low knife hand guarding block, 360° side kick.

 

4. Sitting Shoulder Bar

 

Breaking Technique

1. Jump spin hook kick (1 board, single hand hold).

2. 360° side kick (2 boards).

3. Palm heel strike (brick or boards as determined by instructors)

 

Kicks to Learn

1. 360°-side kick.

2. Jump spin round kick.

3. Spin hook kick, round kick, sidekick

 

BLACK BELT REPORT AND SPARRING

 

The MMA report will consist of 5-8 pages. Single sided, double-spaced. The subject should be something about their “journey through the Martial Arts” and should have some research ideas and a bit of History of their “Art” included. What they thought of before they started, why they started. Was it different than your expectations? What was happening during the transformation of a beginner student, to intermediate, to a black belt? What does black belt mean to you? What did MMA do for you? What do you see happening with you and MMA in the future? The report needs a title page, bibliography, and a plastic sheet protector binder. The rough draft needs to be handed in a minimum of one month before student intends to test, so the instructor can proof read it, approve it, and give it back for corrections if needed. The final Copy will be kept by the Academy for record. Any student testing for any level of black belt needs to give their intentions of testing to their instructor a minimum of 2 months before their projected test date.

 

A black belt should have the best control of any student. SELF CONTROL IS OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE! Our GSW Martial Arts Academy rule will be minimal to no head contact whatsoever with any student that is a blue belt or lower in rank even if the student has head gear on. Self-control is always needed and especially when the sparring partner is of lesser ability. The discipline of oneself to perform pushups immediately after accidental contact after an apology and insurance of the other being all right will be our necessary action if we are a sparring student. Someone that likes to “hit”, will also be able to “take a hit”.

 

Always remember to take pride in self-control, that it takes extremely more skill to come close to the target with a quick technique, than actually hitting that target.

DEPUTY BLACK BELT OR PROBATIONARY BLACK BELT

 

NOTE: This belt can be taken away from the student by the promotion board if determined necessary.

 

Self-Defense Techniques

MMA students may be asked to make up their own one-steps or MMA techniques. Two that are submission, two take downs, and two free style. It is recommended that the student study the other self-defense techniques from all belt levels.

 

Kicks

360 Crescent kick

360 Hook kick

Flying double side kick

Jumping front kick

Breaking

Flying double side kick on heavy bag

Jumping front kick

One Brick

Other breaks as determined by examining board.

 

Other Requirements

Minimum six months training time and teaching is required to reach 1st degree.

 

Black belts should be teaching beginner students.

 

Reading of the book, “A Book of Five Rings”.

 

Black Belt Curriculum

The purpose of this document is to define the black belt curriculum of GSW Martial Arts Academy. Like all ranks, black belts are expected to know all of the material for all lower ranks. The reason that the black belt curriculum is considered separately is because of the flexible nature of advanced training. Before getting into details, several assumptions must be explained.

 

1) Black belts must be both students and teachers. Just as it is unacceptable for a black belt never to teach class, it is unacceptable for a black belt never to take class. The classes that black belts take may not be the same classes that lower ranks take, and they may not take them as the same frequency, but black belts are expected to take class regularly.

 

2) What is “required” of one student will be required of all students. There will be no exceptions. Having universal requirements precludes there being higher value placed on one student’s rank compared to another’s. This is not to say that some students won’t be pushed harder in some areas than others, and other students pushed differently. This will be according to the student’s aptitude and interest.

 

Promotions for black belts are more a function of experience (e.g. “time at rank”) and maturity than merely meeting the written requirements. For example, even if the requirement for a student’s next rank is to learn three forms and teach 50 classes (for example), this doesn’t mean that the student can reach the requirement in a month by learning the forms quickly and teaching several classes per day for several weeks.

 

In general, the amount of time it takes from one black belt rank to the next is the next degree, in years. For example, two years from first to second, three years from second to third, and so on. There are exceptions, of course, but this rule of thumb will be followed in all but extreme circumstances.

 

Self-Defense

Black belts are expected to be competent at as many of the techniques that make up the school’s self-defense body of knowledge (SD BoK) as practical. Clearly, as new techniques are introduced to the SD BOK, it will take time for them to proliferate around to all students. However, the main expectation of black belts is to demonstrate in-depth knowledge and extreme proficiency at a sub-set of the SD BoK. The higher the rank, the larger the sub-set required.

 

Sparring

Sparring is, first and foremost, an exercise in control and black belts are expected to have

Exemplary control. Students should understand that control is the ability to strike only as hard as intended regardless of what their partner does. “He walked into it” does excuse having hit someone too hard! Safety is always first. Please refer to the student handbook for sparring equipment requirements.

 

Teaching

Black belts are expected to pass along what they learn by teaching lower belts. This does not necessarily mean leading class as the “head instructor.” Helping the head instructor by working with a sub-set of the class is fine. It is understood that there is a finite number of classes and we do not want to define a requirement that is untenable. The goal is for the black belt to have experience working with lower belts to ensure that he/she stays connected with the school and its primary constituents: the students. This will also ensure that the black belt stays current with any changes to the lower belt curriculum, though these changes won’t occur very often.

 

Research Paper

All students testing for first degree black belt are expected to write a paper on their own journey in the martial arts. For ranks beyond first degree, students are expected to do research into other areas. Suffice it to say that the paper must be more than a book report or a personal story and should help the reader not only to better understand another area of the martial arts, but also to better understand the author. The length required and whether a topic is acceptable are up to the school’s senior black belts and should be discussed with them in advance.

 

Beyond MMA

GSW Martial Arts Academy is, at the end of the day, a martial arts school. Our curriculum may be based on Fitness and Self-Defense, but our training is not exclusive to it.  Black belts are expected to seek out knowledge in other arts and use that knowledge to enhance the school. This may be as simple as taking a one-day seminar and adding to the SD BoK, or as complex as earning rank in another style then comparing and contrasting its philosophy with that of MMA.

 

The Research Writing and Beyond MMA requirements may be combined. For example, the students takes a seminar in Capoeira, writes about a paper that combines the history of that art with the student’s experience, and adapts a Capoeira technique that contributes to the SD BoK.

 

Interview

A face-to-face interview with senior black belts will be part of the black belt promotion process. This interview will cover a discussion of the candidate’s training, teaching philosophy, research paper, and future goals. It may include actual demonstrations of forms and techniques, but will NOT be in front of an audience. The goal is for the senior black belts to fully evaluate the candidate’s readiness for promotion, not be a spectacle for others to witness.

 Curriculum

The purpose of this document is to define the regular curriculum of GSW Martial Arts Academy. The curriculum can be divided into three general categories: Techniques, self-defense, and sparring. The remainder of this document will describe each of those categories and define the curriculum requirements at each rank. Assume that what is given at each rank is required to test for next higher rank, along with the curriculum for all previous ranks.

 

In addition to learning the curriculum, students are also expected to attend class regularly and gain a certain level of experience at each rank prior to testing for their next rank. For higher ranks, this may also include teaching experience. Specific requirements in these regards will not be stated, but suffice it to say that proper knowledge of the curriculum below is a necessary, but not a sufficient, requirement for testing. Of course, a proper attitude is also required for any promotion, so students are reminded to adhere to the tenets of Martial Arts as stated in the student handbook.

 

Learning technique is done in stages. The first stage is to be able to follow along in class and properly execute each technique, with the instructor describing each movement. The second stage is to be able to do the same without the instructor describing each movement, but still correcting the movements. The third is to be able to do the same without the instructor correcting. The fourth stage is to be able to confidently execute each technique with appropriate timing on one’s own, that is, without anyone else assisting and without any input from the instructor. It is this fourth stage that is required to successfully test for the next rank.

 

Each student will have his or her own way of doing each form. There are some absolutes with regard to correctness, but, in general, students are encouraged to ensure that their way is their way and not just a mimic of someone else’s.

 

In addition to knowing the techniques, students are also expected to know the Knowledge base for each rank. This information can be found in the student handbook. Students are also expected to understand the application of the techniques in each rank. It is how each technique can be applied to a self-defense situation that differentiates MMA from any single art style. It is expected that students will continue to practice the techniques from their previous ranks with the goal of continuous improvement. At each belt level, a student should learn not only the new techniques for their next rank, but also learn more about the techniques from previous ranks.

 

Self-Defense

Self-defense is, and should be, a significant component to any martial arts curriculum. GSW Martial Arts Academy is no different in this regard. What is required for students to be promoted from rank to rank is not a prescribed set of self-defense techniques, but rather a prescribed number of techniques. This will allow students to focus on techniques that are meaningful to them and give instructors flexibility to teach to each student such techniques.

 

Each student, starting at white belt, is expected to learn a minimum of three new self-defense techniques prior to testing for their next rank. In example, this means that white belts are expected to know three, yellow belts are expected to know six, orange belts are expected to know nine, and so forth. In this case, “know” means the ability to instruct a fellow student (or instructor) what they are to do as an “attacker” and then properly, and safely, execute the technique as a “defender.”

 

Over time, the school will expand its body of knowledge of self-defense techniques, which will give the students more choices. Any technique that can be properly, and safely, executed in the school will be acceptable. Students are encouraged to help the school expand its body of knowledge by working with instructors to introduce new techniques.

 

Sparring

Sparring is, first and foremost, an exercise in control. Students are expected to exhibit control of their techniques in any and all line sparring and free sparring situations. Line sparring is when partners are given pre-defined technique to use in an attack/defend/counter-attack situation, then practice by alternating roles. Free sparring is when students are free to choose their own techniques for attack and must defend against their partner’s.

 

There are no technique requirements for sparring, only participation and demonstration of control. A student may be denied promotion for refusal to participate in sparring. There are, of course, medical exceptions to this. Any student with a medical reason for non-participation should make it clear to their instructor prior to testing. A student may also be denied promotion for lack of proper control during sparring. Students should understand that control is the ability to strike only as hard as intended regardless of what their partner does. “He walked into it” does excuse having hit someone too hard! Safety is always first. Please refer to the student handbook for sparring equipment requirements.

 

GSW MARTIAL ARTS ACADEMY
WEAPONS PROGRAM
STUDENT HANDBOOK


 

Preface


This document was written and designed with a need seen, solution found perspective. The students needed a stringent weapons program to round out the offerings at the school without going elsewhere to fill the gaps. From the knowledge of the forms we teach, to the techniques learned over the years, the two were combined into one Curriculum. Inside the curriculum it explains the reasons and how the program was created. There are many schools out there that have a similar curriculum but none could be found with the documentation in the depth of what has been compiled. Most Schools teach by interpretation and rote. This was designed as an instruction manual as well as a guide for the students. Hard work and countless hours have been spent in the culmination of this curriculum. With our Senior Master’s Blessing and even the hopes that Grandmaster will give his blessings to this curriculum, it will become a stable part of our school. This document is presented as my “Master’s Thesis” or 4th Degree Black Belt paper in hopes of reaching another goal for not only our school but a personal goal that I set for myself. God willing, and with blessings given, many students for years to come will use and hopefully enjoy what they will learn within.

George “Mr. Shannon” Wilhelm

3rd Degree Black Belt

Owner / Head Instructor for GSW Martial Arts Academy

(Copyright February 2014)

GSW Martial Arts Academy

Weapons Program

***Disclaimer: GSW Martial Arts Academy students should always realize that weapons can cause injury ranging from minor cuts and scrapes to severed limbs or even death and the students should always be respectful of the weapons they are studying and the potential for harm that they hold. Extreme caution and awareness of surroundings should always be used when practicing any weapon. Students should also be aware of any state and local laws that might affect their training. Each student that enters in to the GSW Martial Arts Weapons program must agree not to hold negligent or liable, GSW Martial Arts Academy, its instructors, staff, its affiliations, its students, or its hosting sites and staff accountable for any accident or injury obtained during the training of weapons. Students must agree to enter the program at their own risk. All minor students must have a parent or guardian agree and give consent for the student. A waiver must be signed and dated by each student and or guardian before being allowed to train. For a copy of the waiver to sign, or have signed, please see your instructor.

 What is a Weapon?

Dictionary .com describes a weapon as 1) any instrument or device for use in attack or defense in combat, fighting, or war, as a sword, rifle, or cannon 2) anything used against an opponent, adversary, or victim 3) any part or organ serving for attack or defense, as claws, horns, teeth, or stings.

Here at GSW Martial Arts Academy, we develop the use of many different kinds of weapons. First, our bodies are transformed through training and discipline to become a weapon for self-defense. Our bodies can be described as one weapon consisting of many different weapons such as but not limited to feet, knees, elbows, hands, teeth, shoulders, hips, and forehead. Our mind is developed for focus and reasoning to assist us in avoiding an attack as well as reasoning out a conflict before it becomes a physical confrontation. We strive to develop an inner spirit that can thwart off attack or give the impression that we don’t need to be attacked through building up our confidence and humility. While our bodies, our minds, and our inner spirit can be effective defensive weapons, we also incorporate the use of hand held items as weapons or by definition number 2 “anything used against an opponent, or adversary. We prefer to drop the term “victim” from the definition for the simple fact that the term victim describes someone that has been attacked and this can be misconstrued as the opposite of what we teach and study. Just as we would use our bodies as weapons of self-defense, anything we might pick up should only be used as weapons of self-defense. An example of this might be if someone were attacking us with a stick and we then pick up a stick of our own to defend against the attack.

At GSW Martial Arts Academy, we have developed a weapons program that teaches our students to use various Martial Arts weapons that have been created over centuries. Some weapons were developed as farming utensils, some were developed for hunting and gathering, and some were developed for battle. Our curriculum covers a wide range of hand held weapons that cover the majority of weapons used in most Martial Arts Schools today. As you read along, you will gain knowledge of the types of weapons we use, a brief history of each weapon, how our rank system works with our weapons program, and you should gain an insight as to how and why the curriculum was developed into the system taught at our Academy. Primarily though, our weapons curriculum was put in place for students that wish to further their martial arts training in weapons for competition purposes and self-defense.

Curriculum

Here at GSW Martial Arts Academy we have a 9 level Weapons Curriculum. Why 9 you might ask? In the lineage that GSW is rooted in, we use 9 degrees of Black Belt. The number 9 holds significance in many religions and societies all over the world. Throughout history, the number 9 has held significance in Chinese culture, Egyptian culture, European culture, and Greek Mythology.

According to Taekwon-Do (The Korean Art of Self Defense) also known as The Condensed Encyclopedia, it states “With degrees, the number 9 is not only the highest one among one digit numbers but also is the number of 3 multiplied by 3. In the Orient, three is the most esteemed of all the numbers. The Chinese character representing three is written:  The upper line symbolizes the heaven; the middle line, mortals; and the bottom line earth. It was believed that the individual who was successful in promoting his country, fellowmen and God, and able to reach an accord with all three would aspire to become King, which was written thusly:  The Chinese character for three and king are nearly synonymous. When the number three is multiplied by itself, the equation is nine, the highest of the high; therefore ninth degree is the highest of the high-ranking belts. It is also interesting to note that when the number 9 is multiplied by any other single digit number and the resultant figures are added together, the answer always equals 9, i.e. 9x1=9; 9x2=18, 1+8=9 and so on up to 9x9=81, 8+1=9. Since this is the only single digit number having this property, it again points to the number 9 as being the most positive of figures.” For more information on the significance of the number 9, a quick Google Search online will bring up numerous pages that can be researched. However, in staying with a traditional approach and keeping in line with current precedence, GSW Martial Arts Academy stayed with 9 defined levels in the Weapons Program.

 

Our Curriculum was designed off of the Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do forms that are taught at GSW Martial Arts Academy. Through past experience, Students would study weapons through other systems and have to learn new forms. This would create confusion and cause the students development to slow down.  By adapting the forms the students are already being taught, this helps solidify the forms in their minds as well as introduce them to the varying types of weapons without creating the needless confusion or adding extra difficulty.

The forms were designed to be as close to the original Chang Hun forms as possible with as little variance as can be done with each weapon considered. Not every weapon “plugs right in” so there will be some minor differences but the foot work will all be the same. This will make the transition to weapons forms easier than learning all new forms.

Also, these forms were not designed to be XMA style forms with a lot of Weapon tosses and throws. At GSW Martial Arts Academy we live by the belief that the longer a weapon is out of your hands, the greater the chance that the weapon can be taken from you. An example of this would be a High Spinning Bo Staff Toss in the air. The longer it is in the air the greater your chance of taking damage and not being able to catch it or for it to be knocked away and not accessible. If you are not holding a weapon, you are not fighting with weapons.

Here is a break-down of the 9 levels of our Weapons Curriculum:

Level 1: Escrima Sticks

Level 2: Escrima Sticks, Bo Staff

Level 3: Escrima Sticks, Bo Staff, Tonfas

Level 4: Escrima Sticks, Bo Staff, Tonfas, Kamas

Level 5: Escrima Sticks, Bo Staff, Tonfas, Kamas, Hand Axes

Level 6: Escrima Sticks, Bo Staff, Tonfas, Kamas, Hand Axes, Sai

Level 7: Escrima Sticks, Bo Staff, Tonfas, Kamas, Hand Axes, Sai, Nunchakus

Level 8: Escrima Sticks, Bo Staff, Tonfas, Kamas, Hand Axes, Sai, Nunchakus, Knives

Level 9: Escrima Sticks, Bo Staff, Tonfas, Kamas, Hand Axes, Sai, Nunchakus, Knives, Sword

This Curriculum is not meant to be all inclusive, all knowing, and definitive. But, it is meant to give the students a basic knowledge of the weapons, techniques to use with those weapons, and basic skills in using those weapons.

Rank System

Our Curriculum contains a rank system as each student learns the respective weapons per level. We do not issue “Belts” with our system for one simple reason: the students are already being issued belts in the Tae Kwon Do and More Program.  It is inconceivable for students to wear more than one belt at a time so we issue colored Chevrons to signify their rank in the GSW Martial Arts Academy Weapons Program.

The Chevrons will go on the left pant leg approximately 2 fingers height from the bottom of the cuff. The white chevron will be on the bottom and each advancing rank will be placed above the last.

The ranks are as follows:

Level 1: White (Beginner)

Level 2: Yellow

Level 3: Orange

Level 4: Green (Intermediate)

Level 5: Purple

Level 6: Blue

Level 7: Brown (Advanced)

Level 8: Red

Level 9:  Red/Black

Black Chevron"Weapons Specialist"

The Colors of the Chevrons are meant to match the belt system we use at GSW Martial Arts Academy. However, we consider the Black Chevron as a “Weapons Specialist”. This signifies that the student specializes and continues to learn and develop skills with the weapons they learn. We do not use the terms “Expert”, “Master”, or “Black Belt” as these terms signify that the student knows everything they need to know to use the weapons. Even the highest ranking Black Belt knows that there is always more to learn and since we do not issue belts in the weapons program the term “Black Belt” in weapons would be incorrect.

Weapons

As with every weapon there is the potential for damage or harm. Here at GSW Martial Arts Academy we use “Safety” weapons made of wood, plastic, rubber, or padded to ensure a safer training for our students. We use no “Live Blades” or sharpened blades on any bladed weapons. We also do not teach or qualify in any firearms. We teach strictly “Old School” martial arts weapons and do so in the safest way possible to protect our students.

Here is a brief history of the weapons that we train our students in. The information shown here on each of the weapons was found at www.reference.com which is a free online encyclopedia and the information is only a portion of the information that can be found there. GSW Martial Arts Academy cannot be held responsible for any misinformation found there. Here is what we have found:

Escrima Sticks:

Rattan, is an inexpensive wood from a type of vine in the Philippines, is the most common material for ticks and staves. Hard and durable, yet light weight, it can be fire hardened. It shreds under only the worst abuse and will not splinter like other woods do - thus making it a safe training tool. This aspect also makes it useful in defending against blades. Kamagong (Ironwood) is also sometimes used, but generally not for sparring, as it is dense enough to cause serious injury, although traditionally sparring does not include weapon to body contact; The participants are skilled enough to parry/counterstrike, showing respect in not intentionally hitting the training partner. Eskrima sticks are made in many sizes depending on the system and the respective ranges being trained. Common lengths range from 6" (15cm) to 96" (2.44m), with the most common ranging from 24" (61cm) to 36" (91cm). Eskrima sticks are a reflection of the artist, their system and methodology.

History

As with most martial arts, the history of Eskrima is surrounded by legends, making it difficult to pin down facts. This is especially true for Eskrima since a significant amount of its history is anecdotal, oral and promotional. Being a martial art for the common folk, some of its practitioners lacked the scholarly education to create a written history. This confusion is further complicated by the fact that there are actually many different fighting systems with different histories that are called Eskrima (or Arnis de Mano). One explanation for the origin of Eskrima systems is that they were originally the fighting systems possessed by every tribe in the Philippines and used by them to fight and defend against each other. Another explanation is that it evolved from Indian martial arts, as well as other Malay martial arts such as Tjakalele and Silat, brought to the Philippines by people who travelled through the Malay archipelago.

 Bo Staff: Staff (stick)

For other uses of the word staff, see staff.

A staff  is a large, thick stick or stick-shaped object used to help with walking, as a status symbol, as a component of traditional barrel making, or as a weapon.

The plural form of staff was originally staves (compare wolf, wolves and knife, knives), and in British and International English this is still preferred. In American English the usual plural form has become staffs, except in fantasy literature. The old English plural form staves collectively describes the wooden sticks bound by iron hoops to form traditional wooden barrels.

Weapon

Examples of staffs in Western Martial Arts include the English quarterstaff and the French bâton, and there are many martial arts, such as Italian Liu-bo, based around such staff-like weapons.

The Indian Silambam staff has been used as a weapon since at least the 2nd century, evident from references in ancient Sangam literature of the time. The martial art associated with the Silambam staff is also known as Silambam. This staff was later incorporated in several Malay martial arts such as Silat.

The Chinese staff is called gun (棍 pinyin gùn). Its practice is commonly divided into two main areas: Northern staff techniques (influenced by spear play) and Southern staff techniques. Many styles and techniques exist but the best known outside of China is the Shaolin Temple staff techniques as practiced by the monks in Chinese medieval times (Tang dynasty 900s-1000s) and later by their disciples in pre-modern China (1600s-1900s) by anti-Manchu/Ching dynasty revolutionaries (Han Chinese patriots) prior to the wide-spread use of firearms. The techniques made their usual dissemination throughout the rest of Asia to be blended in with other countries' native fighting techniques.

Several Japanese martial arts include the use of a short staff known as a (), or the longer .

Police forces have used sticks for centuries - actually, since specialized police forces have been trained for anti-riots tactics; before that, artillery or standard cavalry units were used. For the "t" shaped stick used by police forces, see tonfa.

Tonfa:
 

The tonfa, also known as tong fa or tuifa , is a traditional Okinawan weapon from which the modern side-handled police baton is derived.

History

The origin of the Tonfa is debated but experts believe it either originated in China or Indonesia. It is used in both Southeast Asian and Chinese martial arts and was possibly brought to Okinawa through their influence. A similar weapon called the mae sun sawk  is used in Thailand. Tradition holds that during the reign of Okinawan ruler Shō Shin, restrictions were placed on the use of weaponry in order to stabilize the country after a period of civil war. This restriction is said to have favored the development of unconventional agricultural tools as weapons of self-defense. In this context, it is believed that the tonfa was developed from a wooden handle of a millstone, a common agricultural implement much like the kama.


Kama
:

Are Okinawan and Japanese traditional farming implements similar to a sickle used for reaping crops and also employed as a weapon. Before being used in martial arts, the Kama was widely used throughout Asia to cut crops, mostly rice. It is commonly used in martial arts from Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines where it is found in many forms. The Kama has also been used in Chinese martial arts but not often. From one or both of these areas the Kama was brought to Okinawa and incorporated into the martial art Te (hand) and later Karate (empty hand).

The Kama is a formidable weapon, traditionally used in pairs, though in agricultural use it would be used one-handed, whilst the other hand grasped the stalks for cutting. Agricultural use of the Kama can be seen in Kurosawa's Seven Samurai during the harvesting sequence. As a weapon, both the point and sharpened edge of the metal blade are called in to use, Okinawan kata (forms) suggesting that the Kama could also be used to block, trap and disarm weapons used against the wielder. The hard edge of the Kama blade would traditionally be kept razor-sharp to enable efficient cutting of crops, which made it a lethal weapon in the right hands, though this is sometimes a cause of training accidents by unskilled wielders, for whom blunt training versions of the weapon are created.

Kama is often included in weapon training segments of karate, tae kwon do, silat and more obscurely in some kung fu systems. It is also a popular modern forms competition weapon. Modern forms competitors often simply adapt their empty hand routine while holding Kama with little actual Kama technique, or employ elaborate weapon-juggling routines that differ radically from the focused Okinawan forms.

 Variations

When a ball and chain are attached to the end of the Kama, it becomes a kusarigama, a formidable (if hard to master) weapon because its range makes it extremely difficult for opponents to approach the wielder.

Hand Axes: Ono (weapon)

Is the Japanese word for an "axe" or a "hatchet", and as such it is used to describe various tools of the similar basic structure. As with axes in other cultures, ono are sometimes employed as weapons. Generally four feet long with a heavy, over-sized steel blade. The few existing academic references to this weapon and documentation of extant examples are in connection with the sohei (warrior monks), who also adapt other agricultural tools as weapons. Ono specifically designed for military use is of extreme rarity.


Sai: Sai (weapon)

For other meanings of the word 'sai', see Sai (disambiguation).

Sai is the Ryukyu name for a traditional Okinawan weapon.

The basic form of the weapon is that of a pointed, rod-shaped baton, with two long, unsharpened projections (called yoku) attached to the handle. The very end of the handle is called the knuckle. Contrary to popular belief, the shaft of a traditional sai is not a blade.

Sai are constructed in a variety of forms. Traditional sai are round, while some reproductions have adapted an octagonal middle prong. The yoku are traditionally symmetrical, however, the Manji design developed by Taira Shinken employs oppositely facing yoku in an approximation to the Manji symbol (also known as the Swastika) from which it takes its name.

History

Some believe that the sai was always intended as a weapon while others hypothesize that it originated as an agricultural tool used to measure stalks, plow fields, plant rice, or to hold cart wheels in place. Evidence for the latter theory is limited. The sai is known to have been used in other parts of Asia before its arrival on Okinawa, such as India, China, Indonesia, Siam and Malaysia. Early evidence suggests Indonesia or the neighboring area as the sai's point of origin. In Malay the sai is known as a "chabang" (also spelled cabang or tjabang, meaning branch) and is thought to derive from the Indian trishula. The chabang quickly spread through the rest of Indo-China and may have reached Okinawa from one or more of these places simultaneously. In China it might have been known as the San-Ku-Chu.

Nunchakus: Nunchaku

[nuhn-chah-koo] Show IPA/nʌnˈtʃɑku/ Show Spelled

The Nunchaku  ( Chinese: 雙節棍,双截棍, shuāng jié gùn ; 兩節棍,两截棍, liǎng jié gùn  "Dual Section Staff"; 二節棍,二截棍 gèr jié gùn  "Two Section Staff"; Japanese: ヌンチャク ; 梢子棍, shōshikon  "Boatman's staff,"; Korean: 쌍절곤 (ssang jul gon)  ; also colloquially called " nunchucks ," "chain sticks," "chucks," "nunchukkas,") is a traditional weapon of the Kobudo weapons set and consists of two sticks connected at their ends with a short chain or rope. A sansetsukon is a similar weapon with three sticks attached on chains instead of two.

History

Although the certain origin of Nunchaku is disputed, it is thought to have been brought to Okinawa from China. The Japanese word Nunchaku itself comes from the Hokkien (Min Nan) word nng-chiat-kun (no-chiat kun) (兩節棍). When viewed etymologically from its Okinawan roots, nun comes from the word for twin, and chaku from shaku, a unit of measurement.

The popular belief is that the nunchaku was originally a short Southeast Asian flail used to thresh rice or soybeans (that is, separate the grain from the husk). It is possible that it was developed in response to the moratorium on edged weaponry under the Satsuma daimyo after invading Okinawa in the 17th century, and that the weapon was most likely conceived and used exclusively for that end, as the configuration of actual flails and bits are unwieldy for use as a weapon. Also, peasant farmers were forbidden conventional weaponry such as arrows or blades so they improvised using only what they had available, farm tools such as the sickle. The modern weapon would be an effective flail.

Some sources say that the first Song Emperor was in battle when an enemy general cut the end off of his staff. Instead of using a different staff, he connected the two pieces with a short section of iron chain, creating a weapon known a "sweeper". At the time, it was not illegal to carry a weapon, but it was inconvenient to carry a sweeper because it was a long stick with a loose section, so some people shortened the staff section so that the weapon could be tucked in a belt. This was called a "small sweeper", later renamed the nunchaku.

Another popular theory is that the nunchaku originated from China in the Song Dynasty. It was named "da pan long gun"(大盤龍棍), meaning great coiled dragon stick. The weapon is composed of one long stick and a short stick connected by horse hair. It was commonly used in wars against cavalry to trap horse legs. The weapon eventually evolved into a short range weapon as seen in our present day nunchaku.

The nunchaku as a weapon has surged in popularity since martial artist Bruce Lee used it in his movies in the 1970s.

Knives: Knife

A knife is a handheld sharp-edged instrument consisting of handle attached to a blade used for cutting. The knife is a tool that can be used as a weapon. Its origins date as far back as two-and-a-half million years ago, as evidenced by the Oldowan tools.

History

The earliest knives were shaped by knapping (percussive flaking) of rock, particularly harder rocks such as obsidian and flint. During the Paleolithic era Homo habilis likely made similar tools out of wood, bone, and similar highly perishable materials that have not survived. As recent as five thousand years ago, as advances in metallurgy progressed, stone, wood, and bone blades were gradually succeeded by copper, bronze, iron, and eventually steel. The first metal (copper) knives were symmetrical double edged daggers, which copied the earlier flint daggers. In Europe the first single edged knives appeared during the middle bronze age. These replaced daggers, which by that time had evolved into swords. Modern knives may be made from many different materials such as alloy tool steels, carbon fiber, ceramics, and titanium. There is a very active community of modern custom knife makers and collectors, who often pioneer the use of new materials in knives. In the United States, The American Bladesmith Society promotes forged blades; the Knifemakers Guild promotes all custom knives.

Sword: sword

Are a weapon of offense and defense in personal combat, consisting of a blade with a sharp point and one or two cutting edges, set in a hilt with a handle protected by a metal case or cross guard. The sword may have developed from the dagger at the beginning of the Bronze Age. It was not, however, until the more durable iron sword was introduced in the early Iron Age that the sword became an effective weapon. Greek and Roman swords were very short, with pointed ends, and had two cutting edges. Medieval knights used two types of swords: a short sword with a pointed end that was used with one hand and a heavy two-handed sword with a rounded end. During the Middle Ages the best blades were those made by the Arabs in Damascus and Toledo. Swords were widely used in the Middle East and E Asia as well as in Europe. The scimitar, used by the Persians and Arabs, is a curved steel sword. One of the best known of the East Asian swords is the Japanese samurai sword, consisting of a curved single-edged tempered steel blade set in a long handle. As a highly personal weapon the sword attained symbolic importance; surrendering one's sword became a token of submission, and the custom of taking an officer's sword away from him and breaking the blade when he was dismissed from the service in disgrace arose because a sword is the mark of an officer and a gentleman. During the Crusades and later, the sword, because of its shape, frequently was used to symbolize the Cross. The sword is now obsolete as a weapon and is carried in some military units for decorative purposes in times of peace. Special types of swords are the rapier, the épée, and the saber. See fencing.

Ready to Begin?

Now that you have learned a little bit about the weapons and the Curriculum for the GSW Martial Arts Academy Weapons Program, you are almost ready to begin. All you have left to do is find the dedication and the time you need to train properly and develop your skills as a weapons practitioner. Some of the forms you will be taught have been tested, tried, and true. Students have used them to compete against other schools and have won awards using them. Will you be the next one to bring home a trophy or medal using what you will learn? Only time will tell. Make sure you speak with your instructor for a copy of the waiver and once it is signed and turned in you are ready to begin your journey in the GSW Martial Arts Academy Weapons Program.

Welcome!


Escrima Level 1 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Downward  Outer Strike to Knee with Left Stick (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

3)    Downward  Outer Strike to Knee to with Right Stick (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

5)    Downward  Outer Strike to the Knee with Left Stick (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

7)    Downward  Outer Strike to the Knee with Right Stick (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

9)    Upper Outward Strike to the Temple with Left Stick (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

11)  Upper Outward Strike to the Temple with Right Stick (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

13)  Upper Outward Strike to the Temple with Left Stick (Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

15)  Upper Outward Strike to the Temple with Right Stick (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Yell

18)  Step backward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Escrima Techniques to learn.

1)    Temple-Temple

2)    Temple-Knee

3)    Temple-Knee-Temple

4)    Temple-Knee-Temple-around the head block-Temple

5)    Temple-Knee-Temple-ankle sweep-instep strike

6)    Rolling Flip Strike

7)    Jab

8)    Escape

9)    Weapon Clear

Escrima Counts to Learn

1)    Chinese 4 Count

2)    Chinese 6 Count

3)    Okinawan 6 Count

Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Knee

3)    Hand

4)    Collar Bone

5)    Under Chin

6)    Elbow

7)    Ankle

8)    Instep

Basic Functionality of Escrima

1)    Strike points of sticks

2)    Proper hand position on sticks

3)    Proper Striking motion with sticks

4)    Using sticks as leverage

5)    Fluid motion

6)      Extension of body   


Escrima Level 2 Form   (Based on TKD Dan Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

2)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

3)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

4)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

5)    Downward  Outer Strike to the Knee with Left Stick (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

7)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Yell, then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

9)    Dual Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

11)  Dual Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

13)  Downward Outer Strike to the Knee with Left Stick (Front Stance) then twist and X-block behind with Both Sticks

14)  Turn back forward and Swooping Upper Block with Left Stick (Front Stance)

15)  Step forward and Swooping Upper Block with Right Stick (Front Stance)

16)  Step forward and Swooping Upper Block with Left Stick (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Swooping Upper Block with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Yell, then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

18)  Straight Outward Neck Strike with Left Stick (Back Stance)

19)  Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

20)  Straight Outward Neck Strike with Right Stick (Back Stance)

21)  Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Bo Staff Level 2 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Left Downward Strike to Ankle with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

3)    Downward Outer Strike to Ankle with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

5)    Downward Outer Strike to the Ankle with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

7)    Downward Outer Strike to the Ankle with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Inward Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

9)    Left J-Hook Disarm with Left Hand End (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and inward Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

11)  Right J-Hook Disarm with Right Hand End (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

13)  Left J-Hook Disarm with Left Hand End (Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

15)  Right J-Hook Disarm with Right Hand End (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Yell

18)  Step backward and Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward and Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Bo Staff Techniques to learn.

1)    One handed side to side spin

2)    Two handed front spin

3)    One handed front spin

4)    Two handed over the head spin

5)    Two handed behind the back spin

6)    One handed finger spin (for dexterity)

7)    Side Strike

8)    Reverse Side Strike

9)    Collar bone strike

10)  Distance Strike

11)  Jab

12)  Disarm

13)  2 hand slide switch

14)  Blocks

15)  Weapon Clear

Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Knee

3)    Hand

4)    Collar Bone

5)    Under Chin

6)    Ankle

7)    Instep

8)    Groin

Basic Functionality of Bo Staff

1)    Strike points of Bo Staff

2)    Proper hand position on Bo Staff

3)    Proper Striking motion with Bo Staff

4)    Proper Arm position using Bo Staff

5)    Using Bo Staff as leverage

6)    Hand movement on Bo Staff

7)    Fluid motion

8)    Extension of body   


Escrima Level 3 Form   (Based on TKD Do-San Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Outer Block with Left Stick (Front Stance)

2)    Temple Strike with Right Stick

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

3)    Outer Block with Right Stick (Front Stance)

4)    Temple Strike with Left Stick

Step Up Left to Right then 90* turn to the left

5)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

6)    Step forward and Solar-Plexus Jab with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Yell, then Deflect with Right Stick and 360* Spin

7)    Outer Block with Left Stick (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Outer Block with Right Stick (Front Stance)

X Block and then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

9)    Outer Block with Left Stick (Front Stance)

10)  Temple Strike with Right Stick

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

11)  Outer Block with Right Stick (Front Stance)

12)  Temple Strike with Left Stick

Step Up to Closed Stance then 135* turn to the left

13)  Break Out Strike to the arms with Both Sticks (Front Stance)

14)  Right Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

15)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick

16)  Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick

Step Back to Closed Stance 90* turn to the Right

17)  Break Out Strike to the arms with Both Sticks (Front Stance)

18)  Left Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

19)  Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick

20)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick

Turn to the Left 45*

21)  Swooping Rising Block with Left Stick (Front Stance)

22)  Step forward and Swooping Rising Block with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Yell, Then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 180*

23)  Straight Outer Strike to Neck with Left Stick to the left (Horse Stance)

24)  Step Left to Right into Horse Stance Straight Outer Strike to Neck with Right Stick to the right

Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Bo Staff Level 3 Form   (Based on TKD Dan-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Swooping Upward Strike under Chin with Left Hand End (Back Stance)

2)    Step forward and inward Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

3)    Swooping Upward Strike under Chin with Right Hand End (Back Stance)

4)    Step forward and inward Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

5)    Downward Outer Strike to the Ankle with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Reverse Side Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

7)    Step forward and Side Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Reverse Side Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*


9)   
 Left Hand Stick Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and inward Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

11)  Right Hand Stick Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

13)  Ankle Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance) twist body and Single Spin behind

14)  Face forward and Upper Block with Whole Staff (Front Stance)

15)  Step Forward, Single Open Hand Slide Clear in front and Upper Block with Whole Staff (Front Stance)

16)  Step Forward, Single Open Hand Slide Clear in front and Upper Block with Whole Staff (Front Stance)

17)  Step Forward, Single Open Hand Slide Clear in front and Upper Block with Whole Staff (Front Stance)

 Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



18)
 Side Strike with Right Hand End (Back Stance)

19)  Step forward and Reverse Side Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

20)  Reverse Side Strike with Left Hand End (Back Stance)

21)  Step Forward and Side Strike With Left Hand End (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Tonfa Level 3 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Downward Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)    Downward Outer Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)    Downward Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


7)    Downward Outer Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


9)   
Upper Extended Strike to the Temple with Left Tonfa (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)  Upper Extended Strike to the Temple with Right Tonfa (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left



13)
 Upper Extended Strike to the Temple with Left Tonfa (Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*



15)
 Upper Extended Strike to the Temple with Right Tonfa (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Short End Punch Strike with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Yell



18)
 Step backward and Short End Punch with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward and Short End Punch with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Tonfas Techniques to learn.

1)    Flick Strike

2)    Short end Strike

3)    Blocks

4)    Handle to end change

5)    End to Handle Change

6)    Hooking

7)    Handle strike

8)    Weapons clear

9)    Cross block

10)  Flick Cross Block

Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Knee

3)    Hand

4)    Collar Bone

5)    Under Chin

6)    Ankle

7)    Instep

Basic Functionality of Tonfas

1)    Strike points of Tonfas

2)    Proper hand position on Tonfas

3)    Proper Striking motion with Tonfas

4)    Proper Arm position using Tonfas

5)    Using angles

6)    Hand movement on Tonfas

7)    Fluid motion

8)    Extension of body   


Escrima Level 4 Form   (Based on TKD Won-Hyo Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

2)    Temple Strike with Right Stick (Cat Stance)

3)    Flip Strike with Left Stick (Long Back Stance)

Step Up Facing Front then to Right 90*

4)    Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

5)    Temple Strike with Left Stick (Cat Stance)

6)    Flip Strike with Right Stick (Long Back Stance)

Step Back Right to left then Left 90*

7)    Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Sticks

8)    Side Kick with Left foot and land in Back Stance

9)    Dual Guarding block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward Dual Guarding Stance with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

11)  Step forward Dual Guarding Stance with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward Dual Flip Strike with Both Sticks (Front Stance)

Yell, X Block and then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

13)  Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

14)  Temple Strike with Right Stick (Cat Stance)

15)  Flip Strike with Left Stick (Long Back Stance)

Step Up Facing Front then to Right 90*

16)  Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

17)  Temple Strike with Left Stick (Cat Stance)

18)  Flip Strike with Right Stick (Long Back Stance)

Step up to low Closed T Stance with Both Sticks pointed up

19)  Step forward with Left Foot then Right Stick Circle Block (Front Stance)

20)  Front Kick with Right Foot (Front Stance)

21)  Flip Strike with Left Stick

22)  Circle Block with Left Stick

23)  Front Kick with Left Foot (Front Stance)

24)  Flip Strike with Right Stick

25)  Step Up with Right Foot to face left in Closed Fighting Stance Both Sticks

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot

Yell, then Land with Right foot crossed behind left

27)  Turn to the left 270* to Fighting Stance with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

28)  Step up to middle then 90* to right to Fighting Stance with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Bo Staff Level 4 Form   (Based on TKD Do-San Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)     Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

2)    Temple Strike with Right Hand End

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

3)     Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

4)     Temple Strike with Left Hand End

Step Up Left to Right then 90* turn to the left

5)    Swooping Upper Jab under chin with Left Hand End (Back Stance)

6)    Step Forward Full Circle, Full Length Collar Bone/Head Strike with  Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Yell, then Side to Side Clear with Whole Staff and 360* Spin

7)    Side Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Reverse Side Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

9)    Temple Strike with Left Hand End (Front Stance)

10)  Temple Strike with Right Hand End

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

11)  Temple Strike with Right Hand End (Front Stance)

12)  Temple Strike with Left Hand End

Step Up to Closed Stance then 135* turn to the left

13)  Level Rising Strike to the arms with Whole Staff (Front Stance)

14)  Right Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

15)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Hand End

16)  Inward Temple Strike with Left Hand End

Step Back to Closed Stance 90* turn to the Right

17)  Level Rising Strike to the arms with Whole Staff (Front Stance)

18)  Left Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

19)  Inward Temple Strike with Left Hand End

20)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Hand End

Turn to the Left 45*

21)  Level Upper Block with Whole Staff (Front Stance)

22)  Step forward and Single Open Hand Slide Clear and Level Upper Block with Whole Staff (Front Stance)

Yell, Then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 180* to Horse Stance

23)  One Hand Straight Outer Strike to Neck with Left Hand End to the left (Horse Stance)

24)  Step Left to Right into Horse Stance One Hand Straight Outer Strike to Neck with Right Hand End to the right

Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Tonfa Level 4 Form   (Based on TKD Dan-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Tonfas extended (Back Stance)

2)    Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

3)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Tonfas Extended (Back Stance)

4)    Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)    Downward Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

7)    Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



9)   
 Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)  Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


13)  Downward Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance) twist body and X Block with Both Tonfas extended behind

14)  Face forward and Upper Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

15)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

16)  Step forward and Upper Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

 Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



18)
 Extended Strike with Left Tonfa to Temple (Back Stance)

19)  Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


20)  Extended Strike with Right Tonfa to Temple (Back Stance)

21)  Step forward and Punch Strike with short end of Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Kamas Level 4 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Downward Outer Slice with Left Kama (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)    Downward Outer Slice with Right Kama (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)    Downward Outer Slice with Left Kama(Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama(Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


7)    Downward Outer Slice with Right Kama(Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama(Front Stance)

90* turn to the left

9)    Circular Outer Slice  with Left Kama(Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama(Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)  Circular Outer Slice  with Right Kama(Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama(Front Stance)

90* turn to the left



13)
 Circular Outer Slice  with Left Kama(Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama(Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*



15)
 Circular Outer Slice  with Right Kama(Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama(Front Stance)


17)
 Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama(Front Stance)

Yell



18)
 Step backward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward and Flip Stabbing Strike Right Kama (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Kamas Techniques to learn.

1)    Flick Slice

2)    Circular Slice

3)    Blocks

4)    Directional Changes

5)    Hooking

6)    Handle strike

7)    Weapons clear

8)    Cross Slice

9)     Flick Cross Slice

Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Knee

3)    Hand

4)    Collar Bone

5)    Under Chin

6)    Ankle

7)    Instep

8)    Neck

Basic Functionality of Kamas

1)    Bladed portions and points of Kamas

2)    Proper hand position on Kamas

3)    Proper Striking motion with Kamas

4)    Proper Arm position using Kamas

5)    Using angles

6)    Hand movement on Kamas

7)    Fluid motion

8)    Extension of body   

 


Escrima Level 5 Form   (Based on TKD Yul-Guk Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with Left Foot to Horse Stance, Hold Right Stick straight out pointing up

1)    (Very Slowly with Power) Solar Plexus Jab with Left Stick

2)    Fast Collar Bone Strike with Right Stick

3)    Fast Collar Bone Left Stick

Double side Step to the Right remaining in Horse Stance, Hold Left Stick straight out pointing up

4)    (Very Slowly with Power) Solar Plexus Jab with Right Stick

5)    Fast Collar Bone Strike with Left Stick

6)    Fast Collar Bone Right Stick

Step Up with Right Foot then 45* to the right to a Front Stance

7)    Outer Block with Right Stick

8)    Front Kick to Chin with Left foot and land in Front Stance

9)    Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick

10)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick

Step Back and Up with Left Foot then 45* to the left to a Front Stance

11)  Outer Block with Left Stick

12)  Front Kick to Chin with Right foot and land in Front Stance

13)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick

14)  Inward Temple Strike with Left Stick

Step Back and Up with Right Foot then forward to a Front Stance

15)  (Slowly) Right Level Sweeping Motion with Right Stick

16)  (Slowly) Left Level Sweeping Motion with Left Stick

17)  Fast Flip Strike with Right Stick

Step Forward to a Front Stance

18)  (Slowly) Left Level Sweeping Motion with Left Stick

19)  (Slowly) Right Level Sweeping Motion with Right Stick

20)  Fast Flip Strike with Left Stick

21)  Step forward and Flip Strike with Right Stick

Yell

22)  Step up with Left Foot to Closed Fighting Stance with Both Sticks

23)  Side Kick with Left Foot and Land in Front Stance

24)  Hook Left Stick behind Neck and Butt End Strike With Right Stick to Bridge of Nose

25)  Step Up with Right Foot 90* to a Closed Fighting Stance looking behind with Both Sticks

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot landing in a Front Stance

27)  Hook Right Stick behind Neck and Butt End Strike with Left Stick to Bridge of Nose

Step Up with Left Foot to Closed Stance and Low X Block with Both Sticks

28)  90* to Left Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

29)  Step Forward and Solar Plexus Jab with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Step Back and Up with Right foot 90* to Closed Stance and Low X Block with Both Sticks

30)  90* to Right Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

31)  Step Forward and Solar Plexus Jab with Left Stick (Front Stance)

Step Back and up with Left Foot then 90* to Left into Front Stance

32)  Outer Block with Left Stick

33)  Temple Strike with Right Stick

34)  Step Forward and Outer Block with Right Stick

35)  Temple Strike with Left Stick

36)  Bring Left Foot up and jump turning 90* to the right landing in a Crossed Stance with Right Foot behind Left Foot then Back Handed Temple Strike with Left Stick

Yell, Turn to the right 270*

37)  Reinforced Block with Both Sticks with Right Stick level

38)  Step together step to left 180* Reinforce Block with Both Sticks with Left stick level

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Bo Staff Level 5 Form   (Based on TKD Won-Hyo Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Square Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

2)    Reverse Strike with Right Hand End (Cat Stance)

3)    Left Single Handed Outer Strike with Whole Staff (Long Back Stance)

Step Up Facing Front then to Right 90*

4)    Square Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

5)    Reverse Strike with Left Hand End (Cat Stance)

6)    Right Single Handed Outer Strike with Whole Staff (Long Back Stance)

Step Back Right to left then Left 90*

7)    Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Whole Staff angled across body with Left Hand End up

8)    Side Kick with Left foot and land in Back Stance

9)    Swooping Strike with Left Hand End (Back Stance)

10)  Step Forward and Swooping Strike with Right Hand End

11)  Step Forward and Swooping Strike with Left Hand End

12)  Step forward Counter Clockwise Single Front Spin ending with Whole Staff outward in Right Hand (Front Stance)

Yell, X Block and then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

13)  Square Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

14)  Reverse Strike with Right Hand End (Cat Stance)

15)  Left Single Handed Outer Strike with Whole Staff (Long Back Stance)

Step Up Facing Front then to Right 90*

16)  Square Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

17)  Reverse Strike with Left Hand End (Cat Stance)

18)  Right Single Handed Outer Strike with Whole Staff (Long Back Stance)

Step up to Low Closed T Stance with Whole Staff in Right hand Level out to the Right Side

19)  Step forward with Left Foot then Dual Right One Handed Spin with Whole Staff Left to right (Front Stance)

20)  Front Kick with Right Foot (Front Stance)

21)  Collar Bone Strike with Left Hand End

22)  Dual Left One Handed Spin with Whole Staff Right to Left

23)  Front Kick with Left Foot (Front Stance)

24)  Collar Bone Strike with Right Hand End

25)  Step Up with Right Foot to face left in Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Whole Staff angled across body with Right Hand End up

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot

Yell, then Land with Right Foot crossed behind Left Foot

27)  Turn to the left 270* to Fighting Stance with Left Hand End up (Back Stance)

28)  Step up to middle then 90* to right to Fighting Stance with Right Hand End Up (Back Stance)

Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Tonfa Level 5 Form   (Based on TKD Do-San Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)     Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

2)    Short End Punch with Right Tonfa

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

3)     Outer Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

4)     Short End Punch with Left Tonfa

Step up Left to Right then 90* turn to the left

5)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Tonfas extended (Back Stance)

6)    Step Forward and Solar Plexus Jab with  Right Tonfa extended supported with left arm underneath (Front Stance)

Yell, 360* Spin

7)    Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Outer Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

9)    Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

10)  Short End Punch with Right Tonfa

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

11)  Outer Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

12)  Short End Punch with Left Tonfa

Step Up to Closed Stance then 135* turn to the left

13)  Crossing Break Out to arms with Both Tonfas (Front Stance)

14)  Right Leg Front Snap Kick landing in Front Stance

15)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Tonfa extended

16)  Inward Temple Strike with Left Tonfa extended

Step Back to Closed Stance 90* turn to the Right

17)  Crossing Break Out to arms with Both Tonfas (Front Stance)

18)  Left Leg Front Snap Kick landing in Front Stance

19)  Inward Temple Strike with Left Tonfa extended

20)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Tonfa extended

Turn to the Left 45*

21)  Rising Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

22)  Step forward and Rising Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Yell, Then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 180* to Horse Stance

23)  Straight Outer Strike to Neck with Left Tonfa to the left (Horse Stance)

24)  Step Left to Right into Horse Stance Straight Outer Strike to Neck with Right Tonfa to the right

Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Kama Level 5 Form   (Based on TKD Dan-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas blades out (Back Stance)

2)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas extended (Back Stance)

4)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward Outer Slice with Left Kama (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama (Front Stance)

7)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with  Right Kama (Front Stance)

Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



9)   
Flip Kamas Inverted and Square Block with Both Kamas blades out (Back Stance)

10)  Flip Kamas back and Step forward then Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)  Flip Kamas Inverted and Square Block with Both Kamas blades out  (Back Stance)

12)  Flip Kamas back and Step forward then Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


13)
 Downward Outer Slice with Left Kama (Front Stance) twist body and Inverted Cross Slice with Both Kamas behind

14)  Face forward and Upper Block with Left Kama inverted blade out (Front Stance)

15)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Kama inverted blade out (Front Stance)

16)  Step forward and Upper Block with Left Kama inverted blade out (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Kama inverted blade out (Front Stance)

 Yell, flip Kamas back to normal, Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



18)
 Extended Slice to the side with Left Kama to Neck (Back Stance)

19)  Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Right Kama (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


20)  Extended Slice to the side with Right Kama to Neck (Back Stance)

21)  Step forward and Flip Stabbing Strike with Left Kama (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Hand Axes Level 5 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Downward Outer Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)    Downward Outer Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Flip Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward Outer Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


7)   
Downward Outer Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Flip Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


9)    Outer Slice  with Left Axe (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)
 Outer Slice  with Right Axe (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Flip Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left



13)
 Outer Slice  with Left Axe (Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*



15)
 Outer Slice  with Right Axe(Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Flip Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Yell


18)
 Step backward and Flip Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward and Flip Slice Right Axe (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.


Hand Axes Techniques to learn.

1)    Flip Slice

2)    Outer Slice

3)    Blocks

4)    Directional Changes

5)    Cross Slicing

6)    Handle strike

7)    Weapons clear

8)    Flip Cross Slice

Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Knee

3)    Hand

4)    Collar Bone

5)    Under Chin

6)    Ankle

7)    Elbows

8)    Neck

9)    Wrist

10)  Under Arm

11)  Belly

Basic Functionality of Hand Axes

1)    Bladed portions and points of Axes

2)    Proper hand position on Axes

3)    Proper Striking/Slicing motion with Axes

4)    Proper Arm position using Axes

5)    Using angles

6)    Hand movement on Axes

7)    Fluid motion

8)    Extension of body   

 


Escrima Level 6 Form   (Based on TKD Joon-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with Left Foot to Back Stance

1)    Backhanded Temple Jab with Left Stick (Back Stance)

2)    Front Snap Kick with Left Foot (Land in Cat Stance)

3)    Step Forward and Groin Jab with  Right Stick (Back Stance)

Step back up to a Closed Stance facing forward.

4)    Backhanded Temple Jab with Right Stick (Back Stance)

5)    Front Snap Kick with Right Foot (Land in Cat Stance)

6)    Step forward and Groin Jab with Left Stick (Back Stance)

Step Up with Left Foot then out 90* left in a Back Stance

7)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks

8)    Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into a Front Stance and Upper Elbow Strike with Right Elbow.

Step forward into a Back Stance

9)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks

10)  Half Step to the Right with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Upper Elbow Strike with the Left Elbow.

11)  Step Forward to Front Stance Double Temple Strike with Both Sticks

12)  Step Forward to Front Stance Double Jab under floating ribs with Both Sticks

Yell, Double half step turn 180*

13)  Upper Cross Block with Both Sticks

14)  90*to left Temple Strike with Left Stick (Back Stance)

15)  Opposite Temple Strike with Left Stick (Same Stance)

16)  Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into a Front Stance and Solar Plexus Jab with Right Stick.

Step Back up with Left Foot to a Closed Stance then 90* right

17)  90*to left Temple Strike with Right Stick (Back Stance)

18)  Opposite Temple Strike with Right Stick (Same Stance)

19)  Half Step to the left with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Solar Plexus Jab with Left Stick.

Step back up with Right Foot to a Closed Stance then forward

20)  High/Low Double  Strike(Left Stick on top) with Both Sticks (Front Stance)

21)  Retract Left Stick, aim guard with Right Stick (Cat Stance) Throat jab in Long Back Stance with Left Stick.

22)  Side Kick with Right Foot

23)  Land in Front Stance and High/Low Double  strike(Right Stick on top) with Both Sticks

24)  Retract Right Stick, aim guard with Left Stick (Cat Stance) Throat jab in Long Back Stance with Right Stick

25)  Side Kick with Left Foot

26)  Land in Back Stance Fighting Stance with Both Sticks

27)  Twist to the right 135*  (Front Stance) Slowly pivot back facing front in Pressing Block Disarm with Both Sticks

28)  Step Forward into Back Stance Fighting Stance with Both Sticks

29)  Twist to the Left 135*  (Front Stance) Slowly pivot back facing front in Pressing Block Disarm with Both Sticks

30)  Step up with Left Foot to Closed Stance Facing 90* left and Hook Punch with Right Stick pointing down

Yell,

31)  Step out with Right Foot to Square Block to the Right with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

32)  Step Back to center with Right Foot then step to left and Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Bo Staff Level 6 Form   (Based on TKD Yul-Guk Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with Left Foot to Horse Stance, holding Bo Staff level against hips in both hands.

1)    (Very Slowly with Power) Staff Level in both hands push out with Whole Staff

2)    Fast Temple Strike with Right End

3)    Fast Temple Strike with Left End

Double side Step to the Right remaining in Horse Stance, holding Bo Staff level against hips in both hands.

4)    (Very Slowly with Power) Staff Level both hands push with Whole Staff

5)    Fast Temple Strike with Left End

6)    Fast Temple Strike with Right End

Step Up with Right Foot then 45* to the right to a Front Stance

7)    J Hook Disarm with Right End

8)    Front Snap Kick to Chin with Left foot and land in Front Stance

9)    Inward Temple Strike with Left End

10)  Inward Temple Strike with Right End

Step Back and Up with left foot then 45* to the left to a Front Stance

11)  J Hook Disarm with Left End

12)  Front Snap Kick to Chin with Right foot and land in Front Stance

13)  Inward Temple Strike with Right End

14)  Inward Temple Strike with Left End

Step Back and then Up with Right Foot then forward to a Front Stance

15)  (Slowly) 2 hand Right and Left Double Spin with Whole Staff

16)  (Slowly) 2 hand Right and Left Double Spin with Whole Staff

17)  Full Staff Extended Strike with Right end

Step Forward to a Front Stance

18)  (Slowly) 2 hand Right and Left Double Spin with Whole Staff

19)  (Slowly) 2 hand Right and Left Double Spin with Whole Staff

20)  Full Staff Extended Strike with Left End

21)  Step forward and Jab Strike to the Solar Plexus with Right End

Yell

22)  Step up with Left Foot to Closed Fighting Stance with Whole Staff against body and Left End up

23)  Side Kick with Left Foot and Land in Front Stance

24)  Jab Strike to top of foot with Left End

25)  Step Up with Right Foot 90* to a Closed Fighting Stance with Whole Staff against body and Right End up

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot landing in Front Stance

27)  Jab Strike to top of foot with Left End


Step Up with Left Foot to Closed Stance and 2 Handed Front Double Spin counter-clockwise with Whole Staff

28)  90* to Left Square Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

29)  Step Forward and Solar Plexus Jab with Right End (Front Stance)


Step Back and Up with Right Foot 90* to Closed Stance and 2 Handed Front Double Spin clockwise with Whole Staff

30)  90* to Right Square Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

31)  Step Forward and Solar Plexus Jab with Left End (Front Stance)

Step Back and up with Left Foot then 90* to Left into Front Stance

32)  Temple Strike with Left End

33)  Temple Strike with Right End

34)  Step Forward and Temple Strike with Right End

35)  Temple Strike with Left End

36)  Bring Left Foot up and jump turning 90* to the right landing in a Crossed Stance with Right Foot behind Left Foot then Low Groin Jab with Left End

Yell, Turn to the right 270*

37)  Under the Chin Jab Strike with Right End with tight support against forearm

38)  Step together step to left 180* Under the Chin Jab Strike with Left End tight support against forearm

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Tonfa Level 6 Form   (Based on TKD Won-Hyo Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

2)    Switch Left Tonfa and Hook behind neck and Temple Strike with Right Tonfa Short End (Cat Stance)

3)    Switch Left Tonfa back and Outer Flip Strike to Temple with Left Tonfa (Long Back Stance)

Step Up Facing Front then to Right 90*

4)    Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

5)    Switch Right Tonfa and Hook behind neck and Temple Strike with Left Tonfa (Cat Stance)

6)    Switch Right Tonfa back and Outer Flip Strike to Temple with Right Tonfa (Long Back Stance)

Step Back Right to left then Left 90*

7)    Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Tonfas 

8)    Side Kick with Left foot and land in Back Stance

9)    Dual Guarding Extended Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

10)  Step Forward and return Both Tonfas and Dual Guarding Extended Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

11)  Step Forward and return Both Tonfas and Dual Guarding Extended Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Club Strike with Right Tonfa to collar bone and Left Tonfa in supporting Guard.

Yell, Parallel Block and then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

13)  Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

14)  Switch Left Tonfa and Hook behind neck and Temple Strike with Right Tonfa Short End (Cat Stance)

15)  Switch Left Tonfa back and Outer Flip Strike to Temple with Left Tonfa (Long Back Stance)

Step Up Facing Front then to Right 90*
 

16)  Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

17)  Switch Right Tonfa and Hook behind neck and Temple Strike with Left Tonfa (Cat Stance)

18)  Switch Right Tonfa back and Outer Flip Strike to Temple with Right Tonfa (Long Back Stance)

Step up to low Closed T Stance with Both Tonfas in Extended Strikes to either side

19)  Step forward with Left Foot then Right Circle Outer Block with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

20)  Front Kick with Right Foot (Front Stance)

21)  Short End Reverse Punch with Left Tonfa

22)  Left Circle Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Front Stance)

23)  Front Kick with Left Foot (Front Stance)

24)  Short End Reverse Punch with Right Tonfa

25)  Step Up with Right Foot to face left in Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Tonfas to the right

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot

Yell, then Land with Right foot crossed behind Left Foot


27)
 Turn to the left 270* to Fighting Stance with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

28)  Step up to middle then 90* to right to Fighting Stance with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Kama Level 6 Form   (Based on TKD Do-San Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)     Outer Slice with Left Kama (Front Stance)

2)    Flip Strike with Right Kama

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

3)     Outer Slice with Right Kama (Front Stance)

4)     Flip Strike with Left Kama

Step up Left to Right then 90* turn to the left

5)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas (Back Stance) blades out

6)    Flip Kama With blade down Groin Slice up with  Right Kama supported with left arm underneath right arm (Front Stance)

Yell, and 360* Spin

7)    Outer Slice with Left Kama (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Outer Slice with Right Kama (Front Stance)

Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

9)    Outer Slice with Left Kama (Front Stance)

10)  Flip Strike with Right Kama

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

11)  Outer Slice with Right Kama (Front Stance)

12)  Flip Strike with Left Kama

Step Up to Closed Stance then 135* turn to the left

13)  Flip Both Kamas inverted and Crossing Break Out to arms with Both Kamas (Front Stance)

14)  Right Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

15)  Inward Throat Slice with Right Kama inverted

16)  Inward Throat Slice with Left Kama inverted

Step Back to Closed Stance 90* turn to the Right

17)  Crossing Break Out to arms with Both Kamas inverted (Front Stance)

18)  Left Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

19)  Inward Throat Slice with Left Kama inverted

20)  Inward Throat Slice with Right Kama inverted

Turn to the Left 45*

21)  Rising Block with Left Kama inverted (Front Stance)

22)  Step forward and Rising Block with Right Kama inverted(Front Stance)

Yell, Then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 180* to Horse Stance

23)  Flip Both Kamas back to normal and Straight Outer Slice to Neck with Left Kama to the left (Horse Stance)

24)  Step Left to Right into Horse Stance Straight Outer Slice to Neck with Right Kama to the right

Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Hand Axe Level 6 Form   (Based on TKD Dan-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Axes blades out (Back Stance)

2)    Step forward and Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Dual Guarding Block with Both Axes blades out (Back Stance)

4)    Step forward and Flip Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward Outer Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

7)    Step forward and Flip Slice with Left Axe(Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Flip Slice with  Right Axe (Front Stance)

Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



9)   
Square Block with Both Axes blades out (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward then Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)
 Square Block with Both Axes blades out  (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward then Flip Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


13)
 Downward Outer Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance) twist body and Double Cross Slice with Both Axes behind

14)  Face forward and Upper Block with Left Axe blade out (Front Stance)

15)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Axe blade out (Front Stance)

16)  Step forward and Upper Block with Left Axe blade out (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Axe blade out (Front Stance)

 Yell, Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



18)
 Extended Slice to the side with Left Axe to Neck (Back Stance)

19)  Step forward and Flip Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


20)
 Extended Slice to the side with Right Axe to Neck (Back Stance)

21)  Step forward and Flip Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Sai Level 6 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Downward Outer Block and Blade Twist with Left Sai (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Belly Stab with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Downward Outer Block and Blade Twist with Right Sai (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Belly Stab with Left Sai (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward Outer Block and Blade Twist with Left Sai (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Belly Stab with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


7)   
Downward Outer Block and Blade Twist with Right Sai (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Belly Stab with Left Sai (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


9)   
Flip and Outer Block with Left Sai (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Belly Stab with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)
 Flip and Outer Block with Right Sai (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward Belly Stab with Left Sai (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left



13)
 Flip and Outer Block  with Left Sai (Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Belly Stab with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*



15)
 Flip and Outer Block with Right Sai (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Belly Stab with Left Sai (Front Stance)

17)
 Step forward and Belly Stab with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Yell


18)
 Step backward and Flip Handle Jab Strike with Left Sai (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward and Flip Handle Jab Strike with Right Sai (Front Stance)

                                                                                                                  

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Sai Techniques to learn.

1)    Blade twist

2)    Stab

3)    Blocks

4)    Directional Changes

5)    Handle Strikes

6)    Hook strike

7)    Weapons clear


Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Throat

3)    Belly

4)    Wrist

5)    Under Chin

6)    Thigh

7)    Armpits

8)    Eyes

9)    Ears

10)  Under Collar Bone

11)  Under Arm

12)  Kidneys

Basic Functionality of Sai

1)    Hooked portions and points of Sai

2)    Proper hand position on Sai

3)    Proper Striking/Slicing motion with Sai

4)    Proper Arm position using Sai

5)    Using angles

6)    Hand movement on Sai

7)    Twisting Motions using Sai

8)    Fluid motion

9)    Extension of body   

 

 

Escrima Level 7 Form   (Based on TKD Toi-Gye Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot to Back Stance

1)    Backhanded Temple Strike with Left Stick (Back Stance)

2)    Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into Front Stance and Groin Jab with Right Stick with Left Stick Guarding Right Side of Head pointing up.

3)    Step back up to Front with Left Foot and Outer Temple Strike with Right Stick and Outer Knee Strike with Left Stick simultaneously.

Step out with Right Foot to Back Stance

4)    Backhanded Temple Strike with Right Stick (Back Stance)

5)    Half Step to the Right with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Groin Jab with Left Stick with Right Stick Guarding Left Side of Head pointing up.

6)    Step back up to Front with Right Foot and Outer Temple strike with Left Stick and Outer Knee Strike with Right Stick simultaneously.

Step out with Left Foot to Front Stance

7)    Low Cross Block with Both Sticks

8)    Double Temple Jab with Both Sticks (Same Stance)

9)    Front Snap Kick under Chin with Right Foot and land in Front Stance

10)  Temple Strike with Right Stick (Same Stance)

11)  Temple Strike with Left Stick (Same Stance)

12)  Step up with Left  Foot into Closed Stance up on toes then drop into Elbow Pressing Block with both knees bent and with knuckles on hips with Both Sticks hidden behind each side

13)  Step to Left 90* and Instep Heel Stomp with Right Foot and Dual Temple Strike with Both Sticks brining both sticks back to shoulders

14)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and Dual Temple Strike with Both Sticks brining both sticks back to shoulders

15)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and Dual Temple Strike with Both Sticks brining both sticks back to shoulders

16)  Step to Left 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Right Foot and Dual Temple Strike with Both Sticks brining both sticks back to shoulders

17)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and Dual Temple Strike with Both Sticks brining both sticks back to shoulders

18)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and Dual Temple Strike with Both Sticks brining both sticks back to shoulders

19)  Step together with Right to Left then Out with Left Foot to Back Stance and Reinforced Groin Jab with Left Stick supported by Right Stick

20)  Half Step to the Left with Left Foot to Front Stance and Dual Eye Gouge with Both Sticks

21)  Hook Sticks behind head  bringing head down to a Knee Strike with Right Knee

Yell,

22)  Double Half Step turn 180* to Dual Guarding Stance with Both Sticks

23)  Front Snap Kick with Left Foot.

24)  Land in Front Stance and Throat Jab with Left Stick

25)  Step Forward with Right Foot to a Back Stance and Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks

26)  Front Snap Kick with Right Foot

27)  Land in Front Stance and Throat Jab with Right Stick

28)  Step Backward with Right Foot into Back Stance Temple Strike Behind with Right Stick and Knee Strike to Front at the same time with Left Stick.

29)  Jump Forward turning 90* to the Right landing with Left Foot behind Right Foot and Low Cross Block with Both Sticks

30)  Step to the Right 90* into Front Stance and Reinforced  Block with Both Sticks

31)  Turn to Left 270* into Back Stance and Knee Strike with Left Stick while guarding with Right Stick

32)  Half Step to Left with Left Foot into Front Stance Circle Block ending in a Temple Strike with Right Stick

33)  Turn 180* Stepping Left to Right and Out with Right Foot to a Back Stance and Knee Strike with Right Stick while guarding with Left Stick

34)  Half Step to Right with Right Foot into Front Stance Circle Block ending in a Temple Strike with Left Stick

35)  Pivot 90* left into Front Stance and Circle Block ending in a Temple Strike with Right Stick

36)  Pivot to Right into Front Stance Circle Block ending in a Temple Strike with Left Stick

37)  Step to Left with Right Foot 90* and Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Right Stick

Yell

Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Bo Staff Level 7 Form   (Based on TKD Joon-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with Left Foot to Back Stance

1)    J Hook Disarm with Left End (Back Stance)

2)    Front Snap Kick with Left Foot (Land in Cat Stance)

3)    Step Forward and Circular Groin Strike with  Right End (Back Stance)

Step back up to Closed Stance facing forward.

4)    Step out to Right and J Hook Disarm with Right End (Back Stance)

5)    Front Snap Kick with Right Foot (Land in Cat Stance)

6)    Step Forward with Left and Circular Groin Strike with Left End (Back Stance)

Step Up with Left Foot then out 90* left in a Back Stance


7)   
Swooping Jab under chin with  Left End

8)    Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into a Front Stance and Inverted Chin Strike with Right End.

Step forward into a Back Stance

9)    Swooping Jab under chin with Right End

10)  Half Step to the Right with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Inverted Chin Strike with the Left End.

11)  Step Forward to Front Stance Nose Strike with Whole Staff level

12)  Step Forward to Front Stance Knee Block with Whole Staff level

Yell, Double half step turn 180*

13)  Above Head Spin with Whole Staff

14)  90*to left Downward Throat Jab with Left End (Back Stance)

15)  Temple Strike with Left End (Same Stance)

16)  Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into a Front Stance and Temple Strike with Right End.

Step Back up with Left Foot to a Closed Stance then 90* right

17)  90*to left  Downward Throat Jab with Right End (Back Stance)

18)  Temple Strike with Right End (Same Stance)

19)  Half Step to the left with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Temple Strike with Left End.

Step back up with Right Foot to Closed Stance then 90* Left

20)  Reinforced Jab under Chin with Left End (Front Stance)

21)  Retract Staff, Spin Staff on Left Side (Cat Stance) Downward Extended Collar Bone Strike with Whole Staff (Long Back Stance)

22)  Side Kick with Right Foot

23)  Land in Front Stance and Reinforced Jab under Chin with Right End (Front Stance)

24)  Retract Staff, Spin Staff on Right Side (Cat Stance) Downward Extended Collar Bone Strike With Right End (Long Back Stance)

25)  Side Kick with Left Foot

26)  Land in Back Stance Fighting Stance with Left End up.

27)  Twist to the right 135* (Front Stance) Pointing Right End up and away then Slowly pivot back facing front and Instep Jab with Left End

28)  Step Forward into Back Stance Fighting Stance with Right End up

29)  Twist to the Left 135*  (Front Stance) Pointing Left End up and away then Slowly pivot back facing front and Instep Jab with Right End

30)  Step up with Left Foot to Closed Stance facing 90* left and Left Side Block with Left End pointing down

Yell,

31)  Step out with Right Foot to Square Block to the Right with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

32)  Step Back to center with Right Foot then step to left and Square Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Tonfas Level 7 Form   (Based on TKD Yul-Guk Form)

From Choon-Bi, Step out with Left Foot to Horse Stance and Right Tonfa straight out in Short End Punch Position

1)     (Very Slowly with Power) push out with Left Tonfa short end

2)    Fast Extended Temple Strike with Right Tonfa

3)    Fast Extended Temple Strike with Left Tonfa

Double side Step to the Right remaining in Horse Stance, holding Left Tonfa straight out in Short End Punch Position

4)    (Very Slowly with Power) push out with Right Tonfa short end

5)    Fast Extended Temple Strike with Left Tonfa

6)    Fast Extended Temple Strike with Right Tonfa

Step Up with Right Foot then 45* to the right to a Front Stance

7)    Outer Block with Right Tonfa

8)    Front Kick to Chin with Left foot and land in Front Stance

9)    Extended Inward Temple Strike with Left Tonfa

10)  Extended Inward Temple Strike with Right Tonfa

Step Back and Up with Left Foot then 45* to the left to a Front Stance

11)  Outer Block with Left Tonfa

12)  Front Kick to Chin with Right foot and land in Front Stance

13)  Extended Inward Temple Strike with Right End

14)  Extended Inward Temple Strike with Left End

Step back and Up with Right Foot then forward to a Front Stance

15)  (Slowly) Right Outer Block with Right Tonfa

16)  (Slowly) Left Outer Block with Left Tonfa

17)  Hammer Strike to Temple with Right Tonfa

Step Forward to a Front Stance

18)  (Slowly) Left Outer Block with Left Tonfa

19)  (Slowly) Right Outer Block with Right Tonfa

20)  Hammer Strike to Temple with Left Tonfa

21)  Step forward and Jab Strike to the Solar Plexus with Right Tonfa short end

Yell

22)  Step up with Left Foot to Closed Fighting Stance with Both Tonfas

23)  Side Kick with Left Foot and Land in Front Stance

24)  Forearm Strike to Nose with Right Tonfa

25)  Step Up with Right Foot 90* to a Closed Fighting Stance with Both Tonfas

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot landing in Front Stance

27)  Forearm Strike to Nose with Left Tonfa

Step Up with Left Foot to Closed Stance and Both Tonfas at waist

28)  90* to Left Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

29)  Step Forward and Solar Plexus Jab with Right Tonfa (Front Stance)

Step Back and Up with Right Foot 90* to Closed Stance and Both Tonfas at waist

30)  90* to Right Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

31)  Step Forward and Solar Plexus Jab with Left Tonfa(Front Stance)

Step Back and up with Left Foot then 90* to Left into Front Stance

32)  Extended Temple Strike with Left Tonfa

33)  Extended Temple Strike with Right Tonfa

34)  Step Forward and Extended Temple Strike with Right Tonfa

35)  Extended Temple Strike with Left Tonfa

36)  Bring Left Foot up and jump turning 90* to the right landing in a Crossed Stance with Right Foot behind Left Foot then Hammer Strike with Left Tonfa to Temple then retract

Yell, Turn to the right 270*

37)  Reinforced Outer Block with Right Tonfa with tight support against forearm

38)  Step together step to left 180* Reinforced Outer Block with Left Tonfa tight support against forearm


Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Kamas Level 7 Form   (Based on TKD Won-Hyo Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Square Block with Both Kamas inverted (Back Stance)

2)    Switch Both Kamas and Hook behind neck with Left Kama and Temple Strike with Right Kama (Cat Stance)

3)    Outer Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Left Kama (Long Back Stance)

Step up Facing Front then to Right 90*

4)    Square Block with Both Kamas inverted (Back Stance)

5)    Switch Both Kamas and Hook behind neck with Right Kama and Temple Strike with Left Kama (Cat Stance)

6)    Outer Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Right Kama (Long Back Stance)

Step Back Right to left then Left 90*

7)    Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Kamas blades out 

8)    Side Kick with Left foot and land in Back Stance

9)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas (Back Stance)

10)  Step Forward and Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas (Back Stance)

11)  Step Forward and Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Upward Groin Slice with Right Kama and Left Kama in supporting Guard.

Yell, X Block with both Kamas Inverted and then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

13)  Square Block with Both Kamas inverted (Back Stance)

14)  Switch Both Kamas and Hook behind neck with Left Kama and Temple Strike with Right Kama (Cat Stance)

15)  Outer Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Left Kama (Long Back Stance)

Step up Facing Front then to Right 90*

16)  Square Block with Both Kamas Inverted (Back Stance)

17)  Switch Both Kamas and Hook behind neck with Right Kama and Temple Strike with Left Kama (Cat Stance)

18)  Outer Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Right Kama (Long Back Stance)

Step up to low Closed T Stance and Outward neck slice with Both Kamas to either side

19)  Step forward with Left Foot then Right Circle Outer Block with Right Kama (Front Stance)

20)  Front Kick with Right Foot (Front Stance)

21)  Handle End Reverse Punch with Left Kama

22)  Left Circle Outer Block with Left Kama (Front Stance)

23)  Front Kick with Left Foot (Front Stance)

24)  Handle End Reverse Punch with Right Kama

25)  Step Up with Right Foot to face left in Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Kamas blades out to the right

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot

Yell, then Land with Right Foot crossed behind Left Foot

27)  Turn to the left 270* to Fighting Stance with Both Kamas (Back Stance)

28)  Step up to middle then 90* to right to Fighting Stance with Both Kamas (Back Stance)


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Hand Axes Level 7 Form   (Based on TKD Do-San Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)     Outer Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

2)    Flip Slice with Right Axe

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

3)     Outer Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

4)     Flip Slice with Left Axe

Step up Left to Right then 90* turn to the left

5)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Axes (Back Stance) blades out

6)    Step forward and Collar Bone Slice with  Right Axe supported with left arm underneath right arm (Front Stance)

Yell, and 360* Spin

7)    Outer Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Outer Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

9)    Outer Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

10)  Flip Slice with Right Axe

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

11)  Outer Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

12)  Flip Slice with Left Axe

Step Up to Closed stance then 135* turn to the left

13)  Upward Strike to both arm pits with Both Axes (Front Stance)

14)  Right Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

15)  Inward Throat Slice with Right Axe

16)  Inward Throat Slice with Left Axe

Step Back to Closed Stance 90* turn to the Right

17)  Upward Strike to both arm pits with Both Axes (Front Stance)

18)  Left Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

19)  Inward Throat Slice with Left Axe

20)  Inward Throat Slice with Right Axe

Turn to the Left 45*

21)  Rising Block with Left Axe (Front Stance)

22)  Step forward and Rising Block with Right Axe(Front Stance)

Yell, Then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 180* to Horse Stance

23)  Straight Outer Slice to Neck with Left Axe to the left (Horse Stance)

24)  Step Left to Right into Horse Stance Straight Outer Slice to Neck with Right Axe to the right


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Sai Level 7 Form   (Based on TKD Dan-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sai (Back Stance)

2)    Step forward and Flip Handle Punch with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Dual Guarding Block with Both Sai (Back Stance)

4)    Step forward and Flip Handle Punch with Left Sai (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward outer Block and Blade Twist with Left Sai (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Throat Stab with Right Sai (Front Stance)

7)    Step forward and Throat Stab with Left Sai (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Throat Stab with  Right Sai (Front Stance)

Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



9)   
Square Block with Both Sai (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward then Flip Handle Punch with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)
 Square Block with Both Sai (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward then Flip Handle Punch with Left Sai (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


13)
 Downward Outer Block and Blade Twist with Left Sai (Front Stance) Twist body and Double Cross Block with Both Sai inverted behind

14)  Face forward and Upper Block with Left Sai inverted (Front Stance)

15)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Sai inverted (Front Stance)

16)  Step forward and Upper Block with Left Sai inverted (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Sai inverted (Front Stance)

 Yell, Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



18)
 Extended Slice to the Neck with Left Sai (Back Stance)

19)  Step forward and Flip Handle Punch with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


20)
 Extended Slice to the Neck with Right Sai (Back Stance)

21)  Step forward and Flip Handle Punch with Left Sai (Front Stance)

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Nunchaku Level 7 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Downward Outer Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Temple Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Downward Outer Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Temple Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward Outer Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Temple Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


7)   
Downward Outer Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Temple Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


9)   
Outer Temple Strike with Left Nunchaku (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)
 Outer Temple Strike with Right Nunchaku (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left



13)
 Outer Temple Strike with Left Nunchaku (Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*



15)
 Outer Temple Strike with Right Nunchaku (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Yell



18)
 Step backward and Outer Temple Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward and Outer Temple Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

                                                                                                                  

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Nunchaku Techniques to learn.

1)    Under arm catches

2)    Disarms with Chain

3)    Blocks

4)    Directional Changes

5)    Flip Strikes

6)    Spins

7)    Weapons clear

Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Throat

3)    Belly

4)    Wrist/Hand

5)    Under Chin

6)    Thigh/Knee

7)    Armpits

8)    Eyes

9)    Ears

10) Under Arm

11)  Kidneys

12)  Nose

Basic Functionality of Nunchaku

1)    Handles

2)    Chain

3)    Spinners Vs. Straight Cord

4)    Proper Hand position

5)    Using angles

6)    Hand movement

7)    Twisting Motions

8)    Fluid motion

9)    Extension of body   


Escrima Level 8 Form   (Based on TKD Hwa-Rang Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with Left Foot to Horse Stance


1)   
Straight Punch with left hand with Left Stick pointing up (Horse Stance)

Yell

2)    Fast Temple Strike with Right Stick

3)    Fast Temple Strike with Left Stick

Step up with Right Foot and back out with Right Foot to Back Stance 90* Right

4)    Square Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

5)    Hook Right Stick behind head  and pull in to Upward Jab to Solar Plexus with Left Stick (Cat Stance)

6)    Step back out  to Long Back Stance with Right Foot and Inner Temple Strike with Right Stick

7)    Step back up with Right Foot to Closed Stance and Circular Downward Strike to Collar Bone with Right Stick

8)    Step 90* Right with Left Foot to Front Stance and Temple Strike with Left Stick

9)    Step back up with Left foot and 90* to left and Knee Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

10)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

11)  Bring Left Stick down to back of hand on Right Wrist and Hold position while pulling in to a Closed Stance 90* Left and Side Kick with Right Foot

12)  Land in Back Stance and Outer Temple Strike with Right Stick.

13)  Step Forward and Temple Strike with Left Stick (Front Stance)

14)  Step Forward and Temple Strike with Right Stick (Front Stance)

Yell, Turn to Left 270*

15)  Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Solar Plexus Jab with Right Stick (Front Stance)

17)  Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance 180* to the Left)

18)  Step forward Round Kick with Right Foot

19)  Step forward Round Kick with Left Foot

20)  Land in Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks

21)  90* to left Down Block with Left Stick in Front Stance then retract Left Foot to Short Back Stance, In Close Strike to Neck with Right Stick

22)  Step forward into Short Back Stance and In Close Strike to Neck with Left Stick

23)  Step forward into Short Back Stance and in Close Strike to Neck with Right Stick

24)  Step forward into Front Stance and Low Cross Block with Both Sticks

25)  Turn 180* left and slide Backward into Back Stance Dual Elbow Strike

Yell

26)  90* Turn to Left to Closed Stance with Dual High/Low Strike with Both Sticks (Left Stick up) and hold

27)  Double High Low Strike with Both Sticks (Same Stance)

28)  Step forward with Left Foot to Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks (Back Stance)

29)  Step back to middle with Left Foot then out with Right Foot to Back Stance and Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Bo Staff Level 8 Form   (Based on TKD Toi-Gye Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot to Back Stance

1)     J Hook Disarm with Left End (Back Stance)

2)    Half Step to the left  with the Left Foot into Front Stance Side Strike with Right End

3)    Step back up to Front with Left Foot and Front Spin with Whole Staff

Step out with Right Foot to Back Stance

4)    J Hook Disarm with Right End (Back Stance)

5)    Half Step to the Right with the Right Foot into Front Stance Side Strike with Left End

6)    Step back up to Front with Right Foot and Front Spin with Whole Staff

Step out with Left Foot to Front Stance

7)    Low Level Block with Whole Staff level

8)    High Level Chin Strike with Whole Staff level (Same Stance)

9)    Front Snap Kick under Chin with Right Foot and land in Front Stance

10)  Temple Strike with Right End (Same Stance)

11)  Temple Strike with Left End (Same Stance)

12)  Step up with Left  Foot into Closed Stance up on toes then Slowly drop with Knees slightly bent and Spin Behind Body with Whole Staff

13)  Step to Left 90* and Instep Heel Stomp with Right Foot and Face Jab right then left  with Whole Staff then Spin above head

14)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and Face Jab Left then Right with Whole Staff then spin above head

15)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and Face Jab Left then Right with Whole Staff then Spin above head

16)  Step to Left 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Right Foot and Face Jab Right then Left with Whole Staff then Spin above head

17)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and Face Jab Left then Right with Whole Staff then Spin above head

18)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and Face Jab Left then Right with Whole Staff then Spin above head

19)  Step together with Right to Left then out with Left Foot to Back Stance and Low Groin Jab with Left End

20)  Half Step to the Left with Left Foot to Front Stance and Nose Strike with Whole Staff level

21)  Hook Staff behind head  bringing head down to a Knee Strike with Right Knee

Yell,

22)  Double Half Step turn 180* to Under Chin Jab with Left End

23)  Front Snap Kick with Left Foot.

24)  Land in Front Stance and Throat Jab with Left End

25)  Step Forward with Right Foot to a Back Stance and Under Chin Jab with Right End

26)  Front Snap Kick with Right Foot

27)  Land in Front Stance and Throat Jab with Right End

28)  Step Backward with Right Foot into Back Stance Face Jab Behind with Right End and Instep Jab to Front with Left End.

29)  Jump Forward turning 90* to the Left landing with Left Foot Behind the Right Foot and Low Level Block with Whole Staff

30)  Step to the Right 90* into Front Stance and Tightly Supported Solar Plexus Jab with Right End

31)  Turn to Left 270* into Back Stance and Knee Strike with Left End

32)  Half Step to Left with Left Foot into Front Stance Circle Block ending in a Temple Strike with Right End

33)  Turn 180* Stepping Left to Right and Out with Right Foot to a Back Stance and Knee Strike with Right End

34)  Half Step to Right with Right Foot into Front Stance Circle Block ending in a Temple Strike with Left End

35)  Pivot 90* left into Front Stance and Circle Block ending in a Temple Strike with Right End

36)  Pivot to Right into Front Stance Circle Block ending in a Temple Strike with Left End

37)  Step to Left with Right Foot 90* and Extended Strike to Collar Bone with Right End

Yell

Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Tonfas Level 8 Form   (Based on TKD Joon-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot to Back Stance

1)    Backhanded  Extended Temple Strike with Left Tonfa (Back Stance)

2)    Front Snap Kick with Left Foot (Land in Cat Stance)

3)    Step Forward and Low Extended Groin Strike with  Right Tonfa (Back Stance)

Step back up to closed stance facing forward.

4)    Backhanded Extended Temple Strike with Right Tonfa (Back Stance)

5)    Front Snap Kick with Right Foot (Land in Cat Stance)

6)    Step forward and Low Extended Groin Strike with Left Tonfa (Back Stance)

Step Up with Left Foot then out 90* left in a Back Stance

7)    Extended Dual Guarding Block with Both Tonfas

8)    Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into a Front Stance and Upper Forearm Strike with Right Tonfa.

Step forward into a Back stance

9)    Extended Dual Guarding Block with Both Tonfas

10)  Half Step to the Right with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Upper Forearm Strike with the Left Tonfa.

11)  Step forward to Front Stance Double Temple Strike with Both Tonfas short ends

12)  Step forward to Front Stance Double Extended Side Strikes under floating ribs with Both Tonfas

Yell, Double half step turn 180*

13)  Upper Cross Block with Both Tonfas

14)  90*to left  Extended Temple Strike with Left Tonfa (Back Stance)

15)  Opposite Extended Temple Strike with Left Tonfa (Same Stance)

16)  Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into a Front Stance and Solar Plexus Jab with Right Tonfa short end.

Step Back up with Left Foot to a Closed Stance then 90* right

17)  90*to left Extended Temple Strike with Right Tonfa (Back Stance)

18)  Opposite Extended Temple Strike with Right Tonfa (Same Stance)

19)  Half Step to the left with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Solar Plexus Jab with Left Tonfa.

Step back up with Right Foot to a Closed Stance then forward

20)  Reinforced Block with Both Tonfas (Front Stance)

21)  Retract Left Tonfa, aim guard with Right Tonfa (Cat Stance) Throat Jab in Long Back Stance with Left Tonfa.

22)  Side Kick with Right Foot

23)  Land in Front Stance in Dual Guarding Block with Both Tonfas

24)  Retract Right Tonfa, aim guard with Left Tonfa (Cat Stance) Throat jab in Long Back Stance with Right Tonfa

25)  Side Kick with Left Foot

26)  Land in Back Stance Fighting Stance with Both Tonfas

27)  Twist to the right 135*  (Front Stance) slowly pivot back facing front in Pressing Block with Both Tonfas (Left Tonfa at inner forearm on top)

28)  Step Forward into Back Stance Fighting Stance with Both Tonfas

29)  Twist to the Left 135*  (Front Stance) slowly pivot back facing front in Pressing Block with Both Tonfas (Right Tonfa at inner forearm on top)

30)  Step up with Left Foot to a Closed Stance facing 90* left and Hook Punch with Right Tonfa Short end

Yell,

31)  Step out with Right Foot to Square Block to the Right with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)

32)  Step Back to center with Right Foot then step to left and Square Block with Both Tonfas (Back Stance)


Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Kamas Level 8 Form   (Based on TKD Yul-Guk Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot to Horse Stance, holding Right Kama Inverted

1)    (Very Slowly with Power) push out and Upward Slice from groin with Left Kama inverted 

2)    Fast Throat slice with Right Kama

3)    Fast Throat Slice with Left Kama

Double side Step to the Right remaining in Horse Stance, holding Left Kama Inverted

4)    (Very Slowly with Power) push out and Upward Slice from groin with Right Kama inverted

5)    Fast Throat Slice with Left Kama

6)    Fast Throat Slice with Right Kama

Step Up with Right Foot then 45* to the right to a Front Stance

7)    Outer Block with Right Kama normal

8)    Front Kick to Chin with Left foot and land in Front Stance

9)    Inward Temple Strike with Left Kama

10)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Kama

Step Back and Up with left foot then 45* to the left to a Front Stance

11)  Outer Block with Left Kama normal

12)  Front Kick to Chin with Right Foot and land in Front Stance

13)  Inward Temple Strike with Right Kama

14)  Inward Temple Strike with Left Kama

Step back and Up with Right foot then forward to a Front Stance

15)  (Slowly) Right Hand Slice with blade up Left to Right with Right Kama

16)  (Slowly) Left Hand Slice with blade up Right to Left with Left Kama

17)  Temple Strike with Right Kama

Step Forward to a Front Stance

18)  (Slowly) Left Hand Slice with blade up Right to Left with Left Kama

19)  (Slowly) Right Hand Slice with blade up Left to Right with Right Kama

20) Temple Strike with Left Kama

21)  Step forward and Flip Collar Bone Strike with Right Kama

Yell

22)  Step up with Left Foot to Closed Fighting Stance with Both Kamas blades out

23)  Side Kick with Left Foot and Land in Front Stance

24)  Hook Left Kama Blade behind neck and  Inverted Throat Slice with Right Kama

25)  Step Up with Right Foot 90* to a Closed Fighting Stance with Both Kamas blades out

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot landing in a Front Stance

27)  Hook Right Kama Blade behind neck and Inverted Throat Slice with Left Kama


Step Up with left foot to Closed Stance and Kamas resting at hips

28)  90* to Left Square Block with Both Kamas inverted (Back Stance)

29)  Step Forward and Flip Collar Bone Strike with Right Kama (Front Stance)


Step Back and Up with Right Foot 90* to Closed Stance and Both Kamas resting at hips

30)  90* to Right Square Block with Both Kamas inverted (Back Stance)

31)  Step Forward and Flip Collar Bone Strike with Left Kama (Front Stance)

Step Back and up with Left Foot then 90* to Left into Front Stance

32)  Outer Temple Strike with Left Kama

33)  Inner Temple Strike with Right Kama

34)  Step Forward and  Outer Temple Strike with Right Kama

35)  Inner Temple Strike with Left Kama

36)  Bring Left Foot up and jump turning 90* to the right landing in a Crossed Stance with Right Foot behind Left Foot  then Neck Slice with Left Kama straight out

Yell, Turn to the right 270*

37)  Reinforced Block with Both Tonfas blades out

38)  Step together step to left 180*  and Reinforced Block with Both Tonfas blades out


Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Hand Axes Level 8 Form   (Based on TKD Won-Hyo Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Square Block with Both Axes (Back Stance)

2)    Hook Left Axe behind neck and Temple Strike with Right Axe (Cat Stance)

3)    Outer Flip Slice to Neck with Left Axe (Long Back Stance)

Step up Facing Front then to Right 90*

4)    Square Block with Both Axes (Back Stance)

5)    Hook Right Axe behind neck and Temple Strike with Left Axe (Cat Stance)

6)    Outer Flip Slice to Neck with Right Axe (Long Back Stance)

Step Back Right to Left then Left 90*

7)    Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Axes 

8)    Side Kick with Left foot and land in Back Stance

9)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Axes blades out (Back Stance)

10)  Step Forward and Dual Guarding Block with Both Axes blades out (Back Stance)

11)  Step Forward Dual Guarding Block with Both Axes blades out (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Flip Slice to Collar Bone with Right Axe to collar bone and Left Axe in supporting Guard blade level.

Yell, Parallel Block and then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

13)  Square Block with Both Axes (Back Stance)

14)  Hook Left Axe behind neck and Temple Strike with Right Axe (Cat Stance)

15)  Outer Flip Slice to Neck with Left Axe (Long Back Stance)

Step up Facing Front then to Right 90*

16)  Square Block with Both Axes (Back Stance)

17)  Hook Right Axe behind neck and Temple Strike with Left Axe (Cat Stance)

18)  Outer Flip Slice to Neck with Right Axe (Long Back Stance)

Step up to low Closed T Stance with Both Axes in extended Slices to either side

19)  Step forward with Left Foot then Right Circle Outer Slice with Right Axe (Front Stance)

20)  Front kick with Right Foot (Front Stance)

21)  Flip Slice to Collar Bone with Left Axe

22)  Left Circle Outer Slice with Left Axe (Front Stance)

23)  Front Kick with Left Foot (Front Stance)

24)  Flip Slice to Collar Bone with Right Axe

25)  Step Up with Right Foot to face left in Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Axes to the right

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot

Yell, then land with Right Foot crossed behind Left Foot


27)
 Turn to the left 270* to Fighting Stance with Both Axes (Back Stance)

28)  Step up to middle then 90* to right to Fighting Stance with Both Axes (Back Stance)


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Sai Level 8 Form   (Based on TKD Do-San Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)     Outer Slice with Left Sai (Front Stance)

2)    Flip Stab with Right Sai

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

3)     Outer Slice with Right Sai (Front Stance)

4)     Flip Stab with Left Sai

Step up Left to Right then 90* turn to the left

5)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sai (Back Stance)

6)    Step forward and Solar Plexus Stab with  Right Sai supported with left arm underneath right arm  Sai pointed forward (Front Stance)

Yell, and 360* Spin

7)    Outer Stab with Left Sai (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Outer Stab with Right Sai (Front Stance)

Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

9)    Outer Slice with Left Sai (Front Stance)

10)  Flip Stab with Right Sai

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

11)  Outer Slice with Right Sai (Front Stance)

12)  Flip Stab with Left Sai

Step Up to Closed Stance then 135* turn to the left

13)  Flip Both Sai inverted and Crossing Break Out to arms with Both Sai (Front Stance)

14)  Right Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

15)  Inward Throat Slice with Right Sai

16)  Inward Throat Slice with Left Sai

Step Back to Closed Stance 90* turn to the Right  
     

17)  Crossing Break Out to arms with Both Sai inverted (Front Stance)

18)  Left Leg Front Kick landing in Front Stance

19)  Inward Throat Slice with Left Sai

20)  Inward Throat Slice with Right Sai

Turn to the Left 45*

21)  Rising Block with Left Sai inverted (Front Stance)

22)  Step forward and Rising Block with Right Sai  inverted (Front Stance)

Yell, Then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 180* to Horse Stance

23)  Flip Both Sai back to normal and Straight Outer Slice to Neck with Left Sai to the left (Horse Stance)

24)  Step Left to Right into Horse Stance Straight Outer Slice to Neck with Right Sai to the right


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Nunchakus Level 8 Form   (Based on TKD Dan-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Nunchakus held together in each hand (Back Stance)

2)    Step forward and Circular Downward Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Dual Guarding Block with Both Nunchakus held together in each hand (Back Stance)

4)    Step forward and Circular Downward Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward Outer Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Circular Downward Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

7)    Step forward and Circular Downward Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Circular Downward Strike with  Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*


9)   
Square Block with Both Nunchakus held together in each hand (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward then Circular Downward Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)
 Square Block with Both Nunchakus held together in each hand  (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward then Circular Downward Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


13)
 Downward Outer Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance) twist body and Double Cross Spin with Both Nunchakus behind

14)  Face forward and Upper Block with Left Nunchaku held together in each hand  (Front Stance)

15)  Face forward and Upper Block with Right Nunchaku held together in each hand  (Front Stance)

16)  Face forward and Upper Block with Left Nunchaku held together in each hand  (Front Stance)

17)  Face forward and Upper Block with Right Nunchaku held together in each hand  (Front Stance)

 Yell, Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



18)
 Extended Strike to the side with Left Nunchaku to Neck (Back Stance)

19)  Step forward and Circular Downward Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


20)
 Extended Slice to the side with Right Nunchaku to Neck (Back Stance)

21)  Step forward and Circular Downward Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)


Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Knives Level 8 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Downward Outer Slice with Left Knife (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Right Knife (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Downward Outer Slice with Right Knife  (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Left Knife (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward Outer Slice with Left Knife (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Right Knife  (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


7)   
Downward Outer Slice with Right Knife  (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Left Knife  (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


9)   
Flip and Outer Block with Left Knife  (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Right Knife (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)
 Flip and Outer Block with Right Knife  (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward Belly Stab and Twist with Left Knife  (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left



13)
 Flip and Outer Block  with Left Knife  (Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Right Knife  (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*



15)
 Flip and Outer Block with Right Knife  (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Left Knife  (Front Stance)


17)
 Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Right Knife  (Front Stance)

Yell



18)
 Step backward and Belly Stab and Twist with Left Knife  (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward and Belly Stab and Twist with Right Knife  (Front Stance)

                                                                                                          
        

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Knife Techniques to learn

1)    Blade twist

2)    Stab

3)    Blocks

4)    Directional Changes

5)    Handle Strikes

6)    Slices

7)    Infinity

8)    Weapons clear

Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Throat

3)    Belly

4)    Wrist

5)    Under Chin

6)    Thigh

7)    Armpits

8)    Eyes

9)    Ears

10)  Under Collar Bone

11)  Under Arm

12)  Kidneys

Basic Functionality of Knives

1)    Blade portions and points of Knives

2)    Proper hand position on Knives

3)    Proper Striking/Slicing motion with Knives

4)    Proper Hand position using Knives

5)    Using angles

6)    Twisting Motions using Knives

7)    Fluid motion

8)    Blood Groove vs. None

9)    Serrated verses Smooth edge

10)  Weighted

11)  Throwing

12)  Balance

13)  Extension of body  

Escrima Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Choong-Moo Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot 90* to left to Back Stance

1)    Square Block with Both Sticks

2)    Step forward with Right Foot to Front Stance Rising Block with Left Stick and Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick Simultaneously

3)    Step Back Right to middle and out with Left Foot to back Stance 180* to Right and Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks

4)    Step Forward with Left  Foot into Front Stance and Throat Jab with Left Stick

5)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks 90* Left (Back Stance)

6)    Side Kick with Right Foot 180* Behind

7)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks 180* Left to Front (Back Stance)

8)    3 Step Flying Side Kick with Right Foot Land in Back Stance and Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks

Yell,

9)    Turn Left 270* and Knee Strike with Left Stick (Back Stance)

10)  Half Step to Left With Left Foot to Front Stance and Dual Eye Gouge with Both Sticks

11)  Hook Both Sticks behind head and bring head down to Right Knee Strike.

12)  Double Half Step turn 180* Left and Supported Inward Temple Strike with Right Stick supported by Left Stick

13)  Step Forward Round Kick with Right Foot (Front Stance)

14)  Plant Right Foot down and Spin Side Kick with Left Foot

15)  Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks 180* to Right (Back Stance)

16)  Step Forward and Round Kick with Left Foot and land in closed stance 90* Right

17)  Step out with Right Foot to Back Stance  and High and Low Block with Both Sticks level

18)  Jump Straight up into the air and 360* Spin with Both Sticks out

19)  Land in Dual Guarding Block with Both Sticks

20)  Step forward to Front Stance and Groin Jab with Right Stick

21)  Step Right Foot  into Back Stance and outward Temple Strike behind with Right Stick and Knee Strike to Front with Left Stick Simultaneously

22)  Step forward to Front Stance and Solar Plexus Jab with Right Stick

23)  Turn 270* Left and Reinforced  Block with Both Sticks

24)  Step Forward with Right Foot 90*Left to Horse Stance Inward Hammer Temple Strike With Butt end of Right Stick

25)  Outward Temple Strike with Right Stick

26)  Side Kick 180* Left with Right Foot

27)  Step Forward and Side Kick with Left Foot Land in Arm Break with Both Sticks 180* Right

28)  Step forward and Dual Floating Ribs Jab with Both Sticks Butt ends (Back Stance)

29)  Double Half Step Turn 180* Right then Right Rising Block with Right Stick

30)  Throat Jab with Left Stick

Yell

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.



Bo Staff Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Hwa-Rang Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot to Horse Stance Staff at waist level


1)   
Straight Push Strike with Whole Staff level (Horse Stance)

Yell

2)    Fast Temple Strike with Right End

3)    Fast Temple Strike with Left End

Step up with Right Foot and back out with Right foot to Back Stance 90* Right

4)    Square Block with Whole Staff (Back Stance)

5)    Bring Left End Down and around to straight up Groin Strike with Left End (Cat Stance)

6)    Step back out to Long Back Stance with Right Foot Solar Plexus Jab with Right End

7)    Step back up with Right Foot to Closed Stance and over the top one handed Collar Bone strike with Right End.

8)    Step 90* Right with Left Foot to Front Stance and Temple Strike with Left End

9)     Step back up with Left Foot and 90* to left and Ankle Strike with Left End (Front Stance)

10)  Step forward and Temple Strike with Right End (Front Stance)

11)  Bring Both Hands together on middle of Staff and Pull to Left side of Body pulling in to a Closed Stance 90* Left and Side Kick with Right Foot

12)  Land in Back Stance and One Handed Outer Temple Strike with Right End

13)  Step Forward and Temple Strike with Left End (Front Stance)

14)  Step Forward and Temple Strike with Right End (Front Stance)

Yell, Turn to Left 270*

15)  Under the Chin Jab with Left End (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Solar Plexus Jab with Right End (Front Stance)

17)  Under the Chin Jab with Left End (Back Stance 180* to the Left)

18)  Step forward Round Kick with Right Foot

19)  Step forward Round Kick with Left Foot

20)  Land in Back Stance and Under the Chin Jab with Left End

21)  90* to Left Ankle Strike with Left End in Front Stance then Retract Left Foot to short Back Stance, In Close Collar Bone Strike with Right End

22)  Step forward into short Back Stance and In Close Collar Bone Strike with Left Stick

23)  Step forward into short Back Stance and in Close Collar Bone Strike with Right Stick

24)  Step forward into Front Stance and Low Block with Whole Staff

25)  Turn 180* Left and slide Backward into Back Stance Solar Plexus Jab with Right End

Yell

26)  90* Turn to Left to Closed Stance with Double Front Spin  with Whole Staff 

27)  Double Side to Side Spin with Whole Staff (Same Stance)

28)  Step forward with Left Foot Under the Chin Strike with Left End (Back Stance)

29)  Step back to middle with Left Foot then out with Right Foot to Back Stance and Under the Chin Strike with Right End



Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Tonfa Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Toi-Gye Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot to Back Stance

1)     Outer Block with Left Tonfa (Back Stance)

2)    Half Step to the left  with the Left Foot into front stance and Groin Strike with Right Tonfa short end

3)    Step back up to Front with Left Foot and High Outer Block with Right Tonfa and Low Outer Block with Left Tonfa

Step out with Right Foot to Back Stance

4)    Outer Block with Right Tonfa (Back Stance)

5)    Half Step to the Right with the Right Foot into Front Stance and Groin Strike with Left Tonfa

6)    Step back up to Front with Right Foot and High Outer Block with Left Tonfa and Low Outer Block with Right Tonfa

Step out with Left Foot to Front Stance

7)    Dual Low Rib Strike with Both Tonfas Short ends

8)    Dual Temple Strike with Both Tonfas Short ends (Same Stance)

9)    Front Snap Kick under Chin with Right Foot and land in Front Stance

10)  Extended Inner Temple Strike with Right Tonfa (Same Stance)

11)  Extended Inner Temple Strike with Left Tonfa (Same Stance)

12)  Step up with Left  Foot into Closed Stance up on toes then Slowly drop with Knees slightly bent and Elbow Pressing Block with Both Tonfas at hips to the outside

13)  Step to Left 90* and Instep Heel Stomp with Right Foot and W Block  with Both Tonfas

14)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and W Block to the outside with Both Tonfas

15)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and W Block to the outside with Both Tonfas

16)  Step to Left 90* and Instep Heel Stomp with Right Foot and W Block  to the outside with Both Tonfas

17)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and W Block to the outside with Both Tonfas

18)  Step to Right 180* and Instep Heel Stomp with Left Foot and W Block to the outside with Both Tonfas

19)  Step together with Right to Left then Out with Left foot to Back Stance and Low Reinforced Block with Both Tonfas

20)  Half Step to the Left with Left Foot to Front stance and Dual Eye Strike with Both Tonfas

21)  Hook Both Tonfas behind head  bringing head down to a Knee Strike with Right Knee

Yell,

22)  Double Half Step turn 180* to Dual Guarding Block with Both Tonfas

23)  Front Snap Kick with Left Foot.

24)  Land in Front stance and Throat Jab with Left Tonfa short end

25)  Step Forward with Right Foot to a Back Stance and Dual Guarding Block with Both Tonfas

26)  Front Snap Kick with Right Foot

27)  Land in Front Stance and Throat Jab with Right Tonfa

28)  Step Backward with Right Foot into Back Stance Face Jab Behind with Right Tonfa short end and Low Block to Front with Left Tonfa.

29)  Jump Forward turning 90* to the Left landing with Left Foot Behind Right and Low Level X Block with Both Tonfas to the outside

30)  Step to the Right 90* into Front Stance and Reinforced Block with Right Tonfa to the outside

31)  Turn to Left 270* into Back Stance and Low Dual Guarding Extended Strikes with Both Tonfas

32)  Half Step to Left with Left Foot into Front Stance Circle Block with Right Tonfa

33)  Turn 180* Stepping Left to Right and Out with Right Foot to a Back Stance and Low Dual Guarding Extended Strikes with Both Tonfas

34)  Half Step to Right with Right Foot into Front Stance Circle Block with Left Tonfa

35)  Pivot 90* left into Front stance and Circle Block with Right Tonfa

36)  Pivot to Right into Front Stance Circle Block with Left Tonfa

37)  Step to Left with Right Foot 90* and Solar Plexus Punch with Right Tonfa short end

Yell


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Kamas Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Joon-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot to Back Stance

1)    Backhanded  Temple Strike with Left Kama (Back Stance)

2)    Front Snap Kick with Left Foot (Land in Cat Stance)

3)    Step Forward and Upward Groin Slice with  Right Kama inverted (Back Stance)

Step back up to closed stance facing forward.

4)    Backhanded  Temple Strike with Right Kama (Back Stance)

5)    Front Snap Kick with Right Foot (Land in Cat Stance)

6)    Step forward and Upward Groin Slice with Left Kama inverted (Back Stance)

Step Up with Left Foot then out 90* left in a Back Stance


7)   
Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas blades out

8)    Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into a Front Stance and Elbow Strike with Right Elbow Right Kama Blade out behind right shoulder

Step forward into a Back stance

9)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas blades out

10)  Half Step to the Right with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Elbow Strike with Left Elbow Left Kama Blade out behind left shoulder

11)  Step Forward to Front Stance Double Temple Strike with Both Kama handles

12)  Step Forward to Front Stance Double Side Strikes under floating ribs with Both Kamas

Yell, Double half step turn 180*

13)  Upper Cross Block with Both Kamas

14)  90*to left  Neck Slice with Left Kama (Back Stance)

15)  Opposite Neck Slice with Left Kama (Same Stance)

16)  Half Step to the left with the Left Foot into a Front Stance and Flip Strike with Right Kama to Collar Bone.



Step Back up with Left Foot to closed stance then 90* right

17)  90*to left Neck Slice with Right Kama (Back Stance)

18)  Opposite Neck Slice with Right Kama (Same Stance)

19)  Half Step to the left with the Right Foot into a Front Stance and Flip Strike with Left Kama to Collar Bone.

Step back up with Right Foot to Closed Stance then forward

20)  Reinforced Block with Both Kamas blades out (Front Stance)

21)  Retract Left Kama, aim guard with Right Kama (Cat Stance) Flip Strike to Collar Bone in Long Back stance with Left Kama.

22)  Side Kick with Right Foot

23)  Land in Front stance Dual Guarding Block with Both Kamas blades out

24)  Retract Right Kama, aim guard with Left Kama (Cat Stance) Flip Strike to Collar Bone in Long Back stance with Right Kama

25)  Side Kick with Left Foot

26)  Land in Back Stance Fighting Stance with Both Kamas

27)  Twist to the right 135*  (Front Stance) Slowly pivot back facing front in Pressing Block with Both Kamas (Left Kama blade up)

28)  Step Forward into Back Stance Fighting Stance with Both Kamas

29)  Twist to the Left 135*  (Front Stance) Slowly pivot back facing front in Pressing Block with Both Kamas (Right Kama blade up)

30)  Step up with Left foot to Closed Stance Facing 90* left and Hammer Strike to Temple with Right Kama handle

Yell,

31)  Step out with Right Foot to Square Block to the Right with Both Kamas inverted (Back Stance)

32)  Step Back to center with Right Foot then step to left and Square Block with Both Kamas inverted (Back Stance)


Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Hand Axes Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Yul-Guk Form)

From Choon-Bi, step out with left foot to Horse Stance, holding Right Axe level blades up and down

1)    (Very Slowly with Power) push out with Left Axe pointed up blades left and right

2)    Fast Inward/outward Throat Slice with Right Axe

3)    Fast Inward/outward Throat Slice with Left Axe

Double side Step to the Right remaining in Horse Stance, holding Left Axe level blades up and down

4)    (Very Slowly with Power) push out with Right Axe pointed up blades left and right

5)    Fast Inward/outward Throat Slice with Left Axe

6)    Fast Inward/outward Throat Slice with Right Axe

Step Up with Right Foot then 45* to the right to a Front Stance

7)    Outer Block with Right Axe

8)    Front Kick to Chin with Left foot and land in Front Stance

9)    Inward Cross Slice with Left Axe

10)  Inward Cross Slice with Right Axe

Step Back and Up with Left Foot then 45* to the left to a Front Stance

11)  Outer Block with Left Axe

12)  Front Kick to Chin with Right Foot and land in Front Stance

13)  Inward Cross Slice with Right Axe

14)  Inward Cross Slice with Left Axe

Step back and Up with Right Foot then forward to a Front Stance

15)  (Slowly) Right Hand Slice with blade up Left to Right with Right Axe

16)  (Slowly) Left hand Slice with blade up Right to Left with Left Axe

17)  Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Right Axe

Step Forward to a Front Stance

18)  (Slowly) Left Hand Slice with blade up Right to Left with Left Axe

19)  (Slowly) Right hand Slice with blade up Left to Right with Right Axe

20)  Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Left Axe

21)  Step forward and Flip Collar Bone Strike with Right Axe

Yell

22)  Step up with Left Foot to Closed Fighting Stance with Both Axes blades out

23)  Side Kick with Left Foot and Land in Front Stance

24)  Hook Left Axe Blade behind neck and  Throat Slice with Right Axe

25)  Step Up with Right Foot 90* to a Closed Fighting Stance with Both Axes blades out

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot landing in Front Stance

27)  Hook Right Axe Blade behind neck and Throat Slice with Left Axe

Step Up with left foot to Closed Stance and Axes resting at hips

28)  90* to Left Square Block with Both Axes (Back Stance)

29)  Step Forward and Flip Collar Bone Strike with Right Axe (Front Stance)

Step Back and Up with Right foot 90* to Closed Stance and Both Axes resting at hips

30)  90* to Right Square Block with Both Axes (Back Stance)

31)  Step Forward and Flip Collar Bone Strike with Left Axe (Front Stance)

Step Back and up with Left Foot then 90* to Left into Front Stance

32)  Outer Neck Slice with Left Axe

33)  Inner Neck Slice with Right Axe

34)  Step Forward and  Outer Neck Slice with Right Axe

35)  Inner Neck Slice with Left Axe

36)  Bring Left Foot up and jump turning 90* to the right landing in a Crossed Stance with Right Foot behind Left  then Neck Slice with Left Axe straight out

Yell, Turn to the right 270*

37)  Reinforced Block with Both Axes blades out

38)  Step together step to left 180* and Reinforced Block with Both Axes blades out


Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Sai Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Won-Hyo Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Square Block with Both Sai points down (Back Stance)

2)    Hook Left Sai behind neck and Throat Stab with Right Sai (Cat Stance)

3)    Outer Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Left Sai (Long Back Stance)

Step up Facing Front then to Right 90*

4)    Square Block with Both Sai points down (Back Stance)

5)    Hook Right Sai behind neck and Throat Stab with Left Sai (Cat Stance)

6)    Outer Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Right Sai (Long Back Stance)

Step Back Right to left then Left 90*

7)    Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Sai 

8)    Side Kick with Left foot and land in Back Stance

9)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Sai points up (Back Stance)

10)  Step Forward and Dual Guarding Block with Both Sai points up (Back Stance)

11)  Step Forward Dual Guarding Block with Both Sai points up (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Belly Stab to Solar Plexus with Right Sai and Left Arm in Supporting Guard with Sai level.

Yell, Parallel Block and then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

13)  Square Block with Both Sai (Back Stance)

14)  Hook Left Sai behind neck and Throat Stab with Right Sai (Cat Stance)

15)  Outer Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Left Sai (Long Back Stance)

Step up Facing Front then to Right 90*

16)  Square Block with Both Sai (Back Stance)

17)  Hook Right Sai behind neck and Throat Stab with Left Sai (Cat Stance)

18)  Outer Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Right Sai (Long Back Stance)

Step up to low Closed T Stance with Both Sai in Extended Stabs to either side

19)  Step forward with Left Foot then Right Circle Outer Block with Right Sai (Front Stance)

20)  Front Kick with Right Foot (Front Stance)

21)  Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Left Sai

22)  Left Circle Outer Block with Left Sai (Front Stance)

23)  Front Kick with Left Foot (Front Stance)

24)  Flip Strike to Collar Bone with Right Sai

25)  Step Up with Right Foot to face left in Closed Stance Fighting Stance to left with Both Sais to the right

26)  Side Kick with Right Foot

Yell, then Land with Right Foot crossed behind left

27)  Turn to the left 270* to Fighting Stance with Both Sai (Back Stance)

28)  Step up to middle then 90* to right to Fighting Stance with Both Sai (Back Stance)


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Nunchakus Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Do-San Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Outer Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

2)    Downward Circular Strike to Collar Bone with Right Nunchaku

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

3)    Outer Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

4)    Downward Circular Strike to Collar Bone  with Left Nunchaku

Step up Left to Right then 90* turn to the left

5)    Dual Guarding Block with Left Nunchaku Held together in left hand Right Nunchaku caught under right armpit (Back Stance)

6)    Step forward and Flip Strike with  Right Nunchaku supported with left arm underneath right arm  (Front Stance)

Yell, and 360* Spin

7)    Outer Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Outer Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

Left Leg Sweep to left turning 270*

9)    Outer Strike with Left Nunchaku (Front Stance)

10)  Downward Circular Strike to Collar Bone with Right Nunchaku

Half Steps turn to the right 180*

11)  Outer Strike with Right Nunchaku (Front Stance)

12)  Downward Circular Strike to Collar Bone with Left Nunchaku

Step Up to Closed stance then 135* turn to the left

13)  Break Out to arms with Both Nunchaku held together in each hand (Front Stance)

14)  Right Foot Front Kick landing in Front Stance

15)  Infinity spin  with Right Nunchaku

16)  Infinity spin with Left Nunchaku

Step Back to Closed Stance 90* turn to the Right   
    

17)  Break Out to arms with Both Nunchaku held together in each hand  (Front Stance)

18)  Left Foot Front Kick landing in Front Stance

19)  Infinity Spin with Left Nunchaku

20)  Infinity Spin with Right Nunchaku Turn to the Left 45*

21)  Rising Block with Left Nunchaku held together in each hand (Front Stance)

22)  Step forward and Rising Block with Right Nunchaku held together in each hand (Front Stance)

Yell, Then Left Leg Sweep to left turning 180* to Horse Stance

23)  Straight Outer Strike to Neck with Left Nunchaku to the left (Horse Stance)

24)  Step Left to Right into Horse Stance Straight Outer Strike to Neck with Right Nunchaku to the right


Step back up with Right Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Knives Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Dan-Gun Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Dual Guarding Block with Both Knives blades down and out (Back Stance)

2)    Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Right Knife (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Dual Guarding Block with Both Knives blades down and out (Back Stance)

4)    Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Left Knife (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward outer Slice to Thigh with Left Knife (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and infinity Slice with Right Knife (Front Stance)

7)    Step forward and Infinity Slice with Left Knife (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Infinity Slice  with  Right Knife and Collar Bone Stab (Front Stance)

Yell, then Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



9)   
Square Block with Both Knives blades down and out (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Right Knife (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)  Square Block with Both Knives blades down and out  (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Belly Stab and Twist with Left Knife (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left



13)
 Downward Outer Slice with Left Knife (Front Stance) twist body and Double Infinity Slice with Both Knives behind

14)  Face forward and Upper Block with Left Knife blade down and out  (Front Stance)

15)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Knife blade down and out  (Front Stance)

16)
 Step forward and Upper Block with Left Knife blade down and out  (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Upper Block with Right Knife blade down and out  (Front Stance)

 Yell, Leg Sweep and left turn 270*



18)
 Extended Slice to the side with Left Knife to Neck (Back Stance)

19)  Step forward and Infinity Slice with Right Knife (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*

20)  Extended Slice to the side with Right Knife to Neck (Back Stance)

21)  Step forward and Infinity Slice with Left Knife (Front Stance)


Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Sword Level 9 Form   (Based on TKD Chon-Ji Form)

From Choon-Bi, 90* turn to the left

1)    Downward Outer 45* Slice with Sword to left (Front Stance)

2)    Step forward and Neck Slice with Sword to right (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


3)   
Downward Outer 45* Slice with Sword to right  (Front Stance)

4)    Step forward and Neck Slice with Sword to left (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


5)   
Downward Outer 45* Slice with Sword to left (Front Stance)

6)    Step forward and Neck Slice with Sword to right (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


7)   
Downward Outer 45*  Slice with Sword to right (Front Stance)

8)    Step forward and Neck Slice with Sword to left (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left


9)   
Upward 45* Slice with Sword to left (Back Stance)

10)  Step forward and Neck Slice with Sword to right (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*


11)
 Upward 45* Slice with Sword  to right (Back Stance)

12)  Step forward and Neck Slice with Sword to left (Front Stance)

90* turn to the left



13)
 Upward 45* Slice  with Sword to left (Back Stance)

14)  Step forward and Neck Slice with Sword to right (Front Stance)

Twist and turn to the right 180*



15)
 Upward 45* Slice with Sword to right (Back Stance)

16)  Step forward and Neck Slice with Sword to left (Front Stance)

17)  Step forward and Downward Outer 45* Slice with Sword to right (Front Stance)

Yell



18)
 Step backward Downward Outer 45* Slice with Sword to left (Front Stance)

19)  Step backward Downward Outer 45* Slice with Sword to right (Front Stance)

                                                                                                                  

Step back up with Left Foot to Choon-Bi and weapon clear.

Sword Techniques to learn.

1)    Blade twist

2)    Stab

3)    Blocks

4)    Directional Changes

5)    Handle Strikes

6)    Slices

7)    Wrist rolls

8)    Weapons clear

Targets to Learn

1)    Temple

2)    Throat

3)    Belly

4)    Wrist

5)    Under Chin

6)    Thigh

7)    Armpits

8)    Eyes

9)    Ears

10)  Under Collar Bone

11)  Under Arm

12)  Kidneys

Basic Functionality of Sword

1)    Blade portions and points of Sword

2)    Proper hand position on Sword

3)    Proper Striking/Slicing motion with Sword

4)    Proper Arm position using Sword

5)    Using angles

6)    Hand movement on Sword

7)    Twisting Motions using Sword

8)    One Hand vs Two Hand

9)    Blood Groove vs. None

10)  Serrated vs. Smooth

11)  Carbon Steel vs. Stainless

12)  Folded vs. Flat

13)  Full tang vs. welded

14)  Fluid motion

15)  Extension of body  

 

*Completion of Test of all Forms Earns the Black Chevron and Rank of Weapons Specialist after other Criteria are met. See the handbook for Details.*

 

GSW MARTIAL ARTS ACADEMY
Chang Hun Tai Chi
STUDENT HANDBOOK

  

 

What Is Tai Chi?

 
Tai Chi is a term brought to us by the Chinese, Tai Chi (Taiji) is the basic philosophical principal of “Supreme Ultimate” and contrasted with the philosophical principal “Without Ultimate”. This translated into simplistic terms is “everything” and “nothing”, “beginning” and “ending”, or “positive” and “negative”. This philosophy is commonly characterized with the symbol of the “yin-yang”. Through Daoist principal it is described as that from which existence flows.

Western Society views the “yin-yang” as the basics of balance in all things. In Martial Arts, Balance is a key ingredient to all parts within and without. Balance means order. Let us look at the example of light and dark. Without light there is no dark. Without dark there can be no light.

Through this philosophy, the Chinese developed an internal Chinese Martial Art called Tai Chi. This Martial Art has been practiced for centuries for its defensive training as well as its health benefits. This practice has developed into a traditional form of meditation and exercise that flows with grace and beauty.

Originally a Martial Art, Tai Chi was developed as a style of Chinese boxing or kung fu (gung fu). The slow deliberate movements were designed to help the practitioner develop precision in their movements while at the same time develop their balance, and focus. The Martial Art aspect of Tai Chi was designed to promote good Health, Meditation for good psychological balance, and the Martial or Defensive attributes.

What we now view as Tai Chi only received that appellation in, approximately, the middle of the 1800’s. Over the last two centuries, Martial Arts has grown and developed from a “Way of War” into sport and exercise. Tai Chi has even become known as the “Yoga” of Martial arts. As this change from war to sport developed, new “Styles” or “Hybrid” Martial Arts have come into existence from all over the world. Tai Chi has spread through every continent and changed shape in many ways. A great number of Martial Arts have adapted concepts of Tai Chi into their teaching principals as well as adapted popular styles of Martial Arts into a Tai Chi format. Such examples of these conversions are TaeGukKwon (Korean Tae Kwon Do/Tai Chi), Tai Chi Jitsu (Tai Chi/Japanese Jiu-jitsu), and Taikiken (Japanese Aikido/Tai Chi).

 

The Development of Chang Hun Tai Chi

As our bodies age, joints stiffen, muscles weaken, and bones get brittle. A hard style Martial Art is not very practical if you chose to start learning later in life. Using the concepts of Tai Chi, Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do practitioners can still develop useful defensive skills while getting exercise and relaxing the body and mind. Our bodies require oxygen to live and as we age it seems that getting the right amount of oxygen for our bodies becomes more difficult. This can be achieved through getting into shape by doing proper exercise and learning the proper way to breathe. However, one should not discount beginning a study in the Martial Arts because they “feel too old”. By taking the concepts of the hard style Martial Arts like Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do and combining it with the slow, low impact, presentation of Tai Chi, a person can get the usefulness of getting into shape, relaxation, energy regeneration, and maintaining a strong mental focus well into their later years. Does this mean that Tai Chi is only for the old and frail? The answer is no. Young and old alike can benefit from the value of the combination of Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do and Tai Chi. Through the joining of the two principals, we are able to maintain the philosophy that is at the root of Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do and incorporate the internal and external body benefits from the slow motion and proper breathing. Chang Hun Tai Chi is based on the forms of Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do in a slow motion open handed relaxed Tai Chi Style and encompasses the self-defensive posture and way of life that Tae Kwon Do offers. The young can learn the principals and philosophies and movements to help them mature into thriving adults. Adults can benefit from relaxation and focus and breathing. Seniors can benefit from the movements to aid in maintaining joint structure, muscle flexibility, and focus. The melding of the two principals is not meant to “water down” the styles but use both styles to bring Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do and Tai Chi to those of all ages in a single format. A union that is both internally and externally beneficial to the practitioner.

Tai Chi and Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do easily fall together through one commonality. Tai Chi and Chang Hun are both based on an internal power. Chang Hun uses the internal power from the core applied and transferred through the body into kicks and punches thus allowing for a harder penetration into the target by both. Tai Chi uses the internal power in greatly the same way, but also uses that internal power to assist with focus, breathing, and conditioning within.

Movements

The movements in Chang Hun Tai Chi are, like traditional Tai Chi, meant to be performed in a smooth, and graceful like manner. Hands are not clenched into fists as in hard style Chang Hun but open and relaxed to allow the arms and shoulders to relax. Foot movement should be slow and deliberate with graceful sliding steps to assist and maintain balance and build coordination. Every outward pushing movement is preceded by an inward draw in of breath and focus. The body should be relaxed and controlled at the same time. Each movement should continue to develop relaxed precision. Such as Yoga is for the flexibility of the body, in Chang Hun Tai Chi, the movements should bring flexibility to body and mind. Through the tenets of Tae Kwon Do, we learn to control ourselves while remaining in a relaxed posture. This is crucial for a martial artist where in energy conservation is a necessity during a potential conflict.

Focus

The word Focus has many different meanings. To the practitioner of Chang Hun Tai Chi, Focus is merely a point to which concentration is placed. That point of concentration is considered internal or “their attention is directed internally”. Most all stressors are external and by turning our attention internal assists in temporarily removing those stressors from our thoughts preventing them from influencing our movements or actions. This focus is achieved through the assistance of a near meditative state, through breath control, slow deliberate movement, soothing surroundings (possibly including soothing music), low noise, and limited stresses. Focus of this type is not meant to add tension the body but to relax it such as in a meditative posture.

Breathing

Breathing is an essential part of Chang Hun Tai Chi, much as it is in any Martial Art. Breathing properly purifies us and brings in what our bodies require to maintain and nurture life, and removes that which is toxic to us. Toxins create Tension. Purity promotes Promise. Breathing during movement should be from the diaphragm, Slow, Deep, and Controlled. The more air we bring into our lungs, the more oxygen rich blood travels to our muscles, joints, and other tissues promoting healing, detoxification, and cellular regeneration. The relaxation during the proper breathing allows for better expansion of the blood vessels and allows the blood to be carried through the body easier and more efficiently.

Self Defense

          Self-defense in traditional Tai Chi is based off of Kung Fu fighting styles. Through Chang Hun Tai Chi, the self-Defense is based off of Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do and incorporates Kung Fu principals and movements. The Movements are based on the Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do Forms. The self-defense is based on Chang Hun Tae Kwon Do fighting style. The Principals followed are 7 Basic tenets: Modesty, Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, Indomitable Spirit, and Respect. Chang Hun Tai Chi is not meant to be used as an offensive posture but in a defensive manner only. If Chang Hun Tai Chi is used offensively, the practitioner is not using the basic principles ingrained into the art-form and are therefore not using Chang Hun Tai Chi.

Meditation

As Christians, we learn to pray. Prayer can be considered a type of meditation. With Arise Martial Arts, we choose to meditate to commune with the Holy Spirit to bring us closer to the Heavenly Father. As we learn to relax during the meditation we draw even closer to God.

Components of the Classroom

For the avid Martial Artist, testing for Belts or Sashes is a large part of their training expectations as well as a traditional Uniform. However, with Chang Hun Tai Chi, testing is not a requirement for learning the leisure and relaxation side of the art. Uniforms are not a requirement either, but if you are looking to promote in the art then the following will aid you in the pursuit of belt/sash ranking.

The Tenets of Chang Hun Tai Chi

The tenets of Chang Hun Tai Chi should serve as a guide for all serious students of the art. At Arise Martial Arts, We use the original 5 tenants of Courtesy, Integrity, Perseverance, Self-Control, and Indomitable Spirit. We have also added Modesty, and Respect in order to further Enhance our students. We believe that the use of all 7 tenets equal Humility and that Humility is required to be a proper Black Sash. Jesus Christ was the most Humble to ever walk the earth and our ultimate goal as Christians is to be more Christ like.

MODESTY Chang Hun Tai Chi students are expected to be humble about their accomplishments. Those who flaunt their achievements may have physical power, but their achievements are hollow, for they lack the spirit of Chang Hun Tai Chi. Yin cannot exist without the Yang, so Chang Hun Tai Chi cannot exist without the Spirit. This means being free of vanity and conceit. A student should not boast about merits or achievements.

 

COURTESY - It can be said that courtesy is an unwritten regulation prescribed by ancient teacher of philosophy as a means to enlighten human beings while maintaining a harmonious society. It can further be, as an ultimate criterion, required of a mortal. Chang Hun Tai Chi students should attempt to practice the following elements of courtesy to build up noble character and to conduct the training in an orderly manner, as well.

 1. To promote the spirit of mutual concessions

2. To be ashamed of one’s vices, showing contempt to those of other’s

3. To be polite to one another

4. To encourage the sense of justice and humanity

5. To distinguish the instructor from the student, senior from junior, and elder from younger

 

INTEGRITY - In Chang Hun Tai Chi, the word integrity assumes a looser definition than the one usually presented in Webster’s dictionary.

 

One must be able to define right and wrong and have the conscience, if wrong, to feel guilt. Listed are some examples, where integrity is lacking:

 

1. The instructor who misrepresents himself and his art by presenting improper techniques to his students because lack of knowledge or apathy.

2. The student who misrepresents himself by “fixing” breaking materials before demonstrations.

3. The instructor who camouflages bad techniques with luxurious training halls and false flattery to his students.

4. The student who requests rank from an instructor, or attempts to purchase it.

5. The student who gains rank for ego purposes or the feeling of power.

6. The instructor that teaches and promotes his art for materialistic gains.

7. The student who feels ashamed to seek opinions from his juniors.

 

PERSEVERANCE - There is an old Oriental saying, “Patience leads to virtue or merit.” “One can make a peaceful home by being patient for 100 times.” Certainly, happiness and prosperity are most likely brought to the patient person. To achieve something, whether it is a higher degree or the perfection of a technique, one must set his goal, and then constantly persevere. Robert Bruce learned his lesson of perseverance from the persistent efforts of a lowly spider. It was this perseverance and tenacity that finally enabled him to free Scotland in the fourteenth century. One of the most important secrets in becoming a leader of Chang Hun Tai Chi is to overcome every difficulty by perseverance.

 

Confucius said; “one who is impatient in trivial matters can seldom achieve success in matters of great importance.”

 

SELF - CONTROL - This tenet is extremely important inside and outside the Do-Jang, whether conducting oneself in free sparring or in one’s personal affairs. A loss of self-control in free sparring can prove disastrous to both student and/or an opponent. An inability to live and work within one’s capability or sphere is also a lack of self-control. According to Lao-Tzu “the term of stronger is the person who wins over oneself rather than someone else.”

 

INDOMITABLE SPIRIT - “Here lie 300, who did their duty,” a simple epitaph for one of the greatest acts of courage known to mankind. Although facing the superior forces of Xerxes, Leonidas and his 300 Spartans at Thermopylae showed the world the meaning of indomitable spirit. It is shown when a courageous person and his principles are pitted against overwhelming odds.

 A serious student of Chang Hun Tai Chi will at all times be modest and honest. If confronted with injustice, he will deal with the belligerent without any fear or hesitation at all, with indomitable spirit, regardless of whomsoever, and however, many the number, may be.

 

Confucius declared; “it is an act of cowardice to fail to speak out against injustice.” As history has proven, those who have pursued their dreams earnestly and strenuously with indomitable spirit have never failed to achieve their goals.

 

RESPECT - In the Do-Jang, we show respect to the Black Sashes, instructors, parents, and guardians by answering, “Yes Sir”, or “Yes Ma’am”.    It is also proper to end all responses with “Sir” or “Ma’am”. We bow to our instructors before class and after class not for religious purposes but out of respect for their hard work and dedication to the art and the students. Respect is imbued throughout our Student Rules and Etiquette to help teach our students to honor their place of learning, build pride in their school and in their self. Respect is a key ingredient in their learning and we strive to make it a part of their personality inside the school and out.

 

Training Hall (Do-Jang)

 

A Do-Jang is an area where young and old, men and women, regardless of race or creed, come to learn Chang Hun Tai Chi for the promotion of their mental, moral, physical, and cultural education. It should be a place where a certain “esprit de corps” between members can be established with a common goal of promoting and cultivating a noble character. Certainly to fill the prerequisites necessary to attain these ideas, a well-trained Black Sash instructor is needed. This is a primary consideration. The hall itself must also have the facilities, equipment, and strict regulations to help discipline the student’s mind and body. The size of the Do-Jang and equipment to be used can be flexible according to the circumstances and individual choice. Again, the only thing that cannot be compromised is the quality of the instructor.

 

Practice Suit (Do-Bok)

 

The Do-Bok is considered a primary necessity in training for the following six reasons.

 

1. The wearing of the Do-Bok should instill pride in the wearer as a practitioner of Chang Hun Tai Chi.

2. It identifies individual capacity and degree of Chang Hun Tai Chi cultural education attained.

3. The style of the Do-Bok is symbolic of Chang Hun Tai Chi heritage and tradition.

4. Grade and degree changes, which are noted with Sash color, create incentive while at the same time preserving humility.

5. It is extremely practical and healthy.

6. It is a tool to be used. Listening to the material snap can help indicate proper use of power.

 

The Do-Bok consists of a shirt, pants, and sash. It is very important for the wearer to keep it clean at all times, wear it correctly, and treat it with the respect owned to its art.

 

 

Student Sash

 

The student sash is meant to represent the soft style of Tai Chi; in Tae Kwon Do, we use more rigid belts to represent the “hard style”. The Students sash is to remain tied properly at all times. If the Sash should come untied during class, the student is to bow and turn around and face away from the instructor and re-tie it properly. The Knott is to be tied properly and should ALWAYS be positioned on the left side. ‘Traditional Karate” ties the belt facing to the right to symbolize power. This can easily be misunderstood as aggression. The Knott being tied to the left or positioned on the left symbolizes Defense. Since we study the art of self-defense it would go against the nature of our art form for the sash to be tied facing to the right or be positioned on the right side.

 

It is NOT acceptable to wash the sash. Tradition indicates that if you wash the sash, you wash away the experience earned while wearing the sash. The sash should not be permitted to drag the floor. The sash should be held and worn as a badge of honor for all of the achievements the student has earned. The sash is of a delicate fabric and will fray easily. This should be avoided as a frayed sash indicates lack of respect for the art form you are learning. Each Color has its meaning. By disrespecting the sash, it is an indication that the student does not respect the meaning of the sash.

  

Rules & Etiquette

 

Bowing - We bow, not for religious reasons, but to show respect.  We do a 6-second bow in order to show self-control, self-discipline, and respect.  We bow when entering and leaving the Do-Jang.  We also bow when stepping on or off the mat area.   When a Black Sash enters the Do-Jang, the class will be asked to stop, face the door, and bow to show respect.

 

Yes Sir/Yes Ma’am - In the Do-Jang, we show respect to the Black Sashes, instructors, parents, and guardians by answering, “Yes Sir”, or “Yes Ma’am”.    It is also proper to end all responses with “Sir” or “Ma’am”.